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 > rv camping in Canada, different than camping in the US?

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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 12/07/16 10:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It depends on where you are planning to go. I much prefer small town campgrounds run by the local community.


Regards, Don
Full Time in a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

SoundGuy

S Ontario

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Posted: 12/08/16 09:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Domromer wrote:

I know this is a really broad question...but I'll ask it anyways...How does rv camping in Canada differ from the US?


"Broadly speaking" camping here in Canada is much the same as it is in the US and the closer you are to major populations or if you're in what are considered tourist areas then getting a site without reservations can be difficult from about mid June to after Labour Day, that time period when the weather is at it's summer's best and kids are out of school. Canada is a HUGE country so I'd suggest you first determine where in Canada you'd like to visit as there's little point researching the western provinces if you intend to head to Ontario or to the east coast. Avoid deluging yourself with too much information, just pick an area and start by checking out the provincial park system in that province in which you may be interested. Of course there are local parks, conservation areas, national parks, private parks of all descriptions but you can't really go wrong with the provincial park systems. Now is the time as reservation windows are getting close for summer 2017 camping and in highly populated areas such as S Ontario you won't want to be just pulling into any park in July without a reservation, particularly on weekends. That's not to you can't get lucky but especially when on a trip when time is of the essence why chance it? Figure out where you want to go and book accordingly when you expect to be in populated and tourist areas.

Welcome to Canada, EH? [emoticon]

Jayco-noslide

Galesburg,Il., USA

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Posted: 12/08/16 09:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Big Difference-$$$. Camping in US national parks with the senior pass runs around $12/day with free entrance. In Canada the pass is not recognized so the fee could be 2 to 3 times as much and a pass is required daily as I recall. Also, higher fuel. Nevertheless, the Canadian Rockies are awesome so, within the overall cost of RVing, the extra wouldn't be a reason not to go. I don't think we made reservations but it would be safer to.


Jayco-noslide

romore

Okanagan valley British Columbia

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Posted: 12/08/16 10:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

National park fees have been waived for 2017 in honor of the country's 150th birthday. That will likely increase traffic for the high season so plan accordingly. We have traveled in the western U.S. and have not found any real differences, you will notice gas and diesel cost significantly more in Canadian dollars and are readily available. Familiar chains like Walgreens are not to be found, neither are some food stuffs like grits or collard greens. Liquor laws are quite different and the prices may scare you (think taxes), we are just starting to see it in grocery stores here in B.C.
I think you will find we are generally a friendly lot so please, leave the guns at home.

2gypsies

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Posted: 12/08/16 01:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We spent a lot of time in Canada and the Yukon on our way up to Alaska and returning. We didn't have any reservations. Yes, if you do the very popular areas such as Banff or Jasper or near a big city, you might have to get reservations. We prefer the boonies. We loved the campgrounds and we didn't need electric or other hookups so they were great for us.


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Little Kopit

TheMaritimes.ca

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Posted: 12/08/16 04:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

enblethen wrote:

I email many of the Canadian Provinces tourism office and received good information. At times too much.
British Columbia is well covered in books about the Alaska Highway such as The Milepost. Alberta is partly covered in The Milepost as well.


Yep, as this post says ask: "name of province + tourism". If you have special things you like to do a call to the 800 is what I find is best.

& there are parts of provinces where you can 'boondock' or just park, providing you have the equipment for 'dry camping' I have a truck camper. In 2015 I did 18,000 kilos maritimes to Alaska and back and only stayed in a 'campground' about 6 or 7 times. & that also comes under the heading 'ask locals'

[emoticon]

* This post was edited 12/08/16 05:59pm by Little Kopit *


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tenbear

Northern Vermont, USA

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Posted: 12/08/16 07:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have never booked campgrounds in advance unless I was going to a special event and wanted to be in a certain place on a certain date. We have camped in Canada many times. This past summer we took a tour of New Brunswick in mid to late August and never booked in advance and never had a problem getting a site.

We usually stop traveling about 3pm and often make a point to spend Friday and Saturday in the same CG.


Class C, 2004/5 Four Winds Dutchman Express 28A, Chevy chassis
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Camped in 45 states, 7 Provinces and 1 Territory


bcbouy

pitt meadows british columbia

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Posted: 12/08/16 10:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

if you want to get an idea of british columbia camping look at discover camping, bc adventure network and rec sites and trails websites.they also have pics of most of the campgrounds.

* This post was edited 12/08/16 11:15pm by bcbouy *


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Allworth

Orlando, FL

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Posted: 12/09/16 01:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Last year we were in the Maritimes and Quebec for five weeks.

Commercial campgrounds are just like in the States. Online reservations are just like any other CG.

In Quebec almost everybody speaks English, even if they claim only French. You can always just keep repeating "English? English?". They want your money and somebody will tell you how much.


Hydro Canada went low voltage on us twice. An EMS is a good investment. Progressive is the best.

Be sure you have at least one credit card that that does not charge a fee for Canadian Dollar transactions. Ask your bank. BoA World MasterCard is one.

Have fun.


Formerly posting as "littleblackdog"
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garmp

St Louis, MO

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Posted: 12/09/16 03:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In Sept, we just stuck our toes, so to speak, into Canada. By that I mean we didn't go very far, only up to Agawa Provincial Park from the midwest US, but loved it. Only thing to be aware of is the electrical supply is quite a distance from the camp site. We actually chose our site by the electric proximity among other considerations. A couple across the road from us had to use their 15 amp extension cord just to reach their B+. Where we were one power post feed two sites.
But all in all it sure was beautiful and enjoyable.


Our Phoenix Cruiser 2100, "Bob", has turned us from campers into RVers and loving it!

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