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 > Your search for posts made by 'Lessmore' found 411 matches.

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RE: 2015 V6 truck comparison

They all have decent performance...at least IMO. One thing, I like though, is the vehicle good looking. If I pass it in a parking lot and find myself involuntarily looking back that's a good sign. There's only two in that group, that pass the 'look test' for me. The new Colorado and then the 4 door Ram. I've noticed as of late, there seems to be a real buzz going around from car/truck buffs who are impressed with the new Chevy Colorado.
Lessmore 01/26/15 10:41pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

Here's my H.P.-Torque--gearing story.. Can any of you older timers here remember the 300 CID straight 6 Ford engine from the 70s-80s? I don't know or recall the HP or torque ratings but we sold them in early 70s to a mining company in F350 dually cab n chassis config and they added heavy bodies to them. They climbed daily up out of the open pit ore mine. They had lotsa torque and not a lot of HP as I recall. Fast forward to about 1978. I am ordering an E150 cargo van to convert to a camping/hippy mobile for our family of 4... I ordered the trusty 300 six, manual 4 speed with OD, and about a 2;25 axle ratio. I figured with the torque that 6 had, this thing would go down the road at bout 1500 RPM and get decent mileage to boot. DID NOT WORK. :@ Would loose speed once into OD. Because the manual OD was all new, I didn't realize how bad it would affect final ratio. Luckily a friend had opposite problem. He had F150 302V8 with about a 3:75 gear ratio with 3 spd auto. Lotsa power, no speed and high RPM We switched gear balls and both our situation vastly improved. Point of my story.. The torque don't matter.. The HP don't matter.. The final ratio don't matter.. UNLESS they are all matched properly Agreed. Gearing, torque/hp, powerband, # of gears...and actual ratios of transmission are important. Having it all match is also imperative, for the type of performance you want. I drove a '70 commercial Econoline E 300 (one ton) with the 300 inline six, many years ago. Think the payload was around 4300 lbs. That big inline six, I felt had more low end and mid range torque than another Ford E 300 we had, that was equipped with a 302 V8. That big Ford straight six, was as reliable as a Swiss watch and as durable as an anvil. Apologies to Uncle Tom McCahill. :B We couldn't kill it and unfortunately it didn't get good maintenance, just hard service. A great engine. Think my '70 was rated at about 170 hp and around 270-280 lbs. ft. of torque. This was the old rating system.
Lessmore 01/26/15 06:22pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

http://www.viamotors.com/ Interesting article.
Lessmore 01/25/15 03:00pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

About 10 years or so ago I recall reading an article in Popular Mechanics about gas electric power for a Class 8 highway tractor. It used a Chevy 4300cc industrial V6 (the old Chevy V8 with 2 cylinders cut off ) engine. The 4.3 V6 charged large batteries that powered a large powerful electric motor that powered the class 8 . The 4.3 Chevy didn't do the heavy work of moving 80,000 lbs of load....the electric motor did that. The Chevy engine charged the batteries that powered the electric motor. Again kind of like a diesel electric in a train locomotive. The beauty was that the only liquid fuel used was for the Chevy engine. From what I recall, I think the Chevy engine wasn't running all the time, it only ran when the batteries were low. I think there might of been also a charging system that worked...without the V6...that charged the batteries when the truck was moving. I read this article about a decade ago, so I can't attest to the accuracy of my recollection. About 10 years or so ago I recall reading an article in Popular Mechanics about gas electric power for a Class 8 highway tractor. It used a Chevy 4300cc industrial V6 (the old Chevy V8 with 2 cylinders cut off ) engine. The 4.3 V6 charged large batteries that powered a large powerful electric motor that powered the class 8 . The 4.3 Chevy didn't do the heavy work of moving 80,000 lbs of load....the electric motor did that. The Chevy engine charged the batteries that powered the electric motor. Again kind of like a diesel electric in a train locomotive. The beauty was that the only liquid fuel used was for the Chevy engine. From what I recall, I think the Chevy engine wasn't running all the time, it only ran when the batteries were low. I think there might of been also a charging system that worked...without the V6...that charged the batteries when the truck was moving. I read this article about a decade ago, so I can't attest to the accuracy of my recollection. Also, wonder why this locomotive idea...didn't catch on for for highway tractors' motive power ? Les Les, It is easy to see why the industry did not embrace any kind of hybrid truck technology. Industry is extremely reluctant to invest in new technology unless forced to by government (emissions stuff) or they clearly see a value to them (cost, reliability, longevity, etc.). Diesel technology is/was working just fine. It is reliable, lasts a long time, mechanics know how to work on them, and they are everywhere. Who in any trucking business that is trying to make money will take such a huge plunge into a new technology type of truck without assurances that it can work, that it will last a long time, that it will make them money and that it can be fixed by many mechanics anywhere? Bean counters make decisions, too. They know what it costs to run a diesel, they had no idea how hybrid technology would work. Maybe today things would be a little different with many successful hybrid cars on the road. But that was then, this is now. The truck manufacturer would have to assure that the hybrid technology provides something better in value to them than diesel. That might be hard to prove. Who wants to buy into untested technology in the trucking world? The manufacturer would likely have to give a trucking company ten or so to test over the road and that would give real world values as to a comparison of technologies and whether hybrids are really better. The VW TDI Jetta gets as good as or perhaps even better mileage than a Prius and does not have an $8000 battery to go bad. There are advantages to diesel. I agree completely with your view. I also think that there is at this point, no reason to look at different alternatives than diesel for the trucking industry. As you have indicated, the current system works extremely well and there are all sorts of support systems in place. Les
Lessmore 01/25/15 02:54pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

The 4.3 Chevy didn't do the heavy work of moving 80,000 lbs of load....the electric motor did that. The Chevy engine charged the batteries that powered the electric motor.I am thinking that 4.3 was running close to flat out during most practical use. Sure they could turn it off as a demonstration in a proof of concept. Moving 60,000+ pounds across country that 4.3 is not going to get a rest. If I recall...and it was a long time ago I read the article...the industrial Chevy 4.3 was tuned and governed to run at 2000 rpm. I understand your point though, that if it (4.3) had to run constantly to charge the batteries, when the truck was moving...it might be lucky to get around 22-25 mpg at a constant 2000 rpm . Maybe. But even at 20-25 MPG and being the sole liquid fuel engine on the truck, that would be better than the 7-8 MPG (my guess) that the large 12-15 liter truck diesel would get, that the 4.3liter Chevy would replace. However, if the small gas engine would have to continue to run to charge the batteries, when the highway tractor was stationary of course that would eat into the overall MPG. However perhaps an electrical plug in charger, could substitute as the charging system's power source at that point. As with any newer system there would be 'bugs' to work out. But I do think emulating a railway diesel-electrical system for highway use, could potentially realize savings.
Lessmore 01/25/15 02:47pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

So why don't trucking companies use a couple light weight Eco motors: remove 1 big heavy expensive oil change diesel that makes 450hp & 1650lb-ft of torque that doesn't matter... replace with 2 x 365HP Eco's that would make 730hp, but still deliver 420lbs-ft of torque down the drive line... but that doesn't matter - so this arrangement will "smoke" the big lazy 15 litre ISX ... right? Think of the payload increase getting that 3000lbs diesel out of there...The change will come with a 400 hp electric motor combined with a smaller diesel or even natural gas. Electric will draw on the lithium battery to climb and will be used to recharge and provide braking on the decent. I think Greyhound had some buses with two engines back in the 1960s. Apparently that did not pan out for low cost. About 10 years or so ago I recall reading an article in Popular Mechanics about gas electric power for a Class 8 highway tractor. It used a Chevy 4300cc industrial V6 (the old Chevy V8 with 2 cylinders cut off ) engine. The 4.3 V6 charged large batteries that powered a large powerful electric motor that powered the class 8 . The 4.3 Chevy didn't do the heavy work of moving 80,000 lbs of load....the electric motor did that. The Chevy engine charged the batteries that powered the electric motor. Again kind of like a diesel electric in a train locomotive. The beauty was that the only liquid fuel used was for the Chevy engine. From what I recall, I think the Chevy engine wasn't running all the time, it only ran when the batteries were low. I think there might of been also a charging system that worked...without the V6...that charged the batteries when the truck was moving. I read this article about a decade ago, so I can't attest to the accuracy of my recollection. Also, wonder why this locomotive idea...didn't catch on for for highway tractors' motive power ? Les
Lessmore 01/25/15 12:55pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

Back in the 1960's and well before, our city had trolley buses that were powered by relatively big electric motors, nothing else. The electric motors apparently had maximum torque at zero rpm. I never quite understood this. I think what it meant was that the these electric motors powering the buses had their max torque from the time the engines started their revolving. But I'm not sure ? I do know that a large city bus, full of passengers, both sitting and aisle standing would top out at around 95-100 people. I know this, for as a teenager back then, I worked for the transit authority, counting passenger loads, checking schedule times, run and bus numbers. What I'm saying is that large buses, including both electric and diesel back then, had to move a lot of weight....both in weight of vehicles and with a max load of passengers. The buses in the transit fleet back then, included GMC diesel, Canadian Car diesel, Mitsubishi V8 diesels (beautiful big block V8 sound) and electric powered buses. The electric buses seemed to have far more power and acceleration then any of the diesels...although the Mitsubishi diesel V8 was no sluggard. So how does the horsepower/torque and maximum torque at zero rpm (?) for an electric motor fit into this whole thing ?
Lessmore 01/25/15 08:25am Tow Vehicles
RE: Any Ford enthusiasts here????

I was thinking the same.
Lessmore 01/23/15 10:25pm Around the Campfire
RE: Inexpensive Hearing Aids

Have you checked Costco ?
Lessmore 01/23/15 07:54am Around the Campfire
RE: 1966 LeMans winning GT40 to be restored!!!!

Always thought the Ford GT 40...the original...was one of the most beautiful of racing cars. I have heard that Dan Gurney ...the tallest of the racing drivers was 6'3" compared to the other racing drivers who were around 5' 8". Dan had difficulty fitting in the car...he was too tall and his head/helmet hit the roof. Ford's solution ? They put a bulge in the roof of the Ford GT 40 that he drove...so that his tall height could be accommodated.
Lessmore 01/22/15 03:55pm Around the Campfire
RE: Any Ford enthusiasts here????

I checked the link and saw a vehicle I didn't realize was being made. The Ford GT. Looks like the GT 40, but I have to admit I prefer the original GT 40 of the 1960's and then the GT 40 (was that it's name ?) of the earlier 2000's. But it still looks quite nice. One thing I'm missing is the powerful V8 engines that the earlier cars had. Yeah I know the 3.5 turbo V6 puts out 600 HP....but to my old ears, there's nothing like the sound of a V8 in a high powered sports machine. The new 2015 Explorer seems quite nice. Coincidentally, I checked one out on the Ford of Canada site last week. I like the interior very much.
Lessmore 01/18/15 08:47am Around the Campfire
RE: Old weathered rifle found leaning against tree

A fascinating story, thanks for telling it. I'm a bit of a history buff, I've spent some time looking at the history from the region that encompasses, southern Manitoba, southern Sask., North and South Dakota, Montana and southern Alberta. Since I've retired I've checked out the history and visited these areas. The regional history is tremendous and I find there is a treasure trove of stuff that happened...or may have happened. Everything from theories of possible early Viking visits to old west stuff that took place,but isn't well known. When I saw and posted this article, it made me think about the 400 Winchester Model 1876 carbines (45-75) that the North West Mounted Police (now known as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police) ordered from Winchester Arms back around 1885. I think these rifles were modernized 1873 repeaters. They served the mounties well and for a long time and were considered better than the previous NWMP rifle, which I believe were ex British Army guns. Les
Lessmore 01/15/15 10:49pm Around the Campfire
Old weathered rifle found leaning against tree

If only old rifles could talk. Weathered rifle made in 1882 found leaning against tree If only old rifles could talk...what kind of story would this rifle have ? I wonder when and by who and why this rifle was abandoned ? Leaving a valued weapon in this fashion, makes me wonder what happened to the owner...or at least the user, in case the two are different individuals ?
Lessmore 01/15/15 04:29pm Around the Campfire
RE: Subaru Did What GM Wouldn't

Subaru did what was required by the Federal govt. and if they didn't they would be subject to huge penalties....as per Honda...recent $ 70 million for not following process per the US Federal requirements. Your headline about GM, gives a twist to the story that isn't there. The feds are cracking down on manufacturers and they are responding...only because of fear of huge penalties. Good for the feds. Rusted out brake lines are common on GM trucks from the 90's and 00's, while the other big 2 used coated steel instead of uncoated untreated steel like GM. Failures are widely documented, but because of GM's huge sales vs. Subaru's smaller sales, the failure rate likely didn't trigger the NHTSA % number for a mandatory recall. Shame on GM for using stainless on the exhaust but not the brake and fuel lines. I think you are employing some assumptions here.
Lessmore 01/12/15 02:41pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Subaru Did What GM Wouldn't

We almost bought a Subaru XV Crosstrek when we were shopping for a small SUV. Only the antiquated infotainment system made it lose out to the Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk we bought. That said, I have read some disturbing things about oil consumption issues with Subaru engines, and friends of ours who own one (2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek) have had issues with oil consumption right from new. Apparently, Subaru is rebuilding engines in some with new piston rings to reduce oil usage. Kind of glad we went with Jeep now, though the Subaru would have got better mpg as it has a 2.0L Boxer 4 cyl with ~125 less hp than our Jeep's V6. Interesting about oil consumption. Previously I had been looking at Subaru...the Outback. During my research I also recall hearing about some oil consumption issues. I own a 2014 Outback LTD with the 2.5l 4 cyl. In 16,000 mi I haven't added a drop of oil between oil changes. I owned a Honda Accord, that was a HUGE user of oil, and it had 49,000 mi. on it when I got rid of it. Same here, had a 2013 outback 3.6R Limited, now have a 2014 Forester XT. Not a single drop of oil added. I also own 2003 WRX. Same thing. Subaru is still having record sales.. While I have heard of the odd car having those issues. It's no different than any other manufacturer. I would recommend you check the internet. I was considering purchasing a new Outback. Before I purchase anything,whether it's a fridge, camera or a car, I check reviews, issues, concerns about the product. I try to use a variety of sources, the internet being only one. I'm not a mechanic, so like many consumers I have to rely on others' experiences. Oil issue
Lessmore 01/12/15 11:11am Tow Vehicles
RE: Polar Vortex... baah

Low -30...with a wind chill - 40....that's Winterpeg tonight. The city with the dubious honor of being the coldest large city (over 600,000 pop.) in the world.
Lessmore 01/11/15 09:47pm Around the Campfire
RE: Wards does not like the Eco-Boost

The EcoBUST engine MUST run in derated mode when not using BOOST. An N/A DFI engine can have a compression above 12:1 even 14:1 in some cases (Mazda). Whereas a BOOSTED DFI engine MUST be derated, ~10:1 CR, in cruise, off-boost mode. Most engines run in cruise mode 98% of the time. Ford's EcoBUST FE problem is compounded by the fact of the CAC collecting water and oil as an emulsion in the bottom of the CAC outflow endcap. Roll a perfectly good EcoBUST engine out of the factory door, within just a few miles engine components will begin to fail (bent connecting rods) due to (partial) hydro-locking. Ward, Don't you think you were a little hard on the beave last night? LMAO - I wonder if he ever actually said that. :B I agree, I got a chuckle out of the response too. But a small detail....it wasn't 'he' who said it....it was Barbara Billingsley who played the Beav's mother...Mrs. June Cleaver.
Lessmore 01/10/15 01:53pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Subaru Did What GM Wouldn't

We almost bought a Subaru XV Crosstrek when we were shopping for a small SUV. Only the antiquated infotainment system made it lose out to the Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk we bought. That said, I have read some disturbing things about oil consumption issues with Subaru engines, and friends of ours who own one (2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek) have had issues with oil consumption right from new. Apparently, Subaru is rebuilding engines in some with new piston rings to reduce oil usage. Kind of glad we went with Jeep now, though the Subaru would have got better mpg as it has a 2.0L Boxer 4 cyl with ~125 less hp than our Jeep's V6. Interesting about oil consumption. Previously I had been looking at Subaru...the Outback. During my research I also recall hearing about some oil consumption issues.
Lessmore 01/09/15 05:53pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Subaru Did What GM Wouldn't

Issued recalls for 199,000 vehicles with rusty brake lines. Subaru did what was required by the Federal govt. and if they didn't they would be subject to huge penalties....as per Honda...recent $ 70 million for not following process per the US Federal requirements. Your headline about GM, gives a twist to the story that isn't there. The feds are cracking down on manufacturers and they are responding...only because of fear of huge penalties. Good for the feds.
Lessmore 01/09/15 11:05am Tow Vehicles
RE: $75 on a truck that lasted 38 years

I'm calling bull on the maintenance cost also. A set of tires is going to run $4-500. Assuming a new set every 10yrs (even if they don't wear out they will rot away after long enough), that is already $1600-2000. Some buy used tires for a lot less. Given the type of back yard repairs that have been done on the old Chevy, it wouldn't be surprising to me if the tires used...are used. If he is going only 1.5 miles to work and I bet a lot of that travel is about 30 mph or so, tires will last a long time.
Lessmore 01/06/15 06:16pm Tow Vehicles
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