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 > Your search for posts made by 'NinerBikes' found 1424 matches.

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RE: Paging Mena661

okay I'm $1.61 more broke with a Polish dog and a refill on the soft drink and about $191 poorer after picking up a Samsung 24 inch, it looks like the amps on it is very low and it also does have a 14 volt brick, which is another consideration in the savings I'll get when I won't have to power up my 150 watt inverter. I can then plug in directly to 12 volt cig lighter type power outlet. Moar Amps savings, if it works with 12. Think it will.
NinerBikes 10/23/14 01:19pm Tech Issues
RE: Mean Well power supply for my usage

Whether the cells are bubbling or not is a good clue as to where the charging percentage is at the moment. I love wind up timers for this chore, they are available from 15 minute to 12 hours models. Has ANYONE put the MegaWatt unit on the treadmill so far? I may have missed the report. Could you be more specific? Putting it on the tread mill, as in with an oscilloscope, or what?
NinerBikes 10/23/14 12:07pm Tech Issues
RE: Paging Mena661

Thanks Mena, for opening up our eyes about energy conserving LCD TV's. That's one of my bigger amp draws on my battery... Now, how about low amp consumption water pumps and air fans??? ;-) We are getting more efficient, bit by bit.
NinerBikes 10/23/14 11:55am Tech Issues
RE: Charging 4 12-volt house batteries with portable charger

I posted a long time ago about the big losses from successive 50-90s and did some additional trails testing on that "progressive capacity loss" http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/24849190.cfm I found that after about five 50-90s the capacity was down too far to get through the next night. The limit being you need enough to get through that night so you can do another 50-90 next morning. Since the regular time we needed a 50-90 was every two days with our particular AH usage, that meant the time limit was ten days to two weeks and we were stuck. Next step was go home and do "recovery" on the batteries whose SG was so low you couldn't even find it :) Mex is right about the fun it is to do a "recovery" Takes a few days before you can go off-grid again for another ten days or so. One night with hook-ups is not enough time to do a "recovery" The cure was solar. Shallow cycles and reaching high SOC (but not necessarily to full) means you can go weeks and weeks off-grid and not have progressive capacity loss that you will ever notice. Even so you should do an equalization every month to make sure you can still get back to "baseline SG" I may still be a little confused about this 'progressive capacity loss issue', and am finding difficulty in phrasing my question(s). Please keep in mind I have no experience with dealing with this, as I was, if anything, over-charging with my peak 40, and never did below a 97-100% re-charge; usually ~ 85-100's every other day. This progressive loss, is it due to sulfation, or some other related chemical reaction/phenomenon, or is it simply a matter of say using 50%, replacing only 45%, then again using 50% of that, and again replacing only 45%, and so on, until you simply run out of available power? Thanks! It's in the nature of battery chemistry. The plates on your battery are like the bowl of a bong... it gets' really sticky down there, with regular use, residue (sulfur in the case of your battery plates) sticking to the Lead Oxide. The plates need exposure to battery acid, sulfur build up from incomplete full top off recharges prevents that, kind of forms a chemical barrier, clogging up all the nooks and crannys. When this happens, you lose battery capacity. It's like letting bathroom shower tiles and grout go with a thorough cleaning from time to time. So you bring an aggressive cleaner in and lay on the elbow grease to get things spic and span. How do you do this with a battery? The light cleaning version, or regular cleaning, is a top charge. Charge with 15.0V until the amps drop way, way, way low. If you got lazy, and didn't do enough 15.0V scrubbings between normal usage, now you have to do the heavy duty Mr. Clean version on your lead plates. First you do the regular cleaning with 15.0V, as much as it will take. Let it sit for an hour after that is finished. Then you do the hard core cleaning with an Equalization charge. You try to charge at constant amps c/20 rate, and apply 16.0V at the equalizer charger, and measure voltage at the battery terminal for variance. You want one of two things to happen in 30 minutes to 2 or 3 hours. Either your SG reaches 1.275 or better on the Weak sister cell, matching all it's brothers, or the voltage at the battery terminals reaches 16.0V. When either of those two happen, while you watch Mr.Clean cleaning like a peregrine falcon, you pull the plug on the EQ charger. Really, it is that easy, when you are dry camping or off the grid. Some folks just skip the charge controller on their solar panel to do an equalization. Others get an old fashioned manual charger to 'git 'er done". The key is the ability to change the charging voltage manually, and keep an eye on things manually when doing the cleaning jobs... there just flat is no "set it and forget it" gizmo that will do it right... it's one of those types of jobs where if you want it done right, you have to flat out do it yourself. With just a single Screwy T-1275 battery, or Screwy group 31 battery, I can see the SG on my 3 year old battery drop off with a Top Charge 15 to 20 points in 7 days of use. I might get 1.255 to 1.260 SG readings, when 1.275 is what I see after a good through 60 to 90 minute equalization. If your run group 27, 29 or 31 batteries, or a T -1275, pretty much anything in a car battery shape that is not really really tall, chances are good you have a Screwy battery that is a major PIA to top charge and to equalize, and it becomes much much more critical to stay on top of the maintenance scrubbing and cleaning/ top charging /equalization of your batteries. Sorry, it's just the nature of the design of the batteries, other priorities took place in their design over form following function. The T-105 and T-16's, however are the cats meow for easy cleaning and maintenance. Ask anyone that has dry camped and owned and charged /maintained them.
NinerBikes 10/23/14 11:30am Tech Issues
RE: Paging Mena661

Thank you for the in depth advice and the prompt reply, much appreciated! I might head down to Costco and look at some of the Samsung offerings also. Samsung 28" rating. Vizio 28" ratings
NinerBikes 10/23/14 10:50am Tech Issues
RE: Charging 4 12-volt house batteries with portable charger

* Stockholm syndrome, or capture-bonding, is a psychological phenomenon in which hostages(non-boondockers) express empathy and sympathy and have positive feelings toward their captors(13.6vabs converters), sometimes to the point of defending and identifying with them. Jrny-pedia.;) I'm more into whipping it good. 14.8V if they've been good, tweak that PWM charge controller to 15.0V if their SG reads like a bad report card, grades are too low. Then it's time to crack that whip. Is that waterboarding your batteries into submission, or really just pouring the fridge's contents down a group of teenage boys gullet? I suggest Flogging Molly daily with 14.8V on the solar gig, and give her 15V every 10 to 14 days, with the previous night going really light on the electrical power consumption before you crank it up the following morning to top 'er off.
NinerBikes 10/23/14 10:25am Tech Issues
Paging Mena661

What make and model LCD TV is it that you are using that draws 2 amps? Thanking you in advance.
NinerBikes 10/23/14 10:06am Tech Issues
RE: Time to charge a bank of 8 6v batteries using a generator

88 dollars more in Cheapowatts. Six X 25 = 150 amps. Houses down here have 30-amp breakers. The 2 watt 10 turn pot can handle the gang of six while individual 10 turn cermets on the units will allow precision balance tweaking of voltage settings. (Toccata and Fugue in D Minor -Bach) I just have to make sure I don't run into a battery bank that'll suck this puppy's guts out. Oops, is this in the right thread, Mex?
NinerBikes 10/23/14 09:55am Tech Issues
RE: ZAMP solar - good/bad?

I was shocked (pun intended) last time I was dry camping on the Madison River in MT. The gent next to me had an eighty watt Zamp portable unit that I believe he said he paid $400 + for. There's 120 watt portable units now on Ebay for $250,if you want to wait to have it shipped on a slow boat from China. All the material and where it's made comes from China, on these portables. Some American Entepreneurs just stick their label on in after importing it and warehousing it. That makes the price pop up keystone.
NinerBikes 10/23/14 09:06am Tech Issues
RE: Looking for the perfect place to winter

There is no such thing as the PERFECT place, but we think Yuma AZ comes close. Seriously? Been there twice, first time great, second time BORING, never will go back, you have to get out more often! Why was the first time great?
NinerBikes 10/23/14 08:51am Snowbirds
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

UGH! In my first post I said that I just bought a state of the art MPPT charge controller. So now I am supposed to trade it in on a 50 dollar PWM Chinese knockoff? ? ? ? ? I have also mentioned numerous times that I cannot match my two 120 watt panels for multiple reasons! A prior poster questioned why I would run my panels in series when My batteries are in parallel. DOUBLE UGH! Of course my batteries are in parallel, I said so in my first post when I said I was running dual group 27 Trojans! Triple UGH! Completely obvious and totally irrelevant. Its a camper for crying out loud not a cabin. http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/QM8zdrY8HHA/maxresdefault.jpg So you bought a top of the line MPPT charge controller for $250, for a camper, when you have two mismatched 120W panels no longer made, and a 50W panel. A PWM would have handled all of that, no problem, with no ill effects... run them all the panels parallel, tie them in whereever,either at the input side of the controller, or at another junction box. 10 ga wire panels to controller will handle all the amps. You sir quite obviously cannot read. Which is of course why you should not post replies to threads that YOU DO NOT READ! ! ! ! ! MY TWO 120 WATT PANELS ARE PERFECTLY MATCHED! What don't you understand about that? I then said on numerous occasions that I cannot put up another matching 120 watt panel because A they are 72 cells and no longer made & B I don't have the room READ AND COMPREHEND! You are the one that brought in the pablum of why I would run two panels in series while my batteries are in parallel. WTH ? ? ? ? You brought a completely irrelevant argument to the table and then try to make me look stupid ??? If you had read the very first post in the thread, then you wouldn't be saying silly******about how my batteries are wired or why I don't buy a 50 dollar Chinese piece of crap! For the love of God! First you post that you have two 120 watt panels hooked up to an old PWM controller. Hooked up to 12v electrical system. That's telling me that you have 36 cell panels putting out 18V. Not 72 cell panels putting out 36V. You can't put 36V into a PWM charge controller and get 14.4V or a bit more going to your batteries. Then you post you can't match them. Then you post they are perfectly matched. A few years back, folks were posting that adding watts with solar panels at a dollar a watt was making adding panels more cost effective than adding MPPT to small systems under 30 amps for 12V panels. MPPT now only makes economic sense where large 225 to 250 watt panels at higher voltages can be bought for $.70 to .80 a watt, with multiple large panels, 3, 4, 5 or a bit more. Google and Search function are your friend... it's already all in here. Posting conflicting nonsense will not make you popular around here.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 10:55pm Tech Issues
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

UGH! In my first post I said that I just bought a state of the art MPPT charge controller. So now I am supposed to trade it in on a 50 dollar PWM Chinese knockoff? ? ? ? ? I have also mentioned numerous times that I cannot match my two 120 watt panels for multiple reasons! A prior poster questioned why I would run my panels in series when My batteries are in parallel. DOUBLE UGH! Of course my batteries are in parallel, I said so in my first post when I said I was running dual group 27 Trojans! Triple UGH! Completely obvious and totally irrelevant. Its a camper for crying out loud not a cabin. http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/QM8zdrY8HHA/maxresdefault.jpg So you bought a top of the line MPPT charge controller for $250, for a camper, when you have two mismatched 120W panels no longer made, and a 50W panel. A PWM would have handled all of that, no problem, with no ill effects... run them all the panels parallel, tie them in whereever,either at the input side of the controller, or at another junction box. 10 ga wire panels to controller will handle all the amps. You sir quite obviously cannot read. Which is of course why you should not post replies to threads that YOU DO NOT READ! ! ! ! ! MY TWO 120 WATT PANELS ARE PERFECTLY MATCHED! What don't you understand about that? I then said on numerous occasions that I cannot put up another matching 120 watt panel because A they are 72 cells and no longer made & B I don't have the room READ AND COMPREHEND! You are the one that brought in the pablum of why I would run two panels in series while my batteries are in parallel. WTH ? ? ? ? You brought a completely irrelevant argument to the table and then try to make me look stupid ??? If you had read the very first post in the thread, then you wouldn't be saying silly******about how my batteries are wired or why I don't buy a 50 dollar Chinese piece of crap! For the love of God! Title of thread "How to wire 2 controllers to my battery supply?" And now you have a MPPT. and $250 plus shipping missing from your account. And 72 cells for 120 w panels, but 36 cells and 18V for the 50 w panel I'd sell the 72 cell panels, and for anything under 360 watts, I'd go to all 36 cell solar panels at 18V. What a mix and match mess. Time for a complete overhaul. Same as needing a new 200 amp main panel at home. Remodel time. I bought a brand new 150w 18V panel for $120, just the other day, I may pick up another... 300 watts, $240, out the door, brand new solar panels. 30 amp charge controller... $29, brand new. $269 for 300 watts. What am I missing here in the math? I am certain that at mid day, I'm good for 16.4 Amps at 15.0V with that set up. As has been said before, the price per watt for 36 cell solar panels now is so low that it makes MPPT controllers no longer economically viable for much under 30 amps input at 17 or 18V on a 12V system.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 09:11pm Tech Issues
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

MY TWO 120 WATT PANELS ARE PERFECTLY MATCHED! What don't you understand about that? Calm down. Some people might have difficulties with reading, and some - with counting. This is what I read in your previous post: I have also mentioned numerous times that I cannot match my two 120 watt panels for multiple reasons! . What you really meant - I guess - was that you can't match the 3rd 120W panel with existing 2*120W. One more thing - for those reading, if anybody still is :) - I noticed people saying "... this 30A controller". The OP's is 20A, not 30. It's a scaled down version of 30A Rogue. 320W max panel wattage. Funny, the opening of this whole thread asks about wiring 2 controllers, to one battery bank, does it not? So where did the fancy bank breaking MPPT enter the thread? Far cheaper to buy any other 120W panel for $150 and a $30 30 amp PWM charge controller. More amps, every single time, from adding another 6.6 amps from another 120W panel, than any mppt could make up with only 2 panels. False economy. And a triple face palm.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 09:00pm Tech Issues
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

Wiring them in series lowers the line losses between the panels and the controller (it's amperage - the flow of electrons - that's resisted - and the higher voltage - how hard those electrons are being pushed - helps too). The MPPT controller will take care of outputting the correct voltage to the batteries. When wiring different panels (or sets of panels) in parallel, the VoC should match as closely as possible. (If producing at all, most panels will produce they're rated voltage, even if they're mostly shaded and producing very low amperage.) If it doesn't, the lower of the two voltages is what will be used, with any difference wasted. When wiring different panels (or sets of panels) in series, the VoC does't matter much (with an MPPT controller) but the Imp should match as closely as possible. If they don't match the higher-current panel will end up being limited to the same amperage as the lower-current panel with the difference wasted. (If the panels don't have bypass diodes, the same thing will happen if one of the panels is shaded. Some panels, Kyocera for instance, have bypass diodes between groups of cells as well. Some of the super-cheap panels don't have bypass diodes at all.) There are many references online, some better than others, for the fun of wiring in series vs. parallel, and series-parallel. These are but a few: Solar Facts MPPT Solar Solar Panels Venue Exactly right. Not sure what the other gentleman is talking about. My batteries are 12 Volt. The camper is set up for 12 volt. Two 6 volt batteries in series are 12 volt. Meaningless for this discussion. Higher volts push more amps. I will never be able to match my two 120 watt panels. As I said before, they are no longer made and besides, I don't have the room. Mismatching panels of different size is a definite no go, so adding a third panel in parallel is a bad idea. This is a false statement, if all panels are connected in parallel, even with the 50w panel added in for the extra 2.5 amps, it will work with the other two 120w panels, with a proper PWM controller. I am well aware of what series wiring does to 12 volt batteries. Why are we talking about it? My original post was in regards to wiring a second controller. The rest is well known to me. So running my two large identical panels that suffer no shading in series thru my MPPT controller will net more power to the batteries.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 08:51pm Tech Issues
RE: Mean Well power supply for my usage

No, I am NOT looking for float! I'm looking for a charger to put in a lot of AH in 2 hours of run time on an Onan genset. Period. I gots float otherwise covered. And equalizing too. :) I gots confused by you asking so often whether the mod PM3 did float. :) The tangents make it hard to keep up. I was trying to make sure I understood what it does and doesn't do. It sounds like it would do what I want: Full amps till full volts reached, then hold the volts while amps taper. Unless it's now unreliable or flaky in some way? I would retain the regular wfco converter for converting, float charging, etc. Yes. Yes. Yes. Buy one already. Set it at 14.8V or 15.0V add wire, mount it out of the elements, close to the batteries, in storage area, and run fat wire, call it good. Your needs are the same as mine, it works fine. Always connect to the battery first before turning on the PSU.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 08:10pm Tech Issues
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

UGH! In my first post I said that I just bought a state of the art MPPT charge controller. So now I am supposed to trade it in on a 50 dollar PWM Chinese knockoff? ? ? ? ? I have also mentioned numerous times that I cannot match my two 120 watt panels for multiple reasons! A prior poster questioned why I would run my panels in series when My batteries are in parallel. DOUBLE UGH! Of course my batteries are in parallel, I said so in my first post when I said I was running dual group 27 Trojans! Triple UGH! Completely obvious and totally irrelevant. Its a camper for crying out loud not a cabin. http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/QM8zdrY8HHA/maxresdefault.jpg So you bought a top of the line MPPT charge controller for $250, for a camper, when you have two mismatched 120W panels no longer made, and a 50W panel. A PWM would have handled all of that, no problem, with no ill effects... run them all the panels parallel, tie them in whereever,either at the input side of the controller, or at another junction box. 10 ga wire panels to controller will handle all the amps.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 07:43pm Tech Issues
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

Link of studyConsider a MPPT when you get 24V panels over 200W each, or your whole solar panel setup is over 360 Watts total with 24V panels. Rogue MPPT 2024... $250 Consider a PWM charge controller if your panels are all 36 cell 12V design making 17-18V each at Max load, 22-23V unloaded. Solar 30 Adj Voltage to 15.0V PWM 12v/24v 30 amps max.... $29 No brainer, for me. Save the money on the controller and go buy another 120 watt panel, and still put some change in your pocket. BFL13 did a comparison on MPPT vs PWM, do a search and read up what his real world findings were... He doesn't have a dog in the hunt for either brands. Although not a direct comparison, you have to keep temperatures in mind when running MPPT's, they lose their gain when it gets hot, and provide less or no benefit then. If you camp spring, summer and fall, you should take that into account. Link
NinerBikes 10/22/14 06:57pm Tech Issues
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

I am after voltage. Higher voltage will push more amps into the batteries. Thus the MPPT controller. Lower line loss, and more voltage. Not sure why it matters that the batteries are in parallel. Parallel batteries means you are running two 12V batteries parallel, as in your whole electrical system is 12V based. Running parallel combines the Amp hours of the two 12V batteries. Two 110AH batteries at 12 V gives you 220AH at 12V total. If you were wired in series, your electrical system would then be 110AH, but your voltage would now be 2 x 12V, or a 24V electrical system. Since you have a 12V system, your batteries are in parallel to run everything at 12V. You need 14.8 to 15.0V to charge your 12V system. That's plenty high voltage. A Solar 30 PWM charge controller is one of those controllers that is Voltage adjustable up to 15.0V. It does 12V and 24V system charging. Solar 30 PWM adjustable charge controller You can find this exact same PWM charge controller rebranded and sold in the USA for $55-80, all day long on Ebay. You can buy this one, it's sold from Los Angeles, and it will be at your door in 3 working days, if you order first thing in the morning. I know this is true, I just bought one. It does indeed deliver 14.8, or 14.9 or 15.0V. Connect it to one positive terminal on one battery, and one negative terminal on the other battery since you are running your batteries parallel. Adding another panel to this 30 amp charge controller, regardless of size, on the input side of the solar panel, is fine... with a PWM charge controller, it is all about the AMPS of input, the charge controller takes care of the output voltage and makes it all the same, it does not have problems like a MPPT does with mismatched panels. It's about the amps on a PWM charge controller. You are making this more complex and difficult than it needs to be, when you are working with 12V solar panels in small sizes. MPPT's are for huge 200 watt plus high voltage 29V panels, to get them down to 12V usage and charging a 12V system. If you have more questions, ask BFL13 about the differences, and small charging 12v panels vs large 24V panels, where MPPT controllers become a factor. With a PWM and 12v panels, the line run is such that you can afford to lose up to 2 to 3V and not have an effect on pre voltage on the input side of the controller having an effect on the OUTPUT voltage of the charge controller. You worry about big V losses only between the output of the charge controller run to the battery terminals. You over come that loss by mounting the controller as close to the battery as possible without getting gassed by the battery, and short fat wires, to limit the loss on that wire run only.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 06:38pm Tech Issues
RE: Proper Wiring for two controllers to one battery bank

Why would you run the panels in series, when you only have 2 12v batteries to charge, and they are wired in parallel? Take both panels, in parallel and route them into a 12v PWM charge controller rated at 30 amps, in case you add one more panel. One short run of heavy thick wire from the charge controller to the paralleled 12v batteries, and you are complete.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 05:03pm Tech Issues
RE: UPDATE! Ordered a 2015 Eco-Diesel today! :)

Buddylam that is what makes the Cummins the best diesel in a pick up period! The in-line six of my 5.9 even with the 48RE was turning under 1500 RPM in OD @ 65 MPH. How is this different from the other diesels on the market, or even the EB, for that matter? My Duramax would tow up just about any interstate grade out there at 65 mph, 1600 rpm, in 6th gear. My Ecoboost tows along on flat or slight inclines at about 1700 rpm at 65 in 6th gear also. It downshifts more often than the Duramax, obviously, but it takes an actual hill to make it do it, and spends probably 90% of its time on the freeway in top gear (I do live in Utah, so we don't have long stretches w/o some sort of hill). When the EB does downshift, it is usually to 5th gear and about 2200 rpm. For what it's worth, I suspect the Ecodiesel would do about the same when towing w/in its ratings. That is one of the great things about these turbo-charged engines -- the low end torque is incredible. Compare that to my naturally aspirated V8's. My 2010 Suburban pretty much spends its life above 2500 rpm with the trailer attached. It almost never reaches 6th gear, even on flat ground, and downshifts if someone sneezes! Not necessarily a knock against it, but it needs rpms to make its power. More rpms = more parasitic drag and friction = more engine wear. Don't forget E=MC2 The engine parts load squares with increase in rpms. Side thrust from the connecting rods to the pistons, to the bore of the engine, etc. At 57-58 mph trailering, in 8th gear, my Touareg is at 1490, maybe 1500 rpms (measured it today.) I'd have to double check. Both 7th and 8th gears are overdrive, direct lock up gears, no use of the torque convertor.
NinerBikes 10/22/14 11:16am Tow Vehicles
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