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 > Negotiating

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Jayco-noslide

Galesburg,Il., USA

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Posted: 08/14/12 09:16am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RV's depreciate a lot so I would look up the NADA book value and consider offering something way below the "retail value". I would start quite low and not worry about "offending" the seller. If they were trading it in they wouldn't probably get what they think it might be worth. They probably bought it for a figure maybe as low as 80% of the sticker cost or less. Keep in mind that, if you decide in a couple of years that you want to sell or trade, it will depreciate a lot more by then.


Jayco-noslide

LoneCowboy

Colorado

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Posted: 08/14/12 09:50am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MickeyBrennan wrote:

Watch a few episodes of "American Pickers" or "Pawn Stars" they do it all the time.

1) Learn to flinch.
The flinch is one of the oldest negotiation tactics but one of the least used. A flinch is a visible reaction to an offer or price. The objective of this negotiation tactic is to make the other people feel uncomfortable about the offer they presented.

2) Recognize that people often ask for more than they expect to get.
This means you need to resist the temptation to automatically reduce your price or offer a discount.

3) The person with the most information usually does better.
You need to learn as much about the other person's situation as possible.

4) Practice at every opportunity.

Most people hesitate to negotiate because they lack the confidence. Develop this confidence by negotiating more frequently. Ask for discounts from your suppliers. As a consumer, develop the habit of asking for a price break when you buy from a retail store. Here are a few questions or statements you can use to practice your negotiation skills:

"You'll have to do better than that."
"What kind of discount are you offering today?"
"That's too expensive." Wait for their response afterwards.
Be pleasant and persistent but not demanding. Condition yourself to negotiate at every opportunity will help you become more comfortable, confident and successful.

5) Maintain your walk away power.

Everything is worth negotiating.


this is a great post.
Also another add on.

First person to name a number loses. (watch Pawn stars, he knows what it's worth, he knows what he is willing to pay for it and he always makes the other guy name a number)

4x4Bob

California.

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Posted: 08/14/12 10:25am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Be prepared to walk away the first time if the price is too high.

Before you go, give out your telephone number and tell the seller to call you in a couple of weeks when they decide to lower the price.

Also, tell them that you will then let him know if you are still looking or if you already have a unit.

I have received calls from sellers in a day or so.

Bob


2001 2500 Silverado LS 4x4 6.0, 4.10
2007 Jayco Eagle 288RLS
Cocktails for 6, Dinner for 4, Sleeps 2
--------------------
End of dirt road, no signs in sight, sun going down: I am not lost, just getting ready to go camping.


MickeyBrennan

Lancaster County, PA

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Posted: 08/14/12 12:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

keatonb16 wrote:

MickeyBrennan wrote:

Watch a few episodes of "American Pickers" or "Pawn Stars" they do it all the time.

1) Learn to flinch.
The flinch is one of the oldest negotiation tactics but one of the least used. A flinch is a visible reaction to an offer or price. The objective of this negotiation tactic is to make the other people feel uncomfortable about the offer they presented.

2) Recognize that people often ask for more than they expect to get.
This means you need to resist the temptation to automatically reduce your price or offer a discount.

3) The person with the most information usually does better.
You need to learn as much about the other person's situation as possible.

4) Practice at every opportunity.

Most people hesitate to negotiate because they lack the confidence. Develop this confidence by negotiating more frequently. Ask for discounts from your suppliers. As a consumer, develop the habit of asking for a price break when you buy from a retail store. Here are a few questions or statements you can use to practice your negotiation skills:

"You'll have to do better than that."
"What kind of discount are you offering today?"
"That's too expensive." Wait for their response afterwards.
Be pleasant and persistent but not demanding. Condition yourself to negotiate at every opportunity will help you become more comfortable, confident and successful.

5) Maintain your walk away power.

Everything is worth negotiating.


when I was selling for GM and someone asked for a discount or a cheaper price than what I offered I would simply ask them.."based on what"?.....they would just stare or mumble because they were looking for a discount just because....research is the most important negotiating tool...the more you know the more likely you will win.
If you can give a seller documented proof as to why you will only pay a certain amount you will be more apt to get it...simple


Sure. See 3 above.

Why take a confrontational attitude during a sales negotiation? Everybody I know would walk if a salesman tried to browbeat them. Maybe that kind of thinking is why GM need a bailout?

And.. You're driving a RAV 4? What about the Brand?


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keatonb16

New Brunswick Canada

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Posted: 08/14/12 12:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Why take a confrontational attitude during a sales negotiation? Everybody I know would walk if a salesman tried to browbeat them. Maybe that kind of thinking is why GM need a bailout?

It is called taking control of the negotiations...most people want a discount just because they think they should get one...nothing based on fact...very few actually will have info to prove why there should be a reduction...listen chief...thanks for your perspective but before I even talked price the vehicle was sold...you might have thought that this was my first discussion with them but price never came up until I had a commitment to purchase,,,you might not believe it but the question works...why would you discount the price when they have no idea why....and along with GM,,many companies required a bailout in your country,,,GM is the only one I believe that has paid it back in full....
and I drive a rav4 because of the value to me...I don't own GM..not married to it...retired and able to buy what I want


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keatonb16

New Brunswick Canada

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Posted: 08/14/12 10:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jayco-noslide wrote:

RV's depreciate a lot so I would look up the NADA book value and consider offering something way below the "retail value". I would start quite low and not worry about "offending" the seller. If they were trading it in they wouldn't probably get what they think it might be worth. They probably bought it for a figure maybe as low as 80% of the sticker cost or less. Keep in mind that, if you decide in a couple of years that you want to sell or trade, it will depreciate a lot more by then.



that's why I said earlier in this thread to buy a 7 or 8 year old TT..depreciation slows dramatically...the difference in value of a 2004/ 2003/ 2002 etc isn't much.

MickeyBrennan

Lancaster County, PA

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Posted: 08/14/12 03:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

keatonb16 wrote:

...listen chief...thanks for your perspective but before I even talked price the vehicle was sold...you might have thought that this was my first discussion with them but price never came up until I had a commitment to purchase


Listen Chief ! ? ! ? Information is important to everyone in negotiations about price. Perhaps my viewpoint is a little different because of the demographics in my area. Any salesman who tries to get tough is soon replaced with a nice guy. There are hundreds of dealers (car, truck and RV) within an hours drive. Nobody buys a vehicle from an arrogant know it all.

I looked at your other posts. How come you feel a need to defend yourself so frequently? I meant nothing personal. I am just discussing another effective way of bargaining. Chief? You wouldn't talk that way in person. Calm down, this is friendly.

OhhWell

Florida

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Joined: 06/27/2011

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Posted: 08/14/12 04:51pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MickeyBrennan wrote:

keatonb16 wrote:

...listen chief...thanks for your perspective but before I even talked price the vehicle was sold...you might have thought that this was my first discussion with them but price never came up until I had a commitment to purchase


Listen Chief ! ? ! ? Information is important to everyone in negotiations about price. Perhaps my viewpoint is a little different because of the demographics in my area. Any salesman who tries to get tough is soon replaced with a nice guy. There are hundreds of dealers (car, truck and RV) within an hours drive. Nobody buys a vehicle from an arrogant know it all.

I looked at your other posts. How come you feel a need to defend yourself so frequently? I meant nothing personal. I am just discussing another effective way of bargaining. Chief? You wouldn't talk that way in person. Calm down, this is friendly.


Yes, you can tell by "Listen Chief" what kind of car salesperson he was... Things may be different up in Canada where he's from but here, I have several dealers for each domestic make within 50 miles. You better believe price is brought up pretty early in my discussions with the sales force.


1998 bounder 36s V10 F53

keatonb16

New Brunswick Canada

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Posted: 08/14/12 05:22pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You better believe price is brought up pretty early in my discussions with the sales force


good for you...I wouldn't give you a price until you made a commitment to purchase...until the value is built in the product my price is always going to be too high...once value exceeds price by 1 penny a sale is made...and thanks..I made plenty...enjoying my life at 44 after working 21 very successful years in the business...now I stay home and raise my kids,,best job ever.

keatonb16

New Brunswick Canada

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Joined: 07/28/2012

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Posted: 08/14/12 04:48pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MickeyBrennan wrote:

keatonb16 wrote:

...listen chief...thanks for your perspective but before I even talked price the vehicle was sold...you might have thought that this was my first discussion with them but price never came up until I had a commitment to purchase


Listen Chief ! ? ! ? Information is important to everyone in negotiations about price. Perhaps my viewpoint is a little different because of the demographics in my area. Any salesman who tries to get tough is soon replaced with a nice guy. There are hundreds of dealers (car, truck and RV) within an hours drive. Nobody buys a vehicle from an arrogant know it all.

I looked at your other posts. How come you feel a need to defend yourself so frequently? I meant nothing personal. I am just discussing another effective way of bargaining. Chief? You wouldn't talk that way in person. Calm down, this is friendly.


you say it is friendly but you quoted my post and called me confrontational and a browbeater then arrogant....I am just saying it was a question I used after I had a commitment to purchase from the buyer..if negotiations are not going well because they simply want more of a discount just because you need to regain control...I know it sounds like a slap in the face but it brings negotiations to a head..I can assure you at this point in the sales process I can get away with saying anything to the client if I wanted too..
in conclusion my point is if you are making an offer be able to back it up with fact...a number out of the air is meaningless

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