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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > Looking to find the toughest TT for many years to come.

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jmtandem

western nevada

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Posted: 01/23/13 08:54am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You might look at importing an RV from Australia. They seem to be able to put 'RV' and 'quality' into the same sentence unlike most American RV builders.

* This post was edited 01/23/13 11:03am by jmtandem *


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coolbreeze01

Redding, Ca

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Posted: 01/23/13 09:31am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When I was shopping for my current Komfort, the sales folks did chin-ups on the cabinets. I don't know if that's still in the sales play book
Look for a heavy frame, shocks, and a good reputation. Plan to up-grade tires and possibly rims. Don't overload or speed over rough ground. Have fun.


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Prince George Area

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Posted: 01/23/13 05:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We love our Nash. It's been there and done that. We run up and down the Cassiar Hwy in the summer. Lots of camping in the bush as well.





RoyB

King George, VA

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Posted: 01/23/13 09:36am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

X2 on Australia off-road trailrs.

The toughest TT trailers I have ever seen are those from Australia that Robert Ryan shows us on here from time to time... They sure have a pretty price tag but are really built to withstand the "outback" there in Australia.

I don't know if they sell a US version or not as the AC voltage system there is different then ours...

I would love to own one of their beefed-up smaller off-road TT versions.

Roy Ken

Slownsy

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Posted: 01/23/13 04:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wery prisey hear alright, but we conwerth 110v to 240v hear so cant se why not the other way,12v still the same, door on lefthand side but properly not eligal in the USA


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69 Avion

Phoenix, Arizona

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Posted: 01/23/13 06:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are quite a few Airstream trailers that are falling apart by being driven down paved roads. The 22' models seem to be the worst, but I can't imagine taking their thin sheet metal frames down rough roads. Check out the Air Forums for more info, but the AS wouldn't be one of my choices. For extreme usage, the Australian trailers seem well built, but I don't know if they are 4 season trailers.


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canoe on top

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Posted: 01/23/13 09:43pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I took my Nash, (Northwood, Arctic Fox/Nash) up the Dempster Highway, (456 miles one way unpaved,and then you turn around and come back, Yukon Territory/Northwest Territories, end up 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle), and over the Top of the World Highway, (Yukon Territory to Alaska). Did bend both axles on frost heaves between Tok and Haines Junction, AK. but was traveling too fast for conditions. Other than the bent axles no other problems.

* This post was edited 01/24/13 02:50pm by canoe on top *

nvreloader

Western Nevada

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Posted: 01/23/13 10:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Northwood Arctic Fox series.


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Lowsuv

Oregon

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Posted: 01/23/13 09:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Komfort
my 2002 Komfort 21T (purchased new ) came with a taller (heavier ) steel frame than competing brands.
The gross axle weight was 7200 # rating and it typically weighed about 5000 # on the axles. The published empty weight is about 4670 # for the axles.
It shipped with 205/75R15 load range C tires each rated for about 1800 # each .
You can increase your survival rate by going to 225/75R15 load range E which have about a 2450# rating .
we camp frequently down gravel roads on forest service or blm lands in oregon.
70 % no hookups .
so i would look for any trailer that has a large difference between the empty weight and the maximum axle weight.
our komfort has held up well for the gravel road type camping we do .
one of our buddies had his lightweight (bought new ) continue to become un-nailed. he now owns a komfort.
nash and arctic fox were considered but komfort is slightly more heavy duty for a conventional trailer.
look for a trailer that weighs more per actual lineal foot . that is one way to start.

69 Avion

Phoenix, Arizona

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Posted: 01/23/13 09:28pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One thing that you need to go down rough roads is a trailer that has good ground clearance and a relatively short overhang. Otherwise, you aren't going where you may want to go no matter how tough the trailer is. That is why an Airstream won't work. Even the short Bambi will get hung up on many obstacles or drag the back end going through minimal dips in the road.

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