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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > Repair Leak in Travel Trailer

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4aSong

Northwest Arizona

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Posted: 09/25/12 04:57pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Recently we notice a soft wall area in the front right area of the trailer and was wondering just how difficult it would be to repair. Is there any posting showing the step by step approach on removing the exterior aluminum and or interior wall covering and replacing it once repairs are made?.

Don't know the best way to approach this but I'm sure others have experienced the same with their RV and either repaired it themselves or had it repaired. I am mechanically inclined and have the time and tools to tackle it, just need advise on best way to start.

Another option would be to have an RV repair facility do it but I don;t know of any in the area, if you know of one in the Kingman, Bullhead City or Lake Havasu areas that you know of please advise.

Any assistance pointing me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks


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donn0128

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Posted: 09/25/12 05:04pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Depending on the type of aiding you have. Aluminum is better, you can strip it off for reuse pretty fast. Get down to the problem, repair it and reinstall the siding. Smooth siding? Take things apart from the inside, fix and reinstall. More difficult, but totally doable by a person with average skills.


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Oasisbob

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Posted: 09/25/12 05:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After the problem is diagnossed and fixed I strongly suggest having an interior pressure test done to find any other leaks before more damage is done. Best of luck.


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Mark and Linda

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Posted: 09/25/12 07:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On leaks: A few days ago we were camping and I got out of bed and felt something that just didn't seem right with a small area in the floor. Today, I go out and remove the strip below the front door to see what I can find. Well, I was right on some soft wood. I have been replacing some floor boards, this was even in the front storage compartment on the right side of my Puma. When I get everything back together I am going to have to redo the door seal on the front right compartment. The water ran in under the linoleum. I have never seem any standing water in that area.

4aSong

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Posted: 09/25/12 08:38pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

donn0128 wrote:

Depending on the type of aiding you have. Aluminum is better, you can strip it off for reuse pretty fast. Get down to the problem, repair it and reinstall the siding. Smooth siding? Take things apart from the inside, fix and reinstall. More difficult, but totally doable by a person with average skills.


My trailer is a 1995 Prowler, the exterior has aluminum siding which looks to be panels, how difficult is it to remove and reinstall, looking at it I believe I can just remove the corner trim pieces and caulking but not sure how to remove the panel as it looks like there is some type of lip or interlock where the pieces join. Any advise

donn0128

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Posted: 09/25/12 10:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes they are interlocking, but when you start taking things apart you will quickly see how they are pot together. Snap staple, snap staple. Corrugated aluminum are probably the easiest to fix. Once the windows etc are out and the siding is carefully removed you will be able to see how much damage there is. From there on it is basic wood working skills and some wood.

westend

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Posted: 09/26/12 12:28am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are a few threads in the "vintage" section showing restoration/repairs. As others have said, the aluminum sided trailers are a lot easier to repair. If you think you have extensive damage in the wall section, you can remove the interior paneling and replace it. This is sometimes easier if no fixtures are in the way. You will more than likely discover rotted framing in that section, it is typical of an unobserved leak.


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4aSong

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Posted: 09/26/12 10:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

westend wrote:

There are a few threads in the "vintage" section showing restoration/repairs. As others have said, the aluminum sided trailers are a lot easier to repair. If you think you have extensive damage in the wall section, you can remove the interior paneling and replace it. This is sometimes easier if no fixtures are in the way. You will more than likely discover rotted framing in that section, it is typical of an unobserved leak.


Can you be more specific on where in the "VINTAGE" section I should look ?. Thx

CampingN.C.

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Posted: 09/26/12 05:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I tore the rear wall off of mine and rebuilt a lot of the wood studs in a weekend, mostly by myself. It's not too bad. Don't expect the finish product to look like nothing was ever done. Make sure you have a good air staple gun.


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dcb17b

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Posted: 09/26/12 07:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I believe the siding is put on from the top down,so removal would be bottom up.If the area is not to big you maybe able to fix it from the inside. That is what I did on my current camper. I just cut away the soft wall board,removed the wet insulation and blew a fan into the area to dry it out.I did not have to remove any framing as it is still good enough. To finish the repair I will probably have to remove the end stands(it is in the front wall of bedroom) to get to a good area to reattatch some new wall board of some sort. My saving grace is that it is in an area that is covered by mattress so the repair piece does not have to match.


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