RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Tech Issues: Redneck Tank Heater

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Redneck Tank Heater

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Sponsored By:
Huntindog

phoenix arizona USA

Senior Member

Joined: 04/08/2002

View Profile



Posted: 01/25/13 05:04pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We were at a dog trial a couple of weeks ago and had a unusual cold snap for Arizona. We had lows in the single digits (1 degree one night)
and daytime temps in the 30s. This went on for 5 days, and exsposed my TTs weaknesses. It did OK at first, but each day got worse.
Running the heater full bore, and opening roof vents o keep from baking us seemed to be the best for the water system. Doing this, we had running water until the temp hit about 5 degrees.

It would take until about 3PM to get running water back when we lost it.

So I am planning some improvements in case it should happen again.
The underbelly is coming off and some changes made.
I am already leaning towards AC powered pipe heaters. They should work well, but will cost a lot to do them all.
I also have some different insulation upgrade ideas than what I have seen here so far. I have seen different upgrades for the underbelly between the frame rails, but never anything for the areas outside of the frame rails. This is a fairly large surface of over 70 square feet on my unit.
I am considering installing some rigid insulation under the ourside skirting. Probably won't be able to do it all, but every bit should help.

Holding tanks didn't seem to be a problem, likely because the furnace ductwork practically lays on top of them.
But I have low cost idea for some tank heaters.
I have some old water bed heaters laying around.
If I can glue them to the bottom of the tanks, and power them with the generators....This could save me some coin.

The goal is running water with out constant furnace use down to about -15 degrees. The generator would be running constantly in these conditions.


Huntindog
2010 Palomino Sabre 30BHDS
TWO bathrooms...No waiting!
MICHELIN XPS RIBS LRE
2011 Silverado Big Dually 3500 4x4 CC D/A
EQUALIZER Hitch
100% BOONDOCKING
Check out Rusty and her pups at www.bluecollarbrittanys.com


epusher

Michigan

Senior Member

Joined: 03/28/2011

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/25/13 05:31pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was into the underbelly on mine earlier this year. There's not much insulation in there. I didn't pull the hole cover down, but enough to run some wires. Good luck.


2010 Sabre 30BHDS: 10 gal elct/gas dsi, 15k a/c, 1.5 bath, high fidelity package
2010 GMC Sierra 2500HD 4x4, 1 dog, 1 wife, 2 kids, 2 cats


wa8yxm

Wherever I happen to park

Senior Member

Joined: 07/04/2006

View Profile


Online
Posted: 01/25/13 05:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My concern, epically with the waste tanks, is that the heaters might get warm enough to melt plastic. Other than that, sounds like a plan to me.

Francesca Knowles

Port Hadlock, Washington

Senior Member

Joined: 02/23/2011

View Profile



Posted: 01/25/13 06:08pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Waterbed heaters are placed under a plastic bladder, so I see no problem as far as the plastic goes.

I used a couple of those for underplant heat in my greenhouse once and they worked all right for that use...


" Not every mind that wanders is lost. " With apologies to J.R.R. Tolkien

chinook507

Fountain

Senior Member

Joined: 11/16/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/25/13 08:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Black tank solution that I have used is I put a gallon down in the tank and I have made it 9 days in the high country with pretty low temps here during hunting season in Colorado.

I just keep the grey tank draining and have put a tank heater mat on the bottom of my fresh tank and insulated it.


2001 Excursion V10
2010 Dunesport Monsoon
1997 Kawasaki 1100STX Jet Ski
1991 Kawasaki Bayou 300 4X4
1989 Kawasaki Bayou 220 2X4

Francesca Knowles

Port Hadlock, Washington

Senior Member

Joined: 02/23/2011

View Profile



Posted: 01/25/13 08:33pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

chinook507 wrote:

Black tank solution that I have used is I put a gallon down in the tank and I have made it 9 days in the high country with pretty low temps here during hunting season in Colorado.

I just keep the grey tank draining and have put a tank heater mat on the bottom of my fresh tank and insulated it.


A gallon of WHAT down in the tank?

smkettner

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 01/25/13 08:41pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ran into same issue a couple years ago.

I added 120v Ultraheat brand tank heaters to the three waste tanks.
120v/12v pad to the fresh water tank.
Wrapped 120v heat tape around the waste pipes then wrapped with pipe insulation.
Added 12v recirculating system to keep fresh water flowing.
All together it has worked well for me. I think I am good down to at least 0 and maybe -10F or lower.
My underbelly is fully exposed.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675 watts solar
Send a PM if I missed something

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/25/13 09:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have an enclosed underbelly. What I did, and so far works well is to drill 3/4" dia holes in the side of the floor vents pan so some heat air gets directed into the underbelly. In my case it helps that one vent is between the fresh and black tank and the other is between the two grey tanks. The holes in my case are probably bigger than needed, a temp probe in the underbelly area shows the underbelly gets about 10F hotter than the trailer. you might give this a try, very simple and easy to do. Evenif you vents are close to the tanks, it may very well be enough to keep from freezing up. If I was to do it again, I'd start with 1/2" dia holes.


2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison


PatrickA51

Lost

Senior Member

Joined: 04/05/2012

View Profile



Posted: 01/25/13 09:32pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Francesca Knowles wrote:

chinook507 wrote:

Black tank solution that I have used is I put a gallon down in the tank and I have made it 9 days in the high country with pretty low temps here during hunting season in Colorado.

I just keep the grey tank draining and have put a tank heater mat on the bottom of my fresh tank and insulated it.


A gallon of WHAT down in the tank?


x2

dieseltruckdriver

Black Hills of SD

Senior Member

Joined: 08/24/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/25/13 09:40pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

epusher wrote:

I was into the underbelly on mine earlier this year. There's not much insulation in there. I didn't pull the hole cover down, but enough to run some wires. Good luck.

I did the same, and I was surprised to find several inches of insulation that had to be moved just to see my black tank. That and heat is vented into them. I will feel much better this early spring when we are in the low 20s just using things as normal.


1995 F-250 7.3 Powerstroke
2000 Arctic Fox 27-5L

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Redneck Tank Heater
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS