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 > Towing in snow?

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el.jefe

Michigan

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Posted: 10/10/18 11:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not that I would ptobably make a habit of it, but does anybody ever pull their trailer in the snow? I'm planning a trip over Thanksgiving, and in Michigan and Ohio there's always the potential for snowy weather that late in November.
For those who have done it, I'd love to hear what you've learned about towing when there is snow on the ground.
Certainly the goal would be to stay on clear pavement, but what happens when you are out late in the season and wake up to snow cover?


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Jim@HiTek

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Posted: 10/10/18 11:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I know what I'd do...I'd stay put until mid day, after road crews have had the time to scrape and sand, and the sun has had the opportunity to melt what is left.

Than I'd travel, very slowly, anticipating a mile off into the distance. Exiting at truck stops to spend the night if I don't get far enough to find another RV park...which tend to be clustered every 200 miles along interstates.

Finally, I'd find a place to stop early. Between 2pm and 4pm. Then use the generator for power if I can't find a RV park and tether the phone to my computer so I could get online, checking all the local news for weather reports.

I've done snow travel in a RV before, and it's exhausting.


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gbopp

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Posted: 10/10/18 11:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jim@HiTek wrote:

I know what I'd do...I'd stay put until mid day,

Finally, I'd find a place to stop early. Between 2pm and 4pm.

You're only going to travel a very short distance between mid day and 2pm. [emoticon]

donn0128

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Posted: 10/10/18 11:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Depends. Around here your required to use drag chains if chains are needed.


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Dick_B

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Posted: 10/10/18 12:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We experienced a snowstorm while on the road in Kentucky and it was so bad we couldn't see the exits so we had to keep going. I vowed never again.


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Posted: 10/10/18 12:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here's a few items to consider:

1. Slow down, you don't make miles if you're sitting in the ditch.

2. Slow down before the corners, especially the sharper ones. I've seen way too many people towing with light short wheel base 1/2T trucks that when they get to a sharp corner, they let off of the gas and use the brakes very quickly. What usually happens is the trailer weight is greater than the truck so it keeps pushing straight ahead usually jack knifing the the truck and TT pushing both into the ditch. Yes, you're towing with a LB 3/4T so you're much better off, but don't try to slow down suddenly in the sharper corners.

3. On the TT brake controller, you might want to lessen the brake setting a little bit. Where you have it set for dry pavement may allow the the TT tires to lock up and slide on slippery snow.

4. If you don't have lots of weight in the back of your truck, put some in it.

5. Traveling at night might be a better option. Note that I said "might be" because a lot of the traffic should be off of the road. You're not only watching out for yourself, but all of the crazies in their new SUVs with crappy all-season tires that are going way too fast and can't stop until they hit something.

6. Speaking of bad all-season tires, if you're going to be in the snow, you might consider putting a good set of real snow tires on the rear of your truck if you don't have them. You can always take your other tires with you can have them changed when you get down south.

Bill


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time2roll

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Posted: 10/10/18 12:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Carry chains and go slow. Same precautions as not towing.


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crosscheck

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Posted: 10/10/18 02:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We headed out of Coldstream October 2nd towing our Creekside TT up #97, eventual destination Smithers. Good time of the year to see our son's family and fish for steelhead in the Bulkley river. It's about a 12 hour trip if you take it easy. Weather generally good as there are not any real high passes to traverse.

Still have summer tires on, weather good when we left. Stopped in Cache Creek and watched the south bound ice coated trucks and RV's that the hunters were driving cruising by.. Stop to talk to a Greyhound driver who had just come down from the north. His bus had a 3" coating of ice and snow on it. Said all of the semis were chaining up and he would not recommend starting off at this time as there are 2 climbs before you are up on the plateau.

Looked at the weather and it said that after Lac La Hache, everything was clear even sunny. Decided to head out. Drove up to Clinton and the snow was on the ground but highway was just wet. Kept climbing until we got to Big Bar where this photo was taken. About 12" of snow in the fields and the north and southbound lanes where solid compact snow/ice. 1 1/2 hours in 4x4 at 60km/hr. Temps= -3C so the snow was a bit slick. Trucks were in the ditches all over the place because if you decided to pull over onto the paved shoulder, the snow would pull your wheels into the ditch.

The ice finally turned to slush after 100 Mile House and after that , the roads where just wet. Stopped off at the Quesnel Walmart and had a nice overnight stay(-7C), then an uneventful day to Smithers.



[image]

Just near the Chasm turn off, #97. Still had the climb up to Begbie summit. Do not try this at home kids. I have driven hundreds of hours on snow covered roads but this is the first time pulling a TT and with summer tires to boot. This was no picnic.

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Bedlam

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Posted: 10/10/18 02:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

1. Carry chains for your tow vehicle and trailer whether you plan to use them or not because the weather may have different plans.

2. I actually boost the brake bias to the trailer slightly so it drags the tow vehicle rather than pushing and jack knifing the tow vehicle.

3. Drive slower and smoother with no sudden changes to speed or direction.

4. Watch for others much farther down your sight path because you will not be able to react to their actions as quickly.

5. Try to avoid stops on uphill slopes and anticipate traffic lights and flow by adjusting your speed so you do not have to come to a complete stop.

6. In slick conditions, tow/haul mode and exhaust brakes may be too rough in transitions, so you may need to drive with these off.


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camperdave

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Posted: 10/10/18 03:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My guideline is to not do it if I don't have to.

If I do have to, go slow and easy. No sudden movements. I carry chains for my van and cables for the trailer. Only needed them once (needed in the sense that the chp made us put them on) and it was fine. Just took it slow and followed a truck. I wouldn't do it on purpose though, definitely more stressful. It's supposed to be fun, right?

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