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 > Delima on new tires

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coolbreeze01

Redding, Ca

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Posted: 08/18/12 09:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

More info that may be of interest:

"Subject to the limitations contained in this Limited Warranty, your new Maxxis tires are warranted under this Limited Warranty against failures due to defective materials and workmanship for a period of five years from the date of manufacture."

It is a prorated 5-year warranty. I don't know what other brands offer on their ST tires.


2008 Dodge 3500 With a Really Strong Tractor Motor...........
LB, SRW, 4X4, 6-Speed Auto, 3.73, Prodigy P3, Blue Ox Sway Pro........
2014 Sandsport 26FBSL

joshuajim

Mojave Desert

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Posted: 08/18/12 11:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Tire weight is irrelevant. NASCAR tires weigh 21 to 25 lbs and are rated for 250 MPH. Why are they lighter?? Because lighter tires run COOLER! Cooler means less chance of failure.

Yes I know the car only weighs 3400 lbs.

joshuajim

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Posted: 08/18/12 12:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gale Hawkins wrote:

Is this a racing thread or TT tire thead?


It's a response to the tire weight myth.

joshuajim

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Posted: 08/18/12 02:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Still not necessarily true. Two different tires from the same manufacturer may not be made on the same assembly line, with the same materials or equipment or even in the same country.

They could have different cord diameters of different tensile strength requiring more or less cords and rubber to cover them.

I think what we can agree on is that heavier tires do not dissipate heat as well, which is detrimental to longevity, require more power to overcome inertia and will slightly increase stopping distances due to the same reason.

In my book, lighter is better.

Gale Hawkins

Murray, KY

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Posted: 08/18/12 11:48am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Is this a racing thread or TT tire thead?

Gale Hawkins

Murray, KY

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Posted: 08/18/12 12:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

joshuajim wrote:

Gale Hawkins wrote:

Is this a racing thread or TT tire thead?


It's a response to the tire weight myth.


OK I understand now.

I think we all agreed two tires the same size from the same maker's series the heavier one will be stronger.

Jumping up a load range or two is a good thing if you do not go below min pressure for the tire itself and for the load it is carrying.

JJBIRISH

Butler, PA, USA

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Posted: 08/19/12 08:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If I were to accept some of the arguments being presented, I would fail to see the need for or even a reason for tire mfg to even publish their load/inflation tables for trailer tires… if the recommendation was to always use the branded Maximum PSI, they wouldn’t bother mentioning and distributing them…

Tires are manufactured to have a measured deflection… it is by design that the tires ability to carry its loads and maintain its contact patch that the tires deflection remain relatively constant… this is done by adjusting air pressure in the tire to match its carried load…

All tires have a measured static loaded radius that establishes proper deflection when loaded and aired to the proper PSI…

All vehicle manufactures are required to have the proper tire size and air pressure requirements for each vehicle and axle affixed to the vehicle…

The recommendation that trailer tires use the maximum inflation comes from the known fact that RVs being the largest user of these tires come and remain almost fully loaded for their entire life, and as a secondary reason they will often be used at the maximum rated speed…

I have never found any reference of tires over heating by following the inflation tables… the only exception I am aware of is in upsizing for added reserve capacity that requires more air…

While I can’t and won’t argue with another’s personal experience and observations with tire roll over I can say I have never noticed this, sway, or any other tire related problems. when following the inflation tables, and I have used them with just about every size and type of single and tandem axle trailer…
Tire weight is part bulk, and part material selection and or processes used… to many variables to equate weight alone as evidence of quality…
Recipes of chemical or rubber compounding are one of the most closely guarded secrets of the tire industry… cap ply’s might be single yarn or twisted cords… the single yarns can be cheaper lighter and thinner, but they can also improve heat dissipation and reduce belt edge separation…
Quality can be made with lighter or heavier components, and we outsiders don’t have the information to know are say what weight alone means…
So I guess we can believe whatever we want about it…


Love my mass produced, entry level, built by Lazy American Workers, Hornet


JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 08/18/12 06:28pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The subject is tires on a trailer. Tow vehicle tire tech and race car tire tech simply doesn't apply.
Tire pressure need for a tire in a trailer position vs a race car tire requirements or the tow vehicle tires needs is apples vs oranges.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

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joshuajim

Mojave Desert

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Posted: 08/19/12 01:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

The subject is tires on a trailer. Tow vehicle tire tech and race car tire tech simply doesn't apply.
Tire pressure need for a tire in a trailer position vs a race car tire requirements or the tow vehicle tires needs is apples vs oranges.


How about this. I will pay you $100 for every item of technology that has transferred from consumer tires to racing tires if you will pay me $10 for the reciprocal.

Lowsuv

Oregon

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Posted: 08/18/12 02:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In every case an E rated tire weighs more than a C rated tire in the same exact size , in the same exact model , from the same exact manufacturer for ST use.
Racing tires are oranges , we are discussing apples.

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