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 > Your search for posts made by 'BenK' found 434 matches.

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RE: 4x4 transfer caserepair

Have seen old cast iron T-Cases crack and have seen some of the NP cases crack, but the difference is that some of the NP cases are made from either aluminum or MAGNESIUM I'd not fix any and get a uncracked/busted/etc junk yard case and rebuild it This image is a busted NP T-Case and most likely driven in 4x4 lock on pavement or on good traction surfaces. The below link is to a site that addresses the age old non-4x4 or newbie-4x4 person asking and/or folks providing advice (sure you can) if it is okay to drive on pavement in 4x4 lock...of course a standard 4x4, not all-wheel or full-time...NO IT IS NOT OKAY to drive in 4x4 lock on good traction conditions http://www.baja101.com/4x4abc/4WD101/img/transfer.jpg width=640 Here is why part time 4WD should never be used on dry pavement This image show why... http://www.baja101.com/4x4abc/images/101/4WD_turn.jpeg width=640 I would go reman or low mile used. I've never seen a T-case blown up! How did you do it? Curious!
BenK 04/27/17 03:38pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Cars moving to 48V systems

These new voltages are for the system controls...dash, vehicle network controllers, etc....NOT the drive train stuff The inverter/controller/power-source for the drive train cab be in the 600 volt range
BenK 04/26/17 08:54pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Added second trans cooler silverado 5.3.

Kinda sorta...but... Even old, old, old ATF had specifications for it's manufacture and usage...meaning a temp range it operates at best...again refer to the human temp range example in my post at the beginning of this thread...and note that the humans a decades ago likewise used the same heat rejection management system as modern man does... The key to ATF temp management is that it is normally plumbed to go into and out of the main radiator's cold tank That cooling system does have a thermostat and a temp range it manages the coolant to. The coolant has many input sources of heat...ATF is one of them and the ATF/coolant temp is managed by the main radiator's thermostat Why plumbing the AFT external radiator BEFORE going into the main radiator is important. In extreme cold, it will over cool the ATF below it's operating range and by going into the main radiator...it will be re-heated by the main radiator's coolant in the cold tank In extreme conditions where the ATF gets too hot...the external radiator will cool it and going into the main radiator's cold tank...it will either cool the main radiators's coolant if it is cooler. Guess it can heat it too, but can't see how the various controls would allow that...unless the AFT gets so hot...the external ATF radiator can NOT cool it enough...so it goes into the main radiator hotter than the coolant in there Congrat's on the second career...and in teaching too boot!!!! PS...fav town when traveling a lot was Chapel Hill (bought a few small companies for my company, Sun Micro and had to check on them monthly) and LOVED going to the surrounding eateries of Duke U...am 6 foot and felt tiny compared to those kids out and about there... Thanks for the reminder and me going down memory lane...had forgotten that part of the country My second career is at a community college. I asked one of the automotive instructors about adding the extra cooler to supplement the GM extra cooler. He said it wouldn't hurt a thing. Mine is a 2000 model. The older vehicles do not have the transmission oil thermostats like the newer vehicles. So, he said that for my 2000 it wouldn't hurt at all. The older vehicles do not need the transmission fluid to be at a certain temperature range like the new vehicles. In a new(er) truck it might be an issue because they are designed to run within a temperature range. He said that when towing it's going to get warm/hot anyway and in winter it will still warm up. But, it doesn't have real specific temperatures that it needs to operate like the late models. So, I'm adding the extra cooler to the Suburban.
BenK 04/26/17 07:11pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Cars moving to 48V systems

There are several other lines in the sand of safety rules from the regulatory agencies protecting society from themselves... Like any OEM can NOT use "high voltage" labels for anything under 599 volts...and a big ETC Like HID headlamps require special wiring, color of that wire, protection for that wire....where the high voltage transformer is located and armor enclosure, etc Wonder what the charging and delivery converter (chopper circuit) attains in it's highest voltage? It will be higher than than the DC voltage delivered to the motor...maybe AC motors for this app...as they cost less than DC motors... 96 volts DC would be the better jump...than these micro jumps in higher voltage Everything they say is 'better' is real, but why just to 48 VDC? Because 50 volts is the dividing line between low voltage vs special high voltage safety regulations. Anything over 50 volts requires special safety enhancements both in the engineering/manufacturing and for servicing.
BenK 04/26/17 06:46pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Cars moving to 48V systems

96 volts DC would be the better jump...than these micro jumps in higher voltage Everything they say is 'better' is real, but why just to 48 VDC? Also, no more alternator, no more starter motor (starter engine to you folks who don't understand the difference between a motor and engine). Heck even a two speed tranny and not more TC, valve bodies, etc. Super small too and is where the electric motor goes...where the auto tranny used to be... There was a 1,500 HP traction motor listed in the below link/quote, but find that they took that site down. DARPA funded next gen tank drive system. Fond memories of that phase in my career(s)... Hybrid Trucks for Towing This is the traction motor I'd love to get my hands on...or it's baby brother, if there is one... http://www.electrodynamics.net/projects/high_torque_motor.html 1,500 HP...CONTINUOUS duty cycle next gen tank motor and it will have TWO of them. One on each side (treads) and direct drive on the sprocket. Plus these can be over driven to have over 200% torque at ZERO RPM at a reduced duty cycle (think somewhere around 40%....also assuming dependent on the cooling systems capabilities) On our trucks, NO tranny needed and the diff can be a 1:1 Since no tranny, this motor can be in the tranny tunnel and the ICE bay a pure generator & battery setup....also tried to get a few of the OEMs to understand that architecture, but they have no clue in their marketing and management folks....their engineering folks did and loved talking shop with them...but the decision makers continued to give us headaches... Glad to find you also understand that any 'diesel' locomotive is a hybrid and has been for decades. I'm working on my city's staff trying to get them to understand that and that the freight line can be an all electric for HSR (high speed rail), but that is another topic...
BenK 04/26/17 01:59pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Questions on tow vehicle, considering 8.1 Burb

Keep looking...they are few, but are out there...look mainly for someone who is into fashion statement and doesn't tow heavy or at all...boulevard cruiser type that wanted a big block Technology has come a long ways and will continue...more than just the IP for ICE's that has small blocks produce big block levels of power...even pretty good duty cycles at those levels to boot... But, another component that has made huge MPG strides is the close ratio trannies with DOUBLE OD. That has allowed the ICE's to be tuned to take advantage of closer spaced ratios and that double OD On my list of things for the day decide to rebuild my K3500 Suburban's 7.4L and 4L80E are a 'built' 7.4L, a 'built' 4L80E (up to 1,000 ft/lb rating, but won't be using it at 1K ft/lbs...so going to have a higher duty cycle) and an GearVendor OD (so it will be similar to newer TV's with double OD). Undecided on lower diff ratios....maybe 4.56 or 4.88 or 5.13 and go with the 0.75 to 0.5 gearvendors Plus, they have a gear splitter function that will turn the OEM 4 speed into an 8 speed. Key is that mine develops max torque at about 1,800 RPMs and pretty close to that just off idle...so having a double OD will still have my 7.4L in it's sweet range Here is the 8.1L torque curve, but don't know it will apply to the one you purchase...just a ball park for figuring... More HP & torque than my 7.4L, but very similar shape curves in reference to where it develops torque/hp vs RPM http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v77/bentoy/EngineTranny%20AUTO/8.gif~original width=640 My 7.4L occasionally (not often, but often enough to claim it) gets 15.x MPG. Mostly 12.x when empty on the highway. 10 MPG when loaded with people and towing 6-8 MPG depending what am towing and terrain Does NOT consume engine oil till after 3K or more miles....though it beats up engine oil pretty badly and can tell when it is time to change...when the dash gauge drops in PSI Here is the link to GearVendors and is what am going to get. About $3K, you are buying used, so it WILL still be less than a new TV GearVendors: CHEVROLET/GMC Truck-Car-Van 2-Wheel Drive 4-Speed Automatics GearVendors: CHEVROLET/GMC Truck-Car-Van 4-Wheel Drive 4-Speed Automatics I never understood why GM never offered the duramax as a factory option for the suburban...even if it were to be in small numbers, it would have surely sold. Well, my 8.1 quest is looking gloomy with all the mpg facts. Even though it would be used sparingly...I'm sure we would use it on occasions and the thought of using 80 gallons of fuel to go to the beach is crazy.....lol. The 8.1 isn't ruled out, but a 2500 Ram 5.9, pre 08 is looking better. I have friends who see 20 MPG easy at 60 MPH, not towing.... regularly. What does the Ram 2500 need to be outfitted with for a 10K towing capacity?
BenK 04/23/17 12:38pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Questions on tow vehicle, considering 8.1 Burb

No right or wrong...just opinions... I LOVE big blocks...small blocks are also great...am NOT a diesel person, but know it is great for others... Or that comparing MPG between them is out of context...one has about 12%-15% more BTU's than the other...so of course one gets more MPG...toss in much higher compression ratio than the other...another of course higher output Ten the tons of +/- attributes to them all...I call them Personality traits that you either love or hate about them Again...I'd take a big block any time...heck...even own one...
BenK 04/22/17 01:59pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Added second trans cooler silverado 5.3.

It is all about the laws of physics and what folks 'see' is only a small portion of what is going on...that there are reams of specifications that are based on even more reams of scientific data, both calculated and empirical...then the management factors (idiots only concerned with managing their beans than the product) Take a human body. It has a temp range (specification) for standing still, sleeping, running at curb weight (butt naked) or running with the max spec'd backpack & gear (includes shoes, clothing, etc) The human body has a cooling system and a computer to control that cooling system The computer controls the muscles which create the heat and the rejection stuff. Like increasing the blood vessel diameter close to the exterior covering (AKA skin) to reject it via convection & radiation. The other main cooling mechanism is sweating (phase change) in conjunction with moving more blood to the skin...they both work in concert Too cold and the human body can function, but not up to 100% power Too hot and the human body can function, but not up to 100% power Any automotive vehicle is similar but not with flesh and bone, but with metal and plastic ATF has three main duties. LubricateTransfer heatHydraulic coupling (shear) in the TC Heat is generated with pumping losses, friction and the biggie Hydraulic coupling in the TC Then the endless opinions of whether the OEM stuff is good enough (it is...*IF*...the vehicle is used within the OEM specifications...of which few truly understand...and will toss in 'duty cycle rating' that even less understand)...whether a larger AUX cooler is a good/bad idea, whether to plumb that aux cooler before or after the main radiator, plumb a second external aux cooler in series or parallel, etc, etc, etc...
BenK 04/22/17 01:15pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Added second trans cooler silverado 5.3.

EXCELLENT JOB !!!!! And able to keep the OEM routing back into the main coolant radiator...that keeps the ATF heated in extreme cold areas Also, good job of documenting this nice mod
BenK 04/21/17 09:24pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Oil Bypass Kit Ford 6.0 Super Duty

Will help any ICE last longer and see the need to explain the why of this system Check out this link MachineryLubrication.com Understanding Engine Oil Bypass Filtration Is your engine’s oil filter performing to your expectation? Do you even know the performance of your filter? Most people don’t, and if they did, they would be appalled. Some of the best full-flow engine filters on the market perform at a capture efficiency of 50 percent at a particle size of 10 microns and above. That’s a beta ratio of 2 for those of you keeping score, and these are considered “good” in terms of full-flow engine filtration. In comparison, a beta ratio of 1,000 would be considered “good” in terms of industrial hydraulic filtration. Why is there such a performance difference? The following factors contribute to the variance: Physical Size Often limited by physical size, engine oil filters are relatively small when compared to their industrial counterparts. This small size coincides with less filter media surface area through which to pass the lubricant. Pressure Differential The pressure differential is the change in pressure from the inlet to the outlet side of the filter. If the pressure differential is too high, a valve will open, allowing the oil to bypass the filter. All engine oil filters or heads are equipped with a bypass valve. This valve is needed so the engine does not become starved of oil as the filter clogs with debris. snip....much more at the site
BenK 04/20/17 11:17am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 4 Wheel Drive Question

Push button is not able to switch on the fly much above 3-5 MPH With my older 4x4's, could manually switch gears up to about 20 MPH...gotta know HOW2 'feel' the gears as you double clutched'n rev'ed the engine...
BenK 04/20/17 11:14am Tow Vehicles
RE: How hot is too hot

So similar to questions of which gear to select on an *AUTOMATIC* transmission...it is an AUTOMATIC and let it do it's job...or next vehicle get a manual tranny.. :B Unless you have modified your engine, computer(s) and cooling system, just leave it to the automatic stuff to manage...or if you are over the OEM's ratings (this is one area that does display where you are in reference to the OEM ratings)...or haven't maintained the vehicle well... Depends on what era...even brand of TV Key for performance is when does the computer(s) decide to leave normal power settings and go into 'limp mode' and there are several levels to that ON the performance side, 'power mode' is also dependent on temperatures (not just one, but several spots it senses and sends info back to the computers). One of those sensors will be the knock sensor... First trip with the new Rpod. Towing with 2007 Chevy Colorado. 3.7 LTR 5 cyl. have a scan gauge. It would not show trans temp. It does show coolant temp. The coolant temp stayed around 209,211. As it got hilly, and later in the day, the temp rose to 215. Is this too hot? Doo I need additional cooling? Or a tranny cooler?
BenK 04/20/17 11:09am Towing
RE: F150 5.0 vs Tundra

Aluminum is a wonderful material...when used in the right places...even 'Military Grade'....which is pure marketing verbiage to play to those who are ignorant on that matter. Like anything that is used in the 'Military' can be labeled "Military Grade"...toothpaste/buttons/shoes/plates/paint/etc used in the military can be labeled "Military Grade"... :S Anyone have a set of aluminum sockets?....or aluminum chisels?....how about aluminum lug nuts?....or aluminum grade 8 bolts?....or a wood burning stove with an aluminum fire box?....or an aluminum barrel for a 44 mag? There are perfectly GREAT places to use aluminum, but IMHO, not for a pickup bed used for work...okay as a pure boulevard cruiser pickup that will never see a load of gravel/cobble-stones/bricks/etc PS...what are the GVWR's and GAWR's of these two pickups in discussion?
BenK 04/19/17 12:06pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Maintenance

"Official" OEM RECOMMENDATION... A service writer does not qualify as an official OEM recommendation... Or the recommendations from advisors here on this/these forums....does NOT apply
BenK 04/18/17 07:12pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Maintenance

"Recommended" is also 'required' if you wish to be covered by warranty...and after that warranty runs out if you wish to be covered by liability of design from the OEM One of those 'can' vs 'should' vs 'rated for' language mix-ups...A half ton 'can' and did tow a curb (stripper) Space Shuttle...but is NOT rated for that 160,000 stripper model shuttle. Plus it will not tow it for long before it's wheels fall off...nor can it 'manhandle' that during an emergency situation... Me too...won't fly on any plane serviced by a mechanic that believes in not servicing brake fluid...even though an aeroplane brakes only see a few hundred to maybe a few thousand (private vs commerical) miles in it's lifetime... More than just being a sponge (hyroscopic) for moisture out of the air (via the bleed holes and even those MC reservoirs with bladders...or whenever the cap is opened to check fluid...gets moisture in there) that reduces the fluid boiling point (turns the fluid into steam and a gas pocket that is compressible) to reduce all the way to eliminate braking all together That H2O in the unplated braking lines will have it rust. Both flakes of rust to mess up the seals and the biggie...thinned out the tubing that may burst or leak (loss of braking power) at the worst time...when you try to nail the brakes...
BenK 04/18/17 02:03pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Maintenance

DIY with the 'C' clamp method takes less than an hour for both fronts and also flushes the whole front system all the way to the MC reservoir http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v77/bentoy/Brake/MazdaFordbrakecaliper08jul02.jpg width=640 Mazda B2500, Ford Ranger is the same thing http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v77/bentoy/Brake/05170001_97K1500_HOW2_bleed.jpg width=640 Buddies K1500 Suburban...most all different OEMs are about the same Leave in the old pads, Open the bleeder screw, put on a bleeder screw hose to catch jug, place 'C' clamp to compress the caliper...all the way and the fluid will come out the bleeder screw hose into the catch jug Close the bleeder screw, loosen the 'C' clamp and pump the brake pedal till it is 'firm'. That has the fluid leave the MC reservoir and make sure to have a fresh/new bottle of brake fluid turned upside down into the MC reservoir...do NOT let it go dry... Do that a couple times for each caliper and only have to compress it a 3rd or 4th time, but this time take out the old pads and put in the new pads... Tried several different brands of ceramic pads...do NOT like them. Good old high performance HD much better http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v77/bentoy/Brake/CIMG0092Newceramicpads.jpg width=640 This shows the out-gas slot and anti-squeal backing shim http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v77/bentoy/Brake/CIMG0094NewCeramicpads.jpg~original width=640
BenK 04/16/17 10:29am Tow Vehicles
RE: Suburban 2500 (GMT900) towing build - 11th gen -

PDX...this kind of stuff is fun for me, but to not lose sight of you the OP's plight... Going from a WD 1,000 lb tongue max rating to something like 1,200-1,500 lb isn't going to need major redesign...just enough material (thickness, box section, etc) to distribute that 'extra' weight/loading (force vectors) to a wider portion the frame is NOT rocket science... Suggest you do consult with a ME/PE for peace of mind and documentation for your own liability (never leave that stuff to chance, IMHO) Unless you have the mind to and the shop, it might cost a few more coins than me with three different types of welders, a plasma cutter (modifying it for 1/2" plate...think upping the air PSI will do that and not blow the handle/gun to pieces), cut-off band saw, 80 gallon 2-stage compressor, and two 55 gallon steel barrels filled with scrap metal for this kind of stuff... I'll still noodle this, but DO NOT depend on my comments other than just suggestions, as I have zero skin in your game...just an Internet interest in this kind of stuff HAPPY EASTER !!!!
BenK 04/16/17 10:09am Tow Vehicles
RE: Maintenance

Yup...instantly know trying to dip deeper into their customers pocket with that fuel flush quote... Brake fluid is hydroscpic...meaning it will absorb it out of the air and should be flushed at each pad or shoe charge...or every 2-3 tears. Color is one key indicator...it will darken as it absorbs moisture. I don't recommend ever top up the brake MC reservoir...it is a good indicator of fluid level... If you are into keeping the fluids "fresh"...flush the diff fluid too...and...the most ignored fluid...the power steering fluid... PS...the newer OATs and HOATs MUST be flushed per the manual recommendation...ruination of the system much higher than with American Green coolant
BenK 04/15/17 06:35pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Suburban 2500 (GMT900) towing build - 11th gen -

COOL !!!...just back from the butchers with a BIG leg of lamb (plus lamb shanks) and prepping it with fresh rosemary sprigs n garlic cloves inserted into the middle n tied back together (dad was a master butcher...am only a journeyman cuz dad said there is only room for one master butcher in this family...)...funny you used that leg of lamb comment... :) Yes, find it VERY enjoyable and challenging noodling possible design/modification improvements...miss the design side after moving into management side... Can only guess at the force vectors via these docs...though am impressed you came up with these!!!
BenK 04/15/17 06:27pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Suburban 2500 (GMT900) towing build - 11th gen -

Can only Internet analyze it so much without benefit of spec's and drawings... :( Possible options would be to: Just live with the 1,000 lb WD tongue rating OEM spec be danged and just go with it over the limit (not my kind of metric, just throwing it out there...but you need to decide if you believe in spec's/ratings/limits/etc). This one will break sooner than later Modify an aftermarket and this is what I'd do Still like the Curt a lot, but BigToe is right...these newer designs has every ounce of margin squeezed out...knew that when still working and saw one of our customers using our super computers designing their next gen high end bicycles and at a Ford design center. Management dictates that every penny be squeezed out So, the Curt type of design is for my Sub's generation frame...where it needs less force distribution and can be kept on a smaller foot print The Reese is better for your or these latest frames where the rear portion is really not made for towing heavy. Plus, IMHO, think the designers no longer know enough about towing heavy...just CAD jockey's and we coined them "Red/Green Light designers"...design it...run the simulation and fix whatever vectors the super computer says to...then done... By having a longer end flange, it moves more of the forces forward towards the frame/axle arch On that, since a 6,000 lb GAWR on the rear suspension...the spring perches should be designed for that specification and then some margin Getting some or lots of the tongue forces into that area is the smart thing to do... Key is to NOT weld on the frame and keep welding to a min on the receiver Transition plate on the rear most flange of the receiver to frame web. Ditto transition plate on the forward flange to frame and this one might have more room to box in the frame section...without cutting/welding/etc Good luck...more later...off to buy the Easter Leg of Lamb
BenK 04/15/17 11:06am Tow Vehicles
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