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 > Your search for posts made by 'BenK' found 438 matches.

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RE: rear axle gear ratio

Suburban gasser 7.4L, 4.1's, oversized tires and not corrected in the computer Should be just a hair under 2,000 RPMs cruising at ~65MPH (4L80E OD = 0.75) if corrected in the computer, or the actual speed would be over 70MPH http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v77/bentoy/07020001.jpg width=640 subdash suburbandash mysubdash
BenK 12/06/16 01:10pm Tow Vehicles
RE: rear axle gear ratio

Sign of the times...semantics or the evolution/slang usage in our language... Just like when pointed out the difference between the original usage vs todays usage of 'motor' vs 'engine' Am going to start referring to an ICE's starter as a 'starter engine'...doesn't sound right does it?...well at least to my earballs... :B Lost to too many is that HP is derived from torque...if there is no torque...there can be *NO* horsepower... Or that there can be 1,000,000 ft/lbs of torque, but no HP...yet... :? So, torque is power, HP is power...POWER is torque or HP in today's usage... :S Ben, even these guys are screwed up. Similarly, if the gear ratio is 3.08:1, then the output torque will be 308 lb-ft. It’s easy to see that the lower 4.10:1 gears put more power to the ground than the higher 3.08:1 gears. Keep in mind that the engine’s power has not changed but that the available torque to the tires has. Even the writer of this article is trying to use torque and power interchangeably which you can't do. Then at the last he gets is straight and correct. It's no wonder people are confused. :R
BenK 12/04/16 11:51am Tow Vehicles
RE: rear axle gear ratio

Anyone ever wonder why just making one thing...gear ratio...changes MTWR and GCWR??? Hotrod..How gears work How do gears multiply torque? How does gear ratio affect torque Wikipedia Gear train
BenK 12/03/16 10:08am Tow Vehicles
RE: How did this bearing get bent?

Ops...thank you for that PM... Messed up...the maintenance schedules provided by the OEM in their manuals...are the MAXIMUM recommended time and/or miles between taking care of whatever it is you are looking at You can go shorter time/miles or even longer...that choice is up to the individual and the OEM can or not provide warranty if the owner did not follow their recommendations and went past them... Out of warranty, then do whatever, but I follow those guidelines anyway as I keep my vehicles a long time
BenK 12/02/16 12:35pm Towing
RE: reviews of powerslot rotors for f-250 SD 4x2 2003

It appears we have some brake experts gathered here so I would like to ask about pads. Would a softer pad have better stopping performance? Yes, but only in a narrow lower working temp range Meaning that the softer pad will have higher braking when cold vs performance (harder)...but...when these softer pads get hot (they also have a lower temp working range)...they will NOT have as much stopping power Also, how many times do you expect to brake HARD during a decent down a mountain? Softer pads will heat up beyond their working range and NOT do as well as a higher performance pad This also applies to heavy traffic in the flats...where you use the brakes a lot For the sake of this arguement, we can assume there is no significant wheel slip. What type of pad material would give the shortest stopping distances? Again, you need to define the context of your question If stone cold in the morning, then OEM would... If after a long decent on a mountain/hill/etc...and used the brakes a lot...then the higher working temp range will... Where I am at there are no long mountain grades to worry about. I do realize that a softer material will make more dust, and not last as long. Sounds like OEM are best for you, but remember that if you ever decide to go through a hilly area
BenK 12/02/16 11:12am Tow Vehicles
RE: rear axle gear ratio

Most diff ratios offered are about 10% apart...meaning about 10% more or less power delivered to the drive axles...meaning that going from a 3.73 to 4.1 will have MORE power delivered...or going from a 4.1 to a 3.73 will have LESS power delivered Sure, the new close ratio trannies does have lower first than before, because they can with those extra gears...but going too low numerically on the diff can have higher stresses on the diff gear teeth...'can', not for sure...it depends Since new gear boxes has more gears and are close ratio...they on the other end of 1st gear...has double OD's on most...so if me, I'd go lower (higher numeric) diff ratios
BenK 12/02/16 11:05am Tow Vehicles
RE: How did this bearing get bent?

On OEM warranty/maintenance/etc specifications... They are the BARE MINIMUM's and are RECOMMENDATION's...meaning that you don't have to, but then they don't have to warranty either... As with all things, nothing is an absolute...other than death is...that things like this has ranges for maintenance schedule and materials I use the best can afford/find...not the bare minimum that seemingly most do...but it is a free world...
BenK 12/02/16 11:00am Towing
RE: reviews of powerslot rotors for f-250 SD 4x2 2003

Turtle...hard drives... Cheap and keep filling them from my working HDD's. Use them instead of the old days with 8"...then 5.25"...then 2.5" floopy's then CD's and DVD's Get a gun safe (have a six rifle) instead of an office safe. Both about the same size will have the gun safe in the $200-$400 range....while the office safe of similar size will be over $K Then get a few small safes sized for files. Can stack a few of them next to my rifles in that gun safe Not just from thieves, but fire, which is the bigge Gun safe is good for 2 hours fire and by then the interior gets to ~200*F, but with the small file safe's...it will be days before their interior cooks Main heat routing is via the bolts holding down the gun safe. Even though the good ones will have another insulator for those bolts...it will bring the heat into it during a fire Costco has Seagate's for under $100 and in the 2TB to 4TB range. I like Western Digital better, but they are not on sale often. Get mine from Amazon Make a boot HDD with every new computer and store that in the safe within a safe Then copy info to another 2-4 TB disk and store that in the safe within a safe... As for the thread topic...marketing wins over technology every time on these forums... Kinda sorta agree and dis-agree on the "myth about warped rotors". Generally speaking, it is improper bedding or need to re-bed...but have come across many which were actually warped (dial indicator said so) New myth in the making...modern friction material does NOT out-gas...nope, not correct They do not out-gas as much, but they still do for as long as they have binders (glue to hold the friction material together). Even ceramic...unless pure/solid ceramic racing pads... But full metallic (sintered) has no binders, so no out-gasing of binders
BenK 12/01/16 01:26pm Tow Vehicles
RE: reviews of powerslot rotors for f-250 SD 4x2 2003

Science...AKA "The Laws of Physic's" and "The laws of Thermal Dynamics" in discussion here, so here are some of my thoughts...or IMHO... Braking with automotive brakes using friction brakes is the conversion of Kinetic Energy into heat The heat is generated at the point of friction. That means where the friction material touches the drum/rotor and since most have disc these days...will reference disc brake terminology (though also applies to shoe/drum setups That heat goes someplace(s). Into the air right there, but a very small amount. To the friction material, but friction material is NOT a good conductor of heat...on purpose. Most of that heat goes to the rotor...on a metal rotor. Plastic rotors are designed to absorb that heat better/faster than the pad The rotor must be able to absorb, but there needs to be a temp differential No differential and it will *NOT* absorb and the larger the differential, the faster it will absorb The mass determines how much it can absorb quickly and hold that heat. Then the metrics of rejection of that heat, which has thickness of that path to the rejection spot/area/etc. The material characteristics also come into play here, as is the shape (the why of a 'heat dam' between the rotor and hub on 'some' single piece setups). Thinner or less mass will have less thermal pathways to the rejection area of design An oblique moment #1...the centrifugal inertia must be taken into account at this point by the designers, as the acceleration/deceleration rates must be within design criteria (how fast it will spin up with X amount of torque and stop with Y amount of braking). Dia of the rotor, thickness (weight), etc Part of that is the shape of the centrifugal vanes (straight, curved, how many, etc). That also is factored by the dia of the rotor and the expected dia of the tire vs the expected RPMs of that tire in 'normal' to top end usage There is also a 'crush' component to that design, as when heated to the upper end of design usage specifications...the metal will soften (most are designed to the neighborhood of 1,400*F usage top end) and the platters can be crushed (bent inwards to create a wavy surface) The platter thickness, the vent area thickness and the vanes (number of them, placement of them, etc) along with expected material removal during expected service life must be designed in Part of (just part) the design is the density, porosity (voids), etc of the cast iron (ditto plastic) rotor specification, as are the spec's for the other components of any braking system Oblique #2...the friction material likewise has a crush specification and that is to OEM PSI's expected/spec'd to the mating components Some aftermarket stuff for race or track can crush OEM friction materials...AKA crumble at their high end temps Once the heat is generated...it is absorbed by both the friction material and rotor material. One of the 'whys' caliper pistons is turned backwards (as asked of me by some) and is to limit the amount of surface area touching the pad backing plate...to reduce the thermal pathway back into the caliper That YouTube link is correct, but not an absolute as too many will think...hearing him say that the new binders out-gas "LESS", which means they still do...to produce a high PSI area of gas to float the pad friction material off of the rotor surface...AKA fade (just one aspect of fade) Back on the out-gas relief routs.... Holes were cool and still so much so because of the marketing employed to sell them... Drilled holes will crack. Cast in holes has less stress raisers but they are still there (just less), but EXPENSIVE to cast them in Holes do reduce the mass, so acceleration/deceleration inertia is less...but...since less mass...less thermal capacity...in absorption, moving it around and rejection Slots has less material removed, so has more mass than holes. A good thing in this regard, but less mass never the less Oblique #3...the why of that cut/cast-in slot on most pads today. Even OEM, or the better ones. That is an out-gas slot to allow out-gases from floating the pad off the rotor surface, but that is factored by the surface area in contact with the rotor... Some longer pads has two or more of these out-gas slots cut/molded into the friction material Notice that they are NOT open all the way to the backing plate and that is because once the friction material has worn down there...they need all the surface area then can get in contact with the rotor...but... a losing proposition, as the friction material will have less mass to both hold and transfer that heat...they will over heat easily, but braking is #1 to the designers to meet their design specifications There is much, much more science to this and the above are just some of the high points to get the science across...I hope... :B I've gone back to OEM rotors for my Suburban. The cyro/slotted rotors were cool and EXPENSIVE, but they too heat checked (micro cracks that propagated into clean through cracks)...so why bother...
BenK 11/30/16 03:59pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Newbie needs help with tow vehicle

Valve train and what drives them...comments below IMHO... Gears are best, but they make more noise and tougher to design on OHC Chains are easier to design on OHC, but they have an over shoot so the tensioner has a double duty job. Too much tension and the lube and drag becomes an delicate balancing design act Synthetic belts were to save all of that, but they too have issues. Advertised no to little stretch, lower mass/inertia, lighter, etc, etc... Longevity issues and failure mode is catastrophic on an interference design Turtle...betcha the Porsche 911's of old had a much longer chain...gave up trying to help a buddy trying to save a few pennies...that thing must have been over 10 feet long That was also too small (narrow) and stretched and quickly if the driver nailed it too often Think these new engine designers has the chains just large enough for their middle of the bell curve drivers. Those who nail it often will stretch them...meaning that going from idle (~800 RPM) to over 3,000 in a couple of seconds places tremendous stress on that chain...on these small sports car engines...that some times meant to well over 5,000 RPMs in a couple seconds...
BenK 11/23/16 10:16am Tow Vehicles
RE: US car in top 5 reliability in a long time, it wasn't Ram

Lists like these is like naming EVERYONE who helped you get to the podium...there will be one too many left off...plus the who owns who is in a constant change So, I take these kinds of things with a large grain of salt...and know that they have their own predispositions... As for Tesla...based originally on a Lotus body design...this is the first year that they have made a profit...then the BILLIONs of bucks from the IPO provided the money for his endeavors (SolarCity, SpaceX, etc) and NONE of them are profitable to date CR...PhD's galore...just like the PhD's on my Skunk Works at Labs...perfectly fine PhD's in their field...but also morons that designed un-producible stuff...
BenK 11/17/16 10:34am Tow Vehicles
RE: US car in top 5 reliability in a long time, it wasn't Ram

CR praised a Toyota...then outed that they didn't actually test it...they finally admitted that their 'praising report' was based on their own historical data on Toyota vs any others... Oh well, another filter for me on the value 'to me' on advice based on CR...
BenK 11/16/16 11:59am Tow Vehicles
RE: US car in top 5 reliability in a long time, it wasn't Ram

Ah...Consumer Reports...of course will not even take the info with a grain of salt... CS is okay for kitchen stuff...even their high end stereo stuff isn't good enough for me... Take a look at who fills out their survey's...their own customers and use this as an example all the time (have to, too often)... Was already going to no renew my CS subscription, as all of their recommendations didn't come close to what my preferences were... One year they rated the Matador as their #1 choice and their customers bought in droves...and the next couple years...these same members of their herd rated the Matador as the worst ever... Nope, not my kind of survey...nor results...
BenK 11/16/16 10:31am Tow Vehicles
RE: solution to lug nut covers?

Personally do NOT skimp on this kind of component...not likely to have to buy them again...ever if taken care of... Agree, if the OEM lug nut was torqued that high to break apart the outer covering...the studs are most likely over tightened too... I'd replace them all...again, not likely to have to do that again, ever if taken care of The OP can check them often...if they will NOT hold...they have stretched past the yield point and will NEVER be able to hold...with breakage point very near...
BenK 11/16/16 10:25am Towing
RE: Motor Trend names their"Truck OTY" Anti GM bias there?

This makes you stand out and above the herd...plus am betting you actually read the fine print plastered all over brochures...and another betcha also understand what that fine print does to those ratings... Oh well, you are a rarity...now back to the normal stuff... As always, only all-new or significantly updated vehicles were eligible to participate. Am I the only one who reads further than the title of a story or headline? BTW, for last years test, the Tacoma, the GM midsize twins and full size twins, and the Nissan XD competed. So, Bias against GM must skip a year, since the Chevy Colorado won last year.
BenK 11/15/16 12:45pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing Advice

IT all depends on how you drive, where you drive (terrain, inclines, headwinds, etc, etc) and more etc, etc A bit over the OEM rating won't have the wheels instantly fall off...but....they will fall sooner... Note that the OEMs are required to meet min performance criteria set by the government regulatory agencies. That is at the maximum rating (GVWR, F/R GAWR, GCWR). Meaning things like stopping distance...NOTE that if over the OEM ratings...it will take longer to stop. Not maneuver as well, etc, etc Additional comments embedded below in red I am looking at buying a new TT and want to make sure I am looking at models I can tow safely and easily. I understand I will need a Weight Distributing Hitch. To be honest I've had a hard time getting a clear answer on this from TT dealerships or my vehicle dealership. Every time I enquire I just get the "Oh your fine, you can tow anything" answer. It is their job to sell...and...it is their paycheck for rent/food/etc that is on the line for 'them' You, the OP, need to understand that and read up to learn how the OEM ratings systems works...first decide if you believe in them or not If not, then do whatever but know that you have taken all the OEMs in this food chain off the warranty hook (if any left) and the biggie Liability hook...to own it yourself (maybe your insurance too) This isn't sitting well with me so I thought who better to ask then real RVrs. I know its all about the specs of the tow vehicle so I will do my best to provide this below. 2014 Ram 1500 Big Horn 5.7L Hemi w/ Tow package Crew Cab 6'4" box From The Sicker on the door: GVWR 6800 LB low end of the lowest class pickup/SUV...many are in the +7K lb range GAWR Front 3900 LB Rear 3900 LB Again, on the low side of the lowest class pickup/SUV. Example is the next higher class pickup/SUV will have FGAWR in the +4K range and RGAWR in the +6K range Info- Tire and loading combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed 1070 lbs. (this one confuses me) This is specific to each tire, so check your tire sidewall and that weight rating is at the sidewall listed max PSI From Manual: Towing- 10,000 lb. Payload- 1520 lb. MTWR (max tow weight rating) listed of 10,000 has fine print at the bottom of that manual section...it stated base or curb vehicle with tow option and one 150lb driver. Any other options will have their weight subtract from that MTWR pound for pound Payload is what the TV is rated for as built from the factory If I have left out any relevant info please let me know. I am a little new to this so I may have missed something. Finally, I will be traveling with my wife and two young children. Basically I just want to know what weight of TT I should be looking at. Any help will be much appreciate Thanks
BenK 11/12/16 01:50pm Towing
RE: Electric brakes??

Oh...suspect all advice on these freebie forums...it is worth the price paid... :B Meaning...so many insist that XYZ fixed their problem and is the end all for EVERYONE else...but...that depends on so much...like is their setup EXACTLY like others, etc Why the long thread...covers most areas and note that many of them over lap to mask the true root cause of whatever problem(s) trying to solve. Or use them as the end goal for the setup Suspect my comments too...just learn the general areas of this control system. Know their dials/knobs looking for the root cause of any issues
BenK 11/10/16 09:49am Towing
RE: Electric brakes??

IMHO... :B There is no one best one size fits all, but found & continue to find that most who have helped are not adjusted well...and sometimes not correct First, the trailer brakes are normally not adjusted tight enough and suggest carrying an adjustment spoon no matter which brake controller. From OEM on board, highly integrated to after market. Check them at each stop and re-adjust them as needed. Wiring, first thing is to note that most trailer OEMs only provide a 'just good enough' harness (wire gauge sizing), connectors and run them in series. Parallel (think spider) is best/better. Second, the harness(s) all the way back to the TV's controller needs to be in good order. The TV plug at the receiver some times has an El Cheapo that does NOT home in well and sometimes too much play to cause intermittent connections If after market, the TV brake pedal light switch must be adjusted so that just a tiny amount of foot pressure will turn on that switch. Plunger types (think door bell button) are tough and becomes intermittent if too close My GM OEM brake pedal switch is not adjustable and has one of the smallest switch points have found to date. Takes about 1/64" movement to turn on that switch and way before the MC piston even moves That has the trailer brakes turn on before the TV's turn on (leads the TV). This is has the whole setup act as one while braking The controller has two main adjustments and will only comment on them. The OEM IBC (integrated brake controller) sometimes has several more. Boost and gain. One is the min level pre-set and has to do with how the trailer brakes are sized, setup, work, etc. Think of it as if too low, there is no braking of significance by the trailer Other is the ramp the brake controller will follow once it is turned on Finally, all the above is factored by the sensor that the controller employs Some use the TV MC fluid PSI sensor. Some (most after market) uses an accelerometer to sense the rate of deceleration and will provide more power to the trailer brakes accordingly...ditto MC fluid PSI senses...the more PSI...the more power is sent to the trailer brakes This is why the trailer wiring MUST be top notch, as with poor wiring, all the power in the world sent back there will be lost to high resistance These are the basics, IMHO, and key to setting up the TV/Trailer to brake as 'one'...
BenK 11/10/16 09:38am Towing
RE: Ecoboost vs Hemi

Turtle, knew that but stayed out of the all too common should I use premium or not... Admit that am not as up to speed on DI as could be and will bone up on your link later Also know you know this stuff, so academic for you and discussing for others In order to gain as much PSI on the piston tops, ignition timing has always been before TDC...AKA advanced timing...this also now has DI squirt before that ignition spark, as the fuel has to be in there before the spark This discussion started out, for me, on the intake valve getting fuel to carbon up on the manifold side Overlap is who that fuel gets pushed back into the manifold side of the valve and my point or really a question/comment...why not close it before the fuel squirt?
BenK 11/09/16 07:56am Tow Vehicles
RE: rear axle gear ratio

Thanks for the replies. I'm surprised at the one reply stating less than 1 mpg difference. Can go the other way too, albeit mostly for lower class TV's...as going to a MPG ratio might have the TV then close/at/over the ratings to get WORSE MPG towing heavy Decide if MPG is more important than towing performance/ratings if towing heavy
BenK 11/09/16 07:43am Tow Vehicles
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