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 > Your search for posts made by 'NinerBikes' found 1206 matches.

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RE: For Folks With MeanMega Well Power Supplies

How does one wire this in? On the circuit board or in line with the output? Putting up a part without a little "how to" assemble for us non EE types is a recipe for things to go kaboom. Keep in mind, Mex, not all of us have installed electrical low voltage systems in complex boats, like you.
NinerBikes 08/29/14 04:54pm Tech Issues
RE: For Folks With MeanMega Well Power Supplies

http://www.apexjr.com/images/CLAROSTAT73JA2K%20POT.jpg
NinerBikes 08/29/14 04:51pm Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

Not mounting on top of the roof. Keeping it portable.Same thing RJ said a year ago. Then the setup/down logistics apparently became a bore. Not much to talk about connections with a portable... just slap it on. I would get separate components over a kit. Bought a portable "kit" 120 watts worth. The folding panels are the only thing from the kit that I still use. Cables too small and too much resistance after the controller, the controller is the most rudimentary and basic of controllers, and marginal at best with my T-1275 battery. Scrapped all that, kept the folding panels, bought real wire, real quick disconnect high amp male and female plugs,and read, listened and observed here, and now I have something that works to my specifications, not some fake "do it all" specification, built around the lowest common denominator. I can not stress enough to get a good solar charge controller with adjustable bulk /absorption voltage set points, if you spend all your time dry camping or boondocking. That made all the difference in the world for me. Measure not only the voltage but the amperage at a given charge level. You'd be surprised how low the amps are that some of them put out while pulse charging, in 4 or 5 out of the 6 cycles of pulse.
NinerBikes 08/29/14 03:46pm Tech Issues
RE: Meanwell is here!!

1.250 SG at home a week after a baja trip. Wow,those Iota engineers got that top off charge and specific gravity after charging dialed it. Curious as to what your specific gravity was new on those batteries after completely top charging? PS... you should have been at The Wedge or K38 on Wednesday this week. Sail was optional.
NinerBikes 08/29/14 03:29pm Tech Issues
RE: Meanwell is here!!

Real Men like playing and tinkering with battery acid, measuring devices and Volts. But only in the beginning of the day, then it's on to beer, tying flys, wetting a line, taking pictures of catches, and flatulating while sleeping in a hammock after a rough day on the water, while the batteries top charge themselves.
NinerBikes 08/29/14 10:48am Tech Issues
RE: Meanwell is here!!

US Battery still comes up here: http://pdf.wholesalesolar.com/battery-folder/charging_instruction_2011_2.pdf Despite all that, I did find this summer that with long sunny days back to back and shallow cycles 85-99 whatever, the 6s did get back to baseline SG with charging only in the 14s. But this is different from recovering from 50-90s. The Eco-Worthy was set to 14.8 (inverter alarms/quits at 15v) for Vabs and as soon as the 6v batts got there, early afternoon, the controller dropped to Float at 14.4 its highest float setting (or I would have made float 14.8 to give some time at the Vabs) Getting to baseline SG now depended on it being sunny for the rest of the day and for the Trimetric to show "over" AH into the positive AHs and keep going till about 10AH or more over. (reset to zero at sundown) If the 14.4 doesn't last long enough (clouds come in) to get the AHs that much positive, the batts will not get to baseline. OK so that takes shallow cycles and a co-operative weatherman. This same regime does not work with the 12v T-1275s, which are more like the Screwy 31, needing more charging even with shallow cycles. My T-1275s are sort of beat up so can't say what nice new ones would be like. (It means my Eco-Worthy settings ranges are not right for the T-1275s so I have to by-pass the controller and go panel direct to get their voltages into the 15s on Float---so I had trouble with the T-1275s banked with the 6s. The 6s were bubbling away losing water while the T-1275s were not up to speed yet late in the day. Got tired of watering the 6s, decided to give them a rest, and am now operating solely on the two T-1275s, which are doing great with the occasional run up into the 15s as mentioned. With even one 50-90, the SG on the 6s gets into the red and is moreso after several 50-90s in a row. Now you have to do some serious work to get the SG back up to baseline including the finish and equalize into the 15s. However this is so easy with the 6s and a VEC1093DBD, it is no big deal. It was pure agony with my 27DCs though--never again! Yes to 6s! :) So it is way different between deep and shallow cycles, battery type, and whatever the weatherman decides you are entitled to that day. Which is why I always state T-1275s for specifying what type of battery I run... and it may also explain why they aren't the best power for golf carts, when they can be problematic and have a strict routine to make them behave properly. My T-1275's were free.... if I'd paid for them and had to do this kind of baby sitting on a $ per amp hour ratio, I'd own a pair of GC-2's in a heartbeat. That mine were free lets me put up with their aberrant top charging and equalizing behavior a bit easier. Plus, I got an education for free on one of the toughest batteries around to get whipped into shape, GC-2s should be easy peasy.
NinerBikes 08/29/14 10:34am Tech Issues
RE: Meanwell is here!!

how often are you replacing water at these 16v charge rates? and what do you guys do when you disconnect the battery's when charging for power? and how do you guys know when your done with this 16v charge? simply checking the SG? Do a search on "Equalization" by Mexicowanderer. The write up is complete. Maybe ask a Moderator to make it a sticky. Too many here that have had tough batteries to get the proper performance out of due to use of a 14.4v charge controller off the grid with their own portable generator have found it to be spot on. Seek, and ye shall find. In general, if you are doing short, infrequent Equalization charges, to max your specific gravity out and your voltage to 16.0 at the prescribed amperage C/20... you should lose very, very, very little water. The procedure requires a short period of time of baby sitting, until you know the routine on your battery.
NinerBikes 08/29/14 09:36am Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

The 15' cable that comes with the Renogy portables is way too short so I plan to move the controller near the batteries. I really liked someone's idea of having two different length cables with quick connects. I had already replaced the alligator clips with ring/Anderson ends. I'm debating on the portable or piecing it together. If I piece it together, I will go with some longer cable. The upside of going with the portables is that they will already be hinged together and have a built in stand. The downside is that the controller is mounted on it and thus you don't want to really have the panels too far from the batteries then. My portable I mounted controller in a box and have a foot away from batteries. Use about 20 feet of cable between panel and controller. Same idea applied here.
NinerBikes 08/29/14 09:22am Tech Issues
RE: Meanwell is here!!

IMHO, your post above was well written and outstanding re clear information transfer! I believe you've just made the point that 15.XX volts should only be applied when certain conditions have beforehand been met with the battery(ies) .... not all the time as kindof an improved boost voltage whenever one wants to charge a wet cell. I'll have to slow down in my reading, as my reading of some of MEX's posts led me to believe that he might have been advocating the use of a simple and inexpensive adjustable voltage power supply to achieve 15.XX volts at high currents for charging of wet cells each and every time you charge them. I thought that high wet cell battery charging voltages in excess of 14.XX volts were for such things as stirring the electrolyte within cells, for equalizing amoung the cells, etc., and as such was only occasionally required for wet cell battery maintenance. Boy ... am I glad I use dry cells. :S 15.0V or slightly above (US Battery specifies 15.3V) is what is required to TOP CHARGE a Trojan T-1275 or a couple of GC2 batteries. I would consider a top charge to be perhaps 97 or 98% charged, I will defer to Mexico Wanderer on that, as the SG on a 97 or 98% charged battery still has more to go... there is still some residual sulfur on the lead plates, which causes the specific gravity to not be at it's highest, where a 100% charge would be. To truly get to 100%, in my opinion, you have to get all the sulfur off the plates, which of course will probably cause the SG to be at as high as 1.280 in each cell. The only way I am aware of truly doing that is going to 16.0V from time to time, as needed, by using 16.0V at C/20 charge rate... about 10 or 11 amps continuous on a pair of GC-2s. About 7.5 amps on a 150 amp hour Trojan T-1275. About 5 Ah on a Group 29 and about 4 amps on a single Group 24, 8 amps on a pair of Group 24's. 10 amps on a pair of Group 27's or 29's. Constant amps, and let the voltage rise from 15.7 to 16.0, or until your SG stops rising. Still... it requires 16.0V. Not 14.4V, not 14.8V. That, my friends, is a true 100% charge, when your SG is = to what it was when fully charged and brand new. Around 1.280 The Hydrometer never lies. Use it. AGM's are a whole another matter. Think of amps as volume of water coming out of a car wash. Think of voltage coming out of a high pressure car washer as pressure, scrubbing the plates on your cells. In order to overcome the sticky resistance of sulfur on lead acid plates, one must add more pressure (voltage) to deep scrub the plates. You don't deep scrub wash all the time, only when it really needs it. If you keep the pressure pretty regularly at 15.0V, most days, the plates on your battery take a long time to get dirty enough to need a deep cleaning session again. Another analogy would be filling up a 210 foot (amp hour) water column, with the fitting for the filling being at the very bottom of the water column. You have all that weight of the water column, in pressure, to overcome, to fill that water column to the top. It takes pressure to overcome that water column weight, to fill up completely. Voltage increase is increasing that pressure, to overcome the weight of the water column. 16.0V worth. Listen to the battery manufacturer of industrial long life deep cycle batteries for charging voltage recommendations, not the charge controller industry. The Charge controller industry does not warranty your batteries.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 11:11pm Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

Just saw that Renogy has the same stuff on eBay but for a little less, still with free shipping. What would be the recommended length of cable for a portable set up? Would 20' suffice or would just go ahead and go longer right from the start? Run what ever length cable you want from panel to controller. Run the shortest fattest wire you can from controller to the battery. Voltage Losses are very important in the wiring, once past the controller, not so much from the panel to before the controller, there is surplus voltage there. Once past the charge controller, the needs of specific gauge wire and distances are strict. Lose V, and you lose charging capability fast due to the voltage loss.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 05:21pm Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

Hi Mex, As usual, you are the voice of sanity. MPPT is for folks who have either money to burn, have run out of roof space, or wish to extract ever possible watt of power from their system. PWM remains the way to go for battery charging (small systems). I do think that temperature compensation is a must do, especially where it is cold or hot. For that reason, I do not endorse the solar 30 unit that Niner uses to good effect. I get dizzy re-reading these three pages. What bubbles up to the surface is a couple of smaller batteries and hinges for the panels. This is not MPPT territory, sorry. I am usually one of the first to state what works for me, and I am pretty good about including the caveat... YMMV. Everyone's needs are different.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 05:14pm Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

Hi, Try this one? 30 amp controller. Of course! I would not have asked otherwise. There are many listed & I don't want to play roulette. If you have one that works well for you why not share? Thanks. Piano, it will, of course, be all your fault when that unit doesn't work out for him, for what ever reason.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 02:51pm Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

Niner, Which ebay adjustable controller did you buy? Could you post a link? That is one thing I would like to have. Did you try searching Ebay? "30 solar" find one for about $31 from china. yellow buttons, 3 of them. Thanks for all your help. Not. You edited your post after seeing mine where I said I searched ebay & there were many. Why do you even post here if you're not willing to share what works for you? Because numerous times, I have posted here what works for me, to the point of sounding like a broken record because folks like you won't use key words and the "search" function. In other words, you're lazy. The info is all over the place in here, it's not for me to hold your hand and dig around all over Ebay when you are capable of doing that yourself, but won't. Give a man a fish, you have to feed him, teach him how to fish, he can feed himself the rest of his life.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 02:16pm Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

Niner, Which ebay adjustable controller did you buy? Could you post a link? That is one thing I would like to have. Did you try searching Ebay? "30 solar" find one for about $31 from china. yellow buttons, 3 of them.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 01:25pm Tech Issues
RE: Optimum Manual Charging Scheme?

RC helicopter charge meter Same solution, you supply the electrical connectors, and pocket the difference.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 12:48pm Tech Issues
RE: Upgrading my Charge Controller

My Solar 30 is 0.1V high. Use a little thinner wire, get some voltage drop, and it should be spot on. It will read high if you use a short fat wire setup from the charge controller to the battery. I paid $31 for mine, delivered to the USA.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 12:02pm Tech Issues
RE: Meanwell is here!!

Yep ... I have the same question: How's the above different than just setting a PD unit to boost voltage as long as you want and as often as you want using it's handy-dandy remote control? .... and the PD unit can of course be built into your RV, too, in place of any stock converter that may have come in the RV. Using a separate power supply may be cheaper ... unless you can find a good deal on a new or used PD. Using a separate power supply for charging an RV battery bank may be cheaper - especially if you already own one - but of course using them takes more messing around whenever you charge the RV batteries. Hit and run RV'ing is not too compatible with messing around. Permanently squatting in a spot for weeks on end with time on one's hands may be another deal, however. I'd prefer a Parallax 7345/55 timer controlled dual voltage T unit, instead, in our RV. A PD requires constant pedestal style hookup to top charge a battery, and 3, 4, 5 days worth of time to get there, otherwise it stops short of 100% fully charged. Dry campers don't have that luxury, when a PD makes 14.4V in bulk charge, and my Trojan battery needs 15.0V or more to get things topped off. Hence the quick and dirty solution of using a variable, adjustable manual voltage switch power supply unit, as suggested by Mexicowander. Because, in my circumstances, it just flat out works better.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 11:47am Tech Issues
RE: Ebay Digital Voltmeter- How Do They Do that

The meter, was it $2.57 retail. including shipping,....how do they do that ? http://www.ebay.com/itm/DC-0-30V-Voltmeter-LED-Panel-3-Digital-Display-Volt-Voltage-Meter-for-Motorcycle-/131095052802?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e85dfc202 http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/ODAwWDgwMA==/z/7PgAAOxydlFS1~oI/$_57.JPG I just received two of these. I got one for my RV and one for my cabin. Not being to electronicaly inclined I have a question. The monitor has three wires, red, black, white. Connect red to + and black to - and the display lights up. Then connect white to + and voltage is displayed. My question is, what is the best way to wire this to a switch so the voltage is displayed with the push of a button? Thanks for any help. Place a switch in line with your red wire?
NinerBikes 08/28/14 11:40am Tech Issues
RE: Solar Charge Controller

I discovered why my multimeter wouldn't show the Short Circuit Current (SCC). The 20 amp fuse was bad. I did check behind both panel's black boxes & the connections are good. One registered Open Current Voltage (OCV) of 21.2 the other 20.8. It's rated at 21.8. The rated SCC is 7.2 amps with max output of 6.67 amp. Results: SCC from controller connection = 6.5 from 25' 18 ga = 6.7 from 22' 10 ga = 6.6 I need to make the final solder & heat shrink connections on the 10 ga. wire. I may shorten it a bit to 16-18' if that needs done & would help. Now my battery has a SOC of 87% with 12.7 v and a draw of -0.2a. When connected with the various cords my Trimetric shows: with 25' 18 ga = 13.1 v and +2.9a with 22' 10 ga = 13.2 v and +3.0a the v went up a bit the longer connected with 16' 18 ga battery clamped direct to battery = 13.3v and 3.0a. Maybe all is well & I just do not drain the battery enough to allow all the amps to charge? If you are at 87% SOC, then yes, the amps are going to drop quite a bit. The only way to get around that is to have an adjustable charge controller that you can set the bulk and absorption charge Voltages higher, to like 14.8 or 15.0V. If you do that, the amperage level will stay higher longer, and your battery's state of charge will get higher too, before going into maintenance mode and voltage drop to 13.4 -13.8V, for top charging. Which is exactly what I did with my 120W portable solar panel. I bought a Solar 30 PWM charge controller on Ebay for $31, with adjustable voltage setting for bulk, temperature controlled, and I set it at 15.0V for my Trojan T-1275, a 12V 150 Ah Sweeper/golf cart battery. I will maintain 5.5 to 6.1 amps charge rate for a long time, and it does get my battery darn near topped off, almost every single day. 6 amps for 7 hours, is about 42 Ah, plus what ever else I get at sunrise and sunset, aiming the portable panel at the sun a few times a day.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 11:32am Tech Issues
RE: Battery Tender Plus

I have one that came with a used motorcycle and I realized the same thing after trying it. I didn't know they were that pricey either. It's a keeper. I bought a Yamaha TW200 from a private party in San Diego a few years back, 330 miles on it. Came with a battery plus Junior. Don't know why but that motorcycle and it's electrics tended to really boil the water out of the battery over a gallon and a half of gas riding around. It wasn't the Junior doing it, it was the voltage regulation while riding around that was, I think, pretty poor. Electric start battery was only 7Ah on that bike. Still have the Battery Tender Jr. I've no idea if it is temp compensated.
NinerBikes 08/28/14 10:14am Tech Issues
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