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 > Your search for posts made by '4x4ord' found 292 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: rear axle gear ratio

4.10 delivers more power to the rear axle than does a 3.73 diff....that needs a little explaining.
4x4ord 12/02/16 11:34pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Looking at used Ford F-350 high miles

if you really want to talk about foolish it seems to me buying a $60000 truck that is worth $40000 when you drive off the lot isn't exactly the best use of funds especially for folks that won't get a lot of use out of it. I paid $67,500 for my Platinum and expect it will be worth about $37k in about 5 years. So about 6k per year to drive a new truck. I guess that makes taking a chance on an old $6000, 6.0 liter Ford seem like not such a bad thing to do. How much would a 10 year old Duramax cost?
4x4ord 12/02/16 08:37am Tow Vehicles
RE: rear axle gear ratio

Thanks for the replies. I'm surprised at the one reply stating less than 1 mpg difference. I'm not, I'm betting there wouldn't be anymore than that amount of difference in real world driving! I've driven both under the same conditions and there wasn't hardly a noticeable difference in mileage but the 4.10s sure roll off a lot easier. It is interesting to do the math on the overall ratio in 1st gear on different trucks with different transmissions and rear ends. For instance the 68RFE transmission offered on the Ram has a 1st gear ratio of 3.23:1. So if it has a 4.30 rear axle the final overall ratio in 1st gear is 4.3 x 3.23 or 13.89. The Aisin has a 1st gear ratio of 3.75 so an Aisin with 3.73 gears would have an overall low gear ratio of 13.99. Then consider the extra engine torque available with the Aisin transmission. 13.99 x 900 lbft = 12600 lb ft of torque. Compare that to a 2006 Ram with a 4.10 rear end and 2.45 first gear ratio and 610 lb ft engine - 6127 lbft of rear axle torque. So the Cummins/Aisin with a 3.73 rear end can put over double the toeque to its rear axle as the '06 Ram with 4.10 gears.
4x4ord 12/01/16 07:21am Tow Vehicles
RE: rear axle gear ratio

Go with 4.10s and don't fall for the hype of getting better fuel mileage with the 3.73 because you'll likely not see a difference. With the new trucks they are geared to nearly the same high gear for mileage. I'd also recommend getting the Aisin trans if they have it. Just my opinion. What do you mean by stating "with the new trucks they are geared to nearly the same high gear for mileage"?
4x4ord 12/01/16 06:36am Tow Vehicles
RE: Fiver Pin Separated From Hitch on Interstate

I have had a ball hitch tag trailer come off the ball when I neglected to lock it. We were traveling along at about 50 mph when we hit a railway crossing. It was quite rough as the truck crossed so I watched in the mirror to see how the trailer would bounce. I was visiting while hooking things up and neglected to latch the lock, hook up the safety chains or brake away cable. Anyway the trailer bounced off the ball and we were free. I just kept driving and told my wife we just lost the trailer back there. It took a bit before she realized I was serious. It probably skidded on the jack leg a quarter mile before going off into the ditch. I had to rewire the electrical plug but with the help of some passer bys we were able to lift it back on the ball and carry on. The only real damage done was to the jack.
4x4ord 11/30/16 07:38am Towing
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

Local racer uses a KW with a huge custom sleeper to tow his rail car. Licensed as an RV with "Not for hire" decals and no CDL needed. That is because it is licenced as an RV. I am talking about regular everyday DRW pickups licences as pickups and towing a trailer with a GVWR greater than 10k. Per regulation, if it has a GCWR greater than 26k, then a CDL is required. Again, recreational vehicles are different. Well if RV's are exempt than all is good. Those who need a dually to haul heavy loads are happy. Those who want a dually to haul their RV are happy. So, it's only those who want a heavy truck and trailer to drive around empty that are annoyed and I guess they can buy a GM.:)
4x4ord 11/29/16 05:50pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

I guess it depends on what state you're driving in: License requirements for RVers
4x4ord 11/29/16 04:49pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

I agree most guys are using their trucks to haul well under 30k and thats a good thing. But some of us really do use these trucks. Well you see, that is where the problem lies. Due to this proverbial pissing match between the makes, those who want these big DRW trucks just to tow their 15k trailer without a CDL are breaking the law. Most of the DRW trucks today have a GCWR of over 26,001 lbs which means towing a trailer that has a GVWR of over 10k without a CDL can lead to hefty fines in most states. They should make a DRW with a GCWR of 25,999 for those that want DRW for towing stability and don't need to tow something that heavy to need a 26k+ GCWR. CDL: A License To Tow Is it a big deal for an RVer to get a CDL? In Canada the worst thing about having a class 1 license is that after a certain age a class one driver needs to renew his/her license every couple years, which involves getting a medical and paying some fees.
4x4ord 11/29/16 02:45pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

Hauling to market is one thing but around here the farmers haul from farm to farm and they do it with their pick up trucks and I promise you a 30,000# trailer load of cattle is not uncommon behind a 1 ton truck. Even at that, my point is that RVers are NOT what these truck manufacturers are marketing to. How many 500# bails of tobacco do you think you can get on a 30' deck? Hay? Tractor with implement? Then you have construction. We pull 30,000# trailers quite often with "1 ton" trucks and cross the scales with them. Believe me, it's more common than you think and now we can do it with trucks that are "rated" by the manufactures to do it. I am curious as to what kind of trailers you use since most 32 footers are limited to 20-22k GVWR. Heck, even the commercial 40 ft stock trailers are limited to 20-24k GVWR. I know a lot of farmers who "think" they are hauling way more than they actually are mainly because most don't actually weight what they are pulling. In regards to this, I will have to see it to believe it and even then I believes that this is a very very very small percentage of farmers and ruck buyers. The vast majority(as in 99.9%) will never even come close to towing a 30k trailer and what I mean by that is a the trailer actually weighing 30k, not the truck and trailer combined weighing 30k. A combined 30k only means you are pulling a 21-22k trailer. I agree that, at the present time, the vast majority of trailers being towed by pickups is much lighter than 30,000 lbs. On the other hand it doesn't take much of a load to reach 30,000 lbs with a big truck. As the pickups become more capable they will be used more and more for these light (30,000 lb) trailers.
4x4ord 11/29/16 08:10am Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

Because rvers are not the main class of people these trucks are built for. A load of livestock can easily break 30,000lbs. I am not just an RVer either. I help my ageing father in law with his 500 acre ranch/farm with over 50+ head of cattle so I know a thing or two about hauling cattle. I will have to say that I have never ever ever in all my years seen a 30k lb load of livestock being pulled by a 1 ton truck. Even most of the long 32' stock trailers have a max GVWR of 20-22k lbs. Most big ranches around here that have to haul that many head to the market generally has something bigger than a 1 ton so they can haul more than just 30k at a time. Not cattle, and not the heaviest load in the world but kind of an interesting one: It is a 6500 lb auger hooked to a 15,000 lb tractor sitting on a 7000 lb trailer being pulled by an 8500 lb pick up. About 120' in length .... it actually pulled quite nice and I won't bother saying at what speed. http://i1117.photobucket.com/albums/k585/4x4ord/auger-1.jpg height=400
4x4ord 11/28/16 10:26pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

I still think these 30k+ tow ratings are absurd just to say "best in class". I applaud GM for not getting into this pissing match and keeping their tow rating close to the 22k that most will never go over. All I care is if my Ram can tow the 14-15k I need it to while keeping the speed limit and with power to spare. It has proven more then capable of doing that many times over. I can see getting all hot and bothered about these tests if you actually towed 30k lbs, but if you won't even tow half of that with your rig and the power you have now is more than plenty to pull what you do tow while easily maintaining the speed limit or getting up to speed, then what is the point of what it does with 30k that you will never even come close to towing? We've been towing 30,000 lbs behind 3/4 ton pick ups for decades but it is only the latest generation of pickups that handle this weight with any real style. The Ike test might be more applicable to most of us if they lightened the trailer and climbed a bit faster......39 mph is a little on the slow side for most RVers.
4x4ord 11/28/16 04:38pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

Another interesting thing not mentioned on the F 450 video is that many auto insurers stop at 350/3500's. Getting a 450 might require finding an insurance company like Progressive that will insure it. And, lastly, while a very nice truck, the payload mentioned by the testers was around 4500 pounds. For a 450 dually that is incredibly low, lower than my Ram 3500 dually. The 450 may be built to tow more but not haul more, for example, a cabover camper. Also, interesting is that the 30,000 pound trailer has a gooseneck that is around seventeen percent tongue weight or close to 5000 pounds, plus two occupants. I've owned two F450's, a 2010 and the 2016 in my sig. I insured both with Allstate. I can't explain the ratings Ford puts on the F450 pickups, but I can tell you that both of them have carried my 5500 lb Lance exceptionally well. The only suspension mod I put on them was some StableLoads. I made some for the 2010 myself, and bought the real things for the 2016. Mine were only about half the thickness as the real ones. I wouldn't hesitate to tow up to its maximum rating, and not worry about exceeding the payload. As long as you stayed within the normal percentage of trailer to hitch weight, you would be fine. :):)
4x4ord 11/28/16 04:22pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

It just doesn't make sense. You let up on the accelerator to tell the truck you want it to pull harder??? Obviously if the engine is revving high, letting up on the skinny pedal will encourage it to upshift. I think Mr Truck has been sucking in too much diesel smoke. Watch the F 450 video beginning around six minutes. The discussion is all there. Another interesting thing not mentioned on the F 450 video is that many auto insurers stop at 350/3500's. Getting a 450 might require finding an insurance company like Progressive that will insure it. And, lastly, while a very nice truck, the payload mentioned by the testers was around 4500 pounds. For a 450 dually that is incredibly low, lower than my Ram 3500 dually. The 450 may be built to tow more but not haul more, for example, a cabover camper. Also, interesting is that the 30,000 pound trailer has a gooseneck that is around seventeen percent tongue weight or close to 5000 pounds, plus two occupants. Yup, I heard the statement..."if I let off the gas it would downshift" I'll stick with my interpretation of that statement.
4x4ord 11/28/16 12:06pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

Why is it odd? From your own figures the Nissan made more HP up to about 9,000 ft. By then the Nissan was so far ahead that they beat the oil burner up the hill. It would be informative to learn what Cummins would have to say about the test. By way of information the Ike grade is an almost constant seven percent, perhaps the steepest grade for eight miles of any interstate route. Also, the Ike gauntlet tops out at 11,100 feet and the test begins at around 9000 feet. So, the gasser would be down close to twenty percent of it's sea level power. The Cummins should make almost sea level power at 11,000 feet since it is turbocharged. The Titan Cummins is rated at 310 hp and 555 foot pounds torque, basically all power is available up to the summit/tunnel. The Titan's Endurance gasser is normally aspired and comes with 390 hp and 409 foot pounds torque. At 9000 feet, the start of the test the gasser has lost almost twenty percent of it's sea level power so it would start the test at 312 hp and 327 foot pounds and at 11,000 feet the numbers would be 27.5 percent lower; or 283 hp and 296 foot pounds torque. The seven hp for the additional 1000 pounds should not have made that much of a difference. I noticed that it was mentioned that the Ike is a nearly consistent 7% grade. It's not though. I read somewhere that the elevation gain is 2225 feet (it is no more than that anyway). 2225 gain over 8 miles is only an average grade of about 5%. According to this website the maximum grade is 6%.
4x4ord 11/28/16 09:04am Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

"We need Cummins to comment, but the only reason I can imagine for why the transmission would downshift by letting up on the accelerator on the uphill run is because the truck would have lost some of its speed... " The testers basically said the same thing (letting up to downshift) about the F 450 test when they felt it should shift down climbing and the truck was still in the higher gear, lower RPM's, and slower speeds. It just doesn't make sense. You let up on the accelerator to tell the truck you want it to pull harder??? Obviously if the engine is revving high, letting up on the skinny pedal will encourage it to upshift. I think Mr Truck has been sucking in too much diesel smoke.
4x4ord 11/28/16 08:53am Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

Using the 2.5 % power loss per 1000 feet of elevation above sea level the gasser should have been making peak power of 303 HP at 10,000 feet. The diesel is rated at 310 HP. The power required to lift the extra 1000 lbs up 2225 ft in 10 minutes is 6.7 HP. So I would have guessed the two trucks to have had similar times. But, I would have guessed the six gears in the diesel to give a little better results than 7 gears in the gasser.
4x4ord 11/28/16 12:07am Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

I thought the whole point of the Ike tests was to mash the pedal to the floor and let the trucks do their thing. That is what the testers say about some of the tests. This Ram test the driver said he would not manually shift it going up hill but would let off the throttle to let it shift. It is an impressive truck!! I think Mr. Truck didn't know what he was talking about. We need Cummins to comment, but the only reason I can imagine for why the transmission would downshift by letting up on the accelerator on the uphill run is because the truck would have lost some of its speed... then it might downshift when he mashed it again.
4x4ord 11/27/16 10:00pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

I watched the F450 run up the Ike video again. Mr Truck left the Ford to shift on its own at about 6:30 in the video. The transmission waited till the engine rpm dropped to nearly 2000 rpm and 39 mph before shifting. That is a significant mistake ......at 2000 rpm the engine only makes 350 hp.Mr Truck should have made a manual downshift at 2300 rpm and 45 mph. The engine would have revved to 3000 rpm where it makes 420 hp. The Powerstroke has very significant torque rise from 3000 to 2600 rpm that he could have made use of. It depends how long he ran the engine below 2300 rpm but I suppose that blunder could have cost him 15 seconds. I thought these super duper smart new automatic transmissions knew exactly what gear to be in at all times, even more than the driver. :B. LOL. If the goal is to race up a mountain with your foot to the floor you can reach the top a little quicker by manually selecting the optimum gear at just the right time but when you're casually enjoying your drive it might feel a little more relaxing having your engine loaf along at 2000 - 2300 rpm instead of spinning in the 2600 - 3000 rpm range. I find the Allison behind the Duramaxs I've owned are tuned to be more aggressive with their shift points than the Fords and I don't mind having to manually wake up the lazy Ford on the occasions that I want a little more performance.
4x4ord 11/27/16 09:52pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

Downshifting with the Aisin trans is a waste of time when climbing a grade. I have tried it thinking a higher RPM would net a higher MPH. Downshifting while descending does work well by keeping the RPM in the high 2,000's. Combined 33K in 2nd would hold around 33 MPH as seen in video on this 14 percent grade. http://i.imgur.com/AbM6p3cl.jpghttp://i.imgur.com/e50i9B2l.jpg Wow. Impressive. I haven't seen a torque curve for the new 900 lbft Cummins but you can be certain that at 1900 rpm the engine is making no more than 325 hp. If you downshift at 2100 from 4th to third you will jump to 2800 rpm where your making 385 hp. I'm not sure what the torque value of the cummins is at 2100 rpm but I do know that by downshifting from 4th to third at 2121 rpm brings your engine rpm up to 2800. At 2800rpm the engine makes 722 lb ft of torque. When that torwue is multiplied by the 1.32 third gear ratio your definitely going to gain making the downshift. You're equivalent to 953 lbft of torque in 4th gear which is more torque than the engine can deliver at 1800 rpm and you don't have to slow down to get it. I wouldn't necessarily make the shift but if I knew the hill was going to cause it to happen anyway I would shift sooner rather than wait.
4x4ord 11/27/16 10:27am Tow Vehicles
RE: 30,000 lbs behind the Ram

I'm glad I'm not in the market for a new truck, I don't know which one I'd buy! I've been a Ford and Chevy guy most of my life but that was the old-school stuff that really hasn't got anything to do with the new trucks today. The only reason I have a Dodge is I wanted a Cummins, and that's only because I do my own work and the straight six is so much easier, and I don't like that on the Fords you have to lift the cab off just to change a fuse or empty the ash tray. Pickup diesels are getting to a pretty high stress level. The biggest truck I drive has a Caterpillar C15. It's rated at 550hp, not a whole lot more than the new pickups or my hot-rodded old 5.9 Cummins, but it's a 15.2 liter monster. The one I drive the most has a 10.7 liter Cummins M11 that dynoed 370hp at the wheels. Makes me wonder how these pickups are going to stay together! I'm sure the pickup horsepower numbers are inflated because they are measured at higher RPM but they are awfully strong. When it was new, my GMC 3500 dually with a gas 454 was the strongest pickup available! What's next, hybrid electrics that make 2000 ft/lbs right from a dead stop? Probably!! The big Cat or Cummins engines deliver high hp hour after hour in many applications. A pickup truck pulls hard on the odd hill every once in awhile. Regardless, these little pick up truck engines making 350 HP at 2000 rpm is nothing to sneeze at. In order to move one of these trucks up the hill in 11.5 minutes with a 30,000 lb trailer in tow, the truck needs to put an average of 300 hp to the pavement over the entire run. A test like this demonstrates that the trucks have transmissions and cooling systems in place to utilize the power they are making. It's interesting to note that it takes just as much power to pull a 16000 lb RV up a hill like this at 60 mph as it took for the Ram to pull the 30,000 lb trailer up in the 12.5 minutes.
4x4ord 11/27/16 09:34am Tow Vehicles
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