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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > Dry Weight vs Gross Weight

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Biff 13027

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:02am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I know this question has been beat to death, but what is the difference between the 2 numbers. I know that dry weight is the trailer without options but dowes that include just water, propane, etc? I am looking at a 2011 Edgewater 271 BHE which has 5950 dry weight and 10,000 gross weight. Number are too far apart for me to make any sense.

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:04am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Typically dry weight is with nothing but the trailer. If it is liquid, it ain't dry. And obviously all the stuff you put into the trailer doesn't count either.


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donn0128

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:13am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dry weight is the mystical number no one has ever seen. It is basically a number some engineer came up with, that was massaged by the marketing department to help entice unsuspecting buyers into buying larger than they can handle with their tow vehicles. If you want to know the true nu,ber you MUST load everything i to the trailer you will carry and go to the scales. Since that is not practical, the next best thing to do is simply take the trailers GVWR as your weight ready to camp. Base your ability to tow a specific trailer on that number and there will be no surprises when you do buy.


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donn0128

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:23am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bumpyroad wrote:



gross weight would be maximum weight of trailer plus "stuff". IMHO this is largely a meaningless number with respect to whether your TV will tow/handle.
bumpy


Totally wrong!
Trailers GVWR is the MAXIMUM that it is designed to carry.
Since it is nearly impossible for people to determine with any sort of accuracy, short of weighing every single item. Adding all those numbers to their scaled unloaded weight to determine tow-ability by a vehicle is plane silly. For expedience sake and to always be on the safe side of towing weights why not simply use the trailers GVWR? Much simpler IMHO. But if your that anal and have the time by all means take every single item you intend to place in The trailer and weight them. Don't forget to add the weight of the batteries, propane, water, waste to the numbers. Oh and don't forget to add the options and accessories added to the trailer, or how about the weight of changes in design or materials since tue mystical "dry" number was conceived by some idiot at the factory.

* This post was edited 03/18/13 09:48am by donn0128 *

Bumpyroad

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Biff 13027 wrote:

I know this question has been beat to death, but what is the difference between the 2 numbers. I know that dry weight is the trailer without options but dowes that include just water, propane, etc? I am looking at a 2011 Edgewater 271 BHE which has 5950 dry weight and 10,000 gross weight. Number are too far apart for me to make any sense.


gross weight would be maximum weight of trailer plus "stuff". IMHO this is largely a meaningless number with respect to whether your TV will tow/handle it etc. most people don't keep throwing stuff in until they hit this magic number and max it out. what matters is dry weight, plus water/propane/and stuff. perhaps 1,000-1,500 lbs.?
bumpy





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Posted: 03/18/13 09:23am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GVWR is rating all the components of the vehicle, generally the weakest link will dictate that. Axle ratings, frame, springs, etc.

There was a survey done on here were people gave the measured weights, dry and GVWR. The average weight people added was about 1200 pounds, most in the 1000-1500 pounds over dry weight. Full timers are usually in the 3000 pound range!

The GVWR is good to know for the type of traveling you do and how close you will come. But dry + 1500 pounds is a fair estimate for most RVers that are not full timing.


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lanerd

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:51am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok, I'm going to add my two cents here. First I think Bumby meant to say "including" instead of "plus"....maybe not.

Secondly, the "dry" is derived differently by different mfg'ers. Some actually include all the accessories that are installed by the factory.....then again, some do not. You also have to take into consideration any accessory added by the dealer. So before you put in one glass, plate, or roll of toilet paper you will need to weigh the rv to get the actual dry weight. This is the only true and accurate method.

The GVWR is (as mentioned above) is derived by the "components" that make up the weight handling aspects of the rv. Axles, brakes, tires, frame, springs, ect. This rating is, of course, the maximum that you should allow the rv to weigh at any given moment. Once again, the only true and accurate way to determine this...is to get the rv weighed.

So, to determine the amount of "stuff" you can put in the rv is by subtracting the two "measured by scale" weights. This figure is then called CCC (cargo carrying capacity).

Hope this helps

Ron


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Bumpyroad

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Posted: 03/18/13 10:27am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

lanerd wrote:

Ok, I'm going to add my two cents here. First I think Bumby meant to say "including" instead of "plus"....maybe not.

Secondly, the "dry" is derived differently by different mfg'ers. Some actually include all the accessories that are installed by the factory.....then again, some do not. You also have to take into consideration any accessory added by the dealer. So before you put in one glass, plate, or roll of toilet paper you will need to weigh the rv to get the actual dry weight. This is the only true and accurate method.

The GVWR is (as mentioned above) is derived by the "components" that make up the weight handling aspects of the rv. Axles, brakes, tires, frame, springs, ect. This rating is, of course, the maximum that you should allow the rv to weigh at any given moment. Once again, the only true and accurate way to determine this...is to get the rv weighed.

So, to determine the amount of "stuff" you can put in the rv is by subtracting the two "measured by scale" weights. This figure is then called CCC (cargo carrying capacity).

Hope this helps

Ron


yes, to clarify, IMHO the GVWR is meaningless with respect to whether your TV will tow/handle it. what is important is dry weight, plus wet stuff plus accessories, plus your 1,000-2,000 lbs. of "stuff", a number which hopefully should come out under the trailers GVWR.

most people don't keep throwing stuff in until they hit this magic number and max it out.

bumpy

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:55am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dry weights are a joke as no one ever tows and empty, less than fully equipped trailer. The simplest way to determine your actual, real world weights is to load the as you would for a trip and go to the CAT Scales. What could be simpler? Every person I have ever met who did so was amazed at how much heavier their rig was (than they had expected).

The first number most folks blow by is the TV's GVWR, if you are anywhere near your towing capacity you are almost always at or over. The same is true for GCWR, get anywhere near it and the TV is overloaded. Just load and go weigh the rig and then.... tell me I'm wrong.

Biff 13027

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Posted: 03/18/13 09:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Great tips. Thank you all.

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