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Open Roads Forum  >  RV Lifestyle

 > Best for Boondocking?

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Sparkie616

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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Posted: 08/18/12 03:18pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm been thinking of boondocking the next time I head south. I've basically been a motorhome type, but I'm wondering if one type of RV has any advantages over others when it comes to camping out on the desert in LTV areas around Yuma and Quartzite. Thinking of things like propane, etc.


Sparkie616

skipnchar

Topeka or somewhere else

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Posted: 08/18/12 03:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Smaller units of ANY type are easiest to maneuver off road or on back roads but any TYPE of RV can boondock successfully if it's equipped right. SURE don't want compressor driven fridge, electric only water heater, small battery bank, or skimpy tanks but most of those things can be changed fairly easily. Ground clearance would also be somelthing to consider. I boondock much of the time in some VERY backwoods areas and my rear door is located far enough from my axles that it puts the steps in danger on uneven ground. I've twice replaced the steps due to grounding.
Good luck / Skip


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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 08/18/12 04:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi,

Have enough solar panels and the limiting factor for me is the fresh water supply. I would be better off with a compressor fridge.

Here is a website to help find some locations:

http://freecampsites.net/


Regards, Don
Full Time in a Kustom Koach Class C 28'5", 256 watts Unisolar, 875 amp hours in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, Magnum 3000 watt PSW inverter.

ArcticDodge

Sammamish, WA

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Posted: 08/18/12 07:15pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If I were in your position, I'd have a sub 40 foot class A DP with a Jeep Wrangler in tow. Fairly extensive quality high capacity solar / battery / control system to keep things powered with limited generator use needed.


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Queens Carriage

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Posted: 08/18/12 07:38pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you still have the class C it would do fine. Just have solar, gen, use a extenda stay set up for propane, water jugs so every time you go out pick up water. you will do fine.

Golden_HVAC

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Posted: 08/19/12 03:42am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a 1997 Bounder, with 100 gallon fresh water tank, built on a 17,000 pound GVWR chassis, with only a 13,300 pound GVW.

So it can carry 2,734 pounds before exceeding the GVWR, and even with only two passengers it comes very close to the 17,000 pound limit.

It makes a great boondocking RV because it has such a large fresh water tank, the black tank is 59 gallons, and while grey is only 42 gallons, I usually water some plants that desperately need the water while dry camping.

I have a 400 watt solar system, 4 golf cart batteries, and can stay out about 2 weeks if I am careful with the water, or longer if I bring back water while out sightseeing or going around town looking for internet Wi-Fi connections.

The next vehicle will probably be a F-450 with a extended range diesel fuel tank, and perhaps a 50 or 75 gallon fresh water tank to refill the fifth wheel's supply. though I did look at a toyhauler with a 100 gallon standard tank and optional 100 gallon tank in it. It would work well as a full time unit too.

Just keep looking for the perfect RV. The Glendale Titianum was a great brand no longer in production, that had dual fresh water tanks near the axles, so had a very light weight hitch, and still great cargo rating. IT was also a great full timer's vehicle.

I know a couple of full timers in larger busses, and some in a Airstream travel trailer pulled by a E-350 that had a 6.5 KW generator mounted in it. So there are all kinds of RV's out there. Most popular seems to be class A Diesel pushers, they typically will have a 75+ gallon fresh water tank, and will be able to stay out about a week or more. They typically already come with a generator, and large battery system. There is plenty of room for more solar panels, and usually already have a 400 + amp hour battery bank. Some even have a inverter to make 12 VDC into 120 VAC already installed.

Fred.

bukhrn

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Posted: 08/19/12 07:37am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

skipnchar wrote:

Smaller units of ANY type are easiest to maneuver off road or on back roads but any TYPE of RV can boondock successfully if it's equipped right. SURE don't want compressor driven fridge, electric only water heater, small battery bank, or skimpy tanks but most of those things can be changed fairly easily. Ground clearance would also be somelthing to consider. I boondock much of the time in some VERY backwoods areas and my rear door is located far enough from my axles that it puts the steps in danger on uneven ground. I've twice replaced the steps due to grounding.
Good luck / Skip
This is my biggest concern, & with a 29' Class C I have very little clearance, (10") before things start getting ripped off, this is the only reason we don't do any "true" Boondocking, as much as I'd like to.


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tonyandkaren

pennsylvania

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Posted: 08/19/12 07:59am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

All types of RVs boondock in Quartzite and Yuma. As has been mentioned already ,ground clearance is somewhat of a concern but there are a lot of places that you will have no trouble getting into no matter what you have. Large fresh water ,holding and propane tanks will certainly make it more convenient but there are pump out services , dump stations and places to get water and propane close by. You'll need either solar panels or a generator for a long stay.


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Sparkie616

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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Posted: 08/19/12 01:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks, I appreciate the advice. Probably will stay on the motorhome route.

pnichols

Santa Cruz Mountains

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Posted: 08/19/12 06:29pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To my way of thinking, contingency planning is the name of the game for RV boondocking. ESPECIALLY if the type of boondocking is fairly remote (in the North American continent) ... without other campers within normal walking or cell phone range.

Here's some examples of RV contingency planning for self-contained remote boondocking:

- At least one generator along capable of running air conditioning for the RV.

- At least two ways of recharging the RV's batteries.

- At least two ways of heating the RV.

- At least two ways of cooling the RV.

- A way of off-loading grey tank contents into the black tank.

- A way of lifting containers up in the air to refill the RV's main freshwater tank.

- At least two batteries available for starting the main vehicle's engine.

- Capability for changing of any tire on the RV ... and of course at least one spare tire along for each different tire size on the RV including a TOAD, a tow vehicle, and the TT or 5'er.

- Capability for continuing to keep your food cold if the main refrigerator should fail.

- Cell phone range boosting equipment on board.

- Extra leveling blocks over that normally needed (these can be used to help in getting unstuck).

- Full size shovel on board.

- Tow strap or chain for pulling ... a pull rating way over the RV's weight.

- Permanent protection covers over all roof vents in case of heavy rain, high winds, or roof vent mechanism failure.

- Anti-unfurl lock on the awning.

- High-jeopardy spare parts along: Hot water heater igniter, refrigerator igniter, extra main engine oil, extra generator oil and spark plugs, extra refrigerator control board, etc..

- Some spare gasoline for the main vehicle engine.

- Additional way(s) of heating food over and above the microwave oven or cooktop.

- Cold weather covers for all of the RV's windows.

- Firewood on board in case none is available locally.

- Certain unusual medical equipment (in addition to a comprehensive first aide kit) along, such as a set of crutches in case of sprained ankles out in the middle of nowhere, etc..

- Complete set of chairs and a table for outside use.

- Mosquito abatement capability along for outside use around the fire or table.

- Basic RV leak repair capability along (Eternabond, caulking & gun, etc..)

- Fairly powerful 12V fan along that can be used inside, or outside on an extension cord.

- All LED lighting in the RV for extending the RV battery's effective operating time.

Over the years we've gotten our small Class C RV to where all of the above, and more, have been addressed.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit

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