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 > Your search for posts made by '4x4ord' found 566 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: How many miles have you towed in one day?

I might have the record. One very long day I flew from Calgary AB to Knoxville TN where I picked up a new truck. After purchasing the truck I went out for a very late supper before driving all night to Paris Tx where I installed a B&W hitch in my truck. Immediately after finishing the install, which I did in a Napa parking lot I headed down to Emory to pick up two gooseneck trailers stacked piggy back, one on top the other. From there I drove all the way to Des Moines Iowa. In Des Moines I picked up a third trailer which was stacked on top the two goosenecks and ended up spending a good part of the morning at the Ford dealership having my truck checked out for a noisey turbo. I then headed on to Mitchel SD where I got a room for the night. So the first day was a long one....I got up at 5.00 am to catch my flight and hit the pillow at 11.00 pm with just shy of 2000 miles on the truck......66 hours later. The next day I drove the remaining 1100 miles home....on day two I did a bit of shopping while I had a paintless dent removal place remove numerous dents in my truck after driving through a hail storm. As well on day two I spent hours at the border importing the truck from the US into Canada....I think day two was nearly 40 hours long. My neighbors are a husband and wife tag team that drive from north of Calgary AB all the way down to Miami Florida and back every week. I believe it is 6000 miles in 6 days....they spend a day at home before doing it all over again.
4x4ord 12/16/17 04:24am Towing
RE: F250 CC SB 4x4 6.2-3.73 or 4.30 for 10,700lb travel trailer

All the years I drove my old 6.5 turbo diesel I never used the clutch other than to get moving so it didn't have any trouble out lasting the crummy engine....every 100,000 miles. Back then I enjoyed shifting. Now that the automatics are so good I would have a hard time going back to a hand shaker......I'd also have a hard time going back to a gasser.
4x4ord 12/15/17 06:15pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

4x4ord, I se you are finally understanding WHAT and only WHAT force is turning the drive wheels! Vehicle motion and velocity/up a grade motion etc is controlled solely by the amount of twisting force (torque is what it's called) applied to the drive axle which then turns the wheel against the surface the tire is on and thus moves the vehicle as in distance made good in and with moving the vehicle. No brakes being applied and/or insufficient torque applied on a grade surface results in gravity overcoming the rolling resistance either in a forward or backward direction. Horsepower need not apply as it is merely a theoretical calculation which does absolutely nothing for force turning any vehicle axle or drive wheels. Yes, a horse can pull or push a vehicle with having a type of connecting device etc but that does not forcefully twist the vehicle's axle in the right or left rotation direction as they will be free wheeling when the vehicle is being either pushed or pulled by an exterior force being applied. Why is this so hard to understand??? factual knowns and backed by all data 101... Torque is a measurement of force, so yes the force acting on the rear axle is torque. However force has no time component to its units of measure. Therefore it says nothing about how fast a truck can climb a hill.....energy transferred per time or speed up the hill is power....typically horsepower.
4x4ord 12/15/17 09:44am Tow Vehicles
RE: How much does the F150 EB benefit from premium?

I find this very interesting. I tried a tank of premium in our Acura years ago and didn't measure any improvement in fuel economy so against the manufactures recommendation we used only regular in it.
4x4ord 12/15/17 09:22am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

What about the saying that Torque is what moves you and horsepower is what you feel. Any truth to it ? It is interesting to point out that when you mash the throttle to the floor and your car begins to accelerate you feel that acceleration in the seat of your pants. The transmission will shift and the engine will again continue to rev through its operating range. What you feel in the seat of your pants is acceleration. The acceleration and feeling is the greatest in each gear at the rpm that the engine produces the most torque. So in that light someone could argue that torque is what you feel. In actual fact the more torque you can put to the rear wheels the faster the car will accelerate. But to maintain that high level of torque, as the axle rpm increases, takes more and more horsepower.
4x4ord 12/15/17 07:14am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

Torque without rotational movement is useless just like Coke without Crown is useless. Torque without rotation is not useless. What holds a truck still parked on a hill? How much hp does it take to hold that truck? Brakes and friction. However I was jokingly speaking in terms of moving 12.5k lbs up a hill at 60 mph. If there is no movement and the engine does not have enought torqur to move rotate the crange then it can't reach 60 mph or any speed. Once it does have enough torque to move the crank then it is making horsepowe. Exactly.....so Travelnutz, torque without rpm accomplishes no work. Torque in conjunction with rpm is power.
4x4ord 12/15/17 06:59am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

As a nearly 40 year automotive engineer and automotive engineering operation owner, I sure as hell do know what I'm talking about! Taught many classes and you'd be wise to attend such! Torque and only torque is what and the force that turns the wheels to make the vehicle move at all or to any desired velocity and keeps it at that velocity also. Especially apparent on an uphill grade where torque does it all, all the time. Simple, as if you do NOT have adequate torque to maintain a desired velocity, the vehicle will drop in velocity. Theoretical horsepower turns NO vehicle wheels nor does it apply one ounce of force to turn any wheel as horsepower is only theoretical calculation value. Torque is the only axle/wheel twisting force ever present! NO work is accomplished or done at all if there isn't adequate torque to make the wheels turn to any velocity. Try to deny this known well long time established FACT!!! You've got your units confused. Asking how much torque is required to move a 20,000 lb truck up a 7% grade at 60 mph is like asking how may feet of gasoline it takes to fill your fuel tank. Hp is a number used to tell you how much torque you need to produce at a rpm to achieve that speed. I think you guys are saying the same thing just have a different way of looking at the equation. How fast can you accelerate to 60mph up a 7% grade with 12.5k with 300hp? To answer the question you have to know how much torque you can apply through the RPM range. HP will just tell you the max speed it will achieve. If you don't have the ability to apply the torque needed to get the load to that max speed then max hp is useless. Let's not get talking about acceleration yet. You are correct about a vehicle needing to put a certain amount of torque to the rear axle to move up a hill. So for instance a 20,000 lb truck/trailer combination parked on a 7% grade will have a certain torque on its rear axle. The lbs of force trying to roll the truck down the grade can be calculated by taking the sine of the arc tan of 7% and multiplying it by 20,000 lbs. It turns out to be about 1397 lbs. That 1397 lbs is pulling on the outside of the tire so if the truck has 34" diameter tires the torque arm would be 17" or 1.4167 feet. The torque on the axle is 1397 x 1.4167 or 1979 lbft. So the truck needs to be able to put about 2000 lb ft of torque to the rear axle in order to start climbing the hill. Additional torque is required to overcome wind resistance if the truck is moving faster. So for instance to overcome wind and rolling resistance at a speed of 60 mph a truck/trailer will be consuming about 6 gallons of fuel per hour. (10 mpg) We know that 6 gallons of diesel contains about 327 hp hours of energy. If we assume a pick up truck engine is running at about 30% efficiency while running part throttle pulling a trailer down a level road at 60 mph we can figure that it takes somewhere in the neighborhood of 30% of 327 or 98 HP to overcome rolling and wind resistance of a typical 5th wheel traveling 60 mph. So 98 hp are needed at the rear axle to travel 60 mph on level ground. If the tires are 34" in diameter then they will be turning 593 rpm at 60 mph. So 98 hp at 593 rpm means there will be 98 x 5252/593 or 867 lbft of torque on the axle to overcome wind and rolling resistance at 60 mph. So the torque on the rear axle of the trucks going up the Ike would be in the neighborhood of 2847 lbft if they are to maintain 60 mph on the 7% grade. In order to put 2847 lb ft of torque to the rear axle the Duramax would need to be putting out about 878 lb ft of torque at the crankshaft if the transmission is in 4th gear and assuming a 15% power loss while running with the torque converter locked up. The engine would be running at 2212 rpm and producing 378 crankshaft horsepower. Edit: I should have used something a little higher than 30% for the the engine's efficiency to guestimate the power required to travel 60 mph on level ground. Maybe 38% would have been a better guess. So instead of 98 hp maybe 124 would have been a closer guess. If I add 26 rear wheel hp to the power the Duramax would have to come up with it would be 30 crankshaft HP. So the engine would have to be capable of 408 HP at 2212 rpm......or it would have to drop down to 3rd gear and rev to 3110 rpm (I don't lnow if the Duramax revs that high or not?) Maybe it would slow to 55 and run at 2850 in 3rd?
4x4ord 12/14/17 08:50pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

As a nearly 40 year automotive engineer and automotive engineering operation owner, I sure as hell do know what I'm talking about! Taught many classes and you'd be wise to attend such! Torque and only torque is what and the force that turns the wheels to make the vehicle move at all or to any desired velocity and keeps it at that velocity also. Especially apparent on an uphill grade where torque does it all, all the time. Simple, as if you do NOT have adequate torque to maintain a desired velocity, the vehicle will drop in velocity. Theoretical horsepower turns NO vehicle wheels nor does it apply one ounce of force to turn any wheel as horsepower is only theoretical calculation value. Torque is the only axle/wheel twisting force ever present! NO work is accomplished or done at all if there isn't adequate torque to make the wheels turn to any velocity. Try to deny this known well long time established FACT!!! You've got your units confused. Asking how much torque is required to move a 20,000 lb truck up a 7% grade at 60 mph is like asking how may feet of gasoline it takes to fill your fuel tank.
4x4ord 12/14/17 03:26pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

4x4ord, "Oops. You're right. At 7% grade the trucks would need to be making some power to hold 60.....likely about 300 rear wheel horsepower would be required." Might I remind you that horsepower is only a theoretical calculated value and not a measurable value? The REAL and only actual value/values are how much TORQUE (measured twisting force) at the rear drive wheel/wheels is required to propel the vehicle rig to 60 MPH velocity up a 7% grade! Horsepower is meaningless as it's only a calculated theoretical value by using the only 2 measured and measurable values known! Engineering and Physics 101! Think about it! You have no idea what you're talking about.
4x4ord 12/14/17 08:21am Tow Vehicles
RE: Realilistic mileage with a fifthwheel.

Yep. 8-10 no matter what you are towing. You must do all your towing at 70+, my 01 Ram gets 10 to 12 towing close to 12k. I would not expect much of a change going to a newer Ram. The old 6.5 GM, the early Duramax and those horrible old tractor engines got better mileage. My 2017 Ford seems to be doing better than my 2016 F350 when running empty. I haven't had an adequate opportunity to check it towing yet.......My '16 does about 10 mpg towing
4x4ord 12/13/17 11:42pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Buying a truck from up north??

Up here in Alberta there are certain winters where salt is used quite a bit. My 2016 F350 looks absolutely like new regardless of whether you look at the body, the interior or the underside of the truck. I sold my 5 year old King Ranch to a fellow from North Carolina and he was quite concerned about salt. After having me photograph the underside of the truck from multiple different angles he came up and bought it.....I think he was very impressed when he saw it. We have a 1992 Honda Accord that we have had in the family since new. It is starting to get a little rusty now but I think the only thing that has been replaced on this car are tries, brakes, battery and a muffler.
4x4ord 12/13/17 11:29pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

I have to disagree about the times not being about horsepower available. The road they use for the Ike has constant grade changes from 3% to 7%(check for yourself here road elevation map) and the inconsistency of a human (Mr Truck) foot will cause the truck to constantly loose and gain speed. There is also a very steep part at the very top and flattens out as you come to the lights at the end. Neither truck would not be at a constant 60 mph the whole way up even if you put it in cruise control. According to how much torque each truck makes at certain rpms, I can guesstimate that the Ford has 400 hp at its disposal at 2,500 rpms, the Cummins has around 300 hp available at 2,050 rpms, and the GM has around 275 hp max at 1,600 rpms. The next time you tow a heavy trailer, put your truck in cruise control coming up to a steep hill and you will notice that you will loose some speed as you start up the hill and will have to apply more throttle to get back up to speed. Do this in 6th, 5th, and 4th gear and tell me which gear allows you to recoup that speed quicker. I bet you it will be 4th when you are making the most horsepower. This is why truck drivers will downshift as they are coming to a steeper grade to get their rpms up so they will have enough horsepower to maintain speed. Oops. You're right. At 7% grade the trucks would need to be making some power to hold 60.....likely about 300 rear wheel horsepower would be required.
4x4ord 12/13/17 04:30pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

The times up the hill have absolutely nothing to do with "most horsepower". The trucks were driven at the speed limit. Mr. Truck's right foot determined how long it would take for the truck to make the run. If one of the trucks had a speedometer that read 60 mph when the truck was actually travelling 61 mph and another truck had a speedometer that read 60 mph when the actual speed was 59.5 mph the difference in time up the 8 mile run (if Mr. Truck did a perfect job of holding the truck to an indicated speed of 60 mph) would be 12 seconds. The fuel economy was not accurately measured and is too close to call on the GM vs Ram test. GM should change their design for the tow hooks. I have not driven a GM lately but I am sure it is not too difficult to get the exhaust brake to work. If Mr Truck wanted to tell the truck to hold at 50 mph he should have used the cruise control. If he wanted to control the speed manually he should have controlled it manually.....likely just touching the throttle for less braking and releasing the throttle fully for more braking would have worked wonderfully.
4x4ord 12/13/17 09:38am Tow Vehicles
RE: Looking for snow advice - POSITIVE COMMENTS ONLY

If you have no experience driving in snow I would recommend you not learn with a 40' trailer in tow. Even for someone with experience, towing a trailer on slippery roads can be challenging.
4x4ord 12/12/17 09:49am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Ram Cummins Vs GM Duramax Ike Gauntlet

When the trucks didn't make big power I found these tests interesting. I still didn't buy the winning truck. I no longer even find these tests entertaining......I never watched the video but it is quite obvious from your comments that test was useless. I suppose if they conducted an acurate towing fuel economy test where they started with a clean dpf and ended with a clean dpf it might be interesting. Maybe the towing up a hill is of value to guys towing 28000 lbs but my guess is that the slowest truck on one hill could be the fastest on another. So again the uphill tow test is pretty much useless.
4x4ord 12/12/17 08:24am Tow Vehicles
RE: How Affordable are New Dually’s?

I would purchase a Ram diesel before buying a GM or Ford gasser. However, when I purchased my Ford Platinum diesel I only had to pay $1500 more than the best price I could find on a Ram Laramie Limited and the Ram didn't have as many options as the Ford. I never looked into a GM at all. I would rather have options I don't need than want options I don't have. For that reason if I was on a budget I would buy a used Platinum before buying a new XLT.
4x4ord 12/11/17 10:11pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Fifth-wheel Questions.

Ford rates the axle at 7230 lbs ..... I would guess that is limited by springs. The tires are rated for 3750 each so 7500 lbs. The unladen weight of the truck's rear axle weighs 3475 lbs includes 3/4 tank of fuel, driver and hitch.
4x4ord 12/11/17 08:07am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Fifth-wheel Questions.

My 2017 F350 SRW is rated for a 21000 lb fifth wheel. My 5th wheel measures a little over 36 feet and has a pin weight of 2600 lbs with a total weight (ready to camp) of around 14,800 (15,500 GVWR). To stay within the truck's GVWR I would not be able to tow a 5th wheel with a pin weight over 3000 lbs. A pin weight over 3600 lbs overloads the truck's rear axle weight rating.......3600 is therefore the heaviest pin i would want on my SRW truck.
4x4ord 12/11/17 06:35am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Torque wars continue in the diesels

Based on my past trucks by the time I get 100,000 miles on my Ford it will likely be in next to new condition. I'll still be ready for a new one.
4x4ord 12/10/17 10:15am Tow Vehicles
RE: F250 hitch rings

Why not change the hooks on your safety chains?
4x4ord 12/10/17 09:59am Tow Vehicles
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