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 > Your search for posts made by 'Lantley' found 805 matches.

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RE: Is my TT too big for long trips?

My 2nd thought on projected pivot point vs.actually being on the axle. Is that the fiver is much taller and heavier than a TT. What the fiver may gain by actually sitting on the axle it looses due to being so tall and having a higher center of gravity. On paper maybe someone can determine that the projected pivot point is less effective, but from the driver's seat my experience is the Hensley does tow just as well as a 5'er. There may be exceptions but reality is the 5er center of gravity isn't much higher. The vast majority of the higher up stuff is empty air space. Most of the heavy stuff (tanks, appliances, storage spaces) are concentrated down low. It is a little higher but not near as much as it would appear by looking at the side of the rig. Probably more importantly, trucks rolling over from the higher hitch point of a 5er are almost unheard of compared to trucks jackknifing due to a TT sway getting out of control. A TT properly set up should tow safely & comfortably but even with the right setup an equivalent 5er with no special effort will tow better. I'm still betting, we find the OP is missing something significant...my best guess is he is well over the GVWR for the trailer and the pin weight is low. I agree in general. But it is the air resistance that makes RV trailers, both TT and 5'er more difficult to tow than other trailers, because they have larger frontal areas. A fiver has even more frontal area to contend with.
Lantley 06/20/18 10:28am Travel Trailers
RE: How to find a mechanic in Central MD

Jim Donnies RV service.
Lantley 06/20/18 05:41am Beginning RVing
RE: Max Tow F150s

Why not prove it to yourself. Tow your trailer down a 4 mile 6% grade with your F-150. Than do it with an F-350 SRW diesel? Decide for yourself which one does the better job.There you have it, got to have a F350 "diesel" (gasser won't do it) to tow a trailer My truck has gear selector, rotors, and calipers. They are useful for going down a 6% grade. Honestly a gasser could do it, but I want an exhaust brake too.
Lantley 06/19/18 09:56pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Trading in a Fifth Wheel for a Class A

There are numerous class A's with floor plans that can equal a fiver. We had 4 fivers and will never go back. The ride is way more comfortable and relaxing in DP MH's. I feel way safer driving the MH than I ever did in the pickup fiver Combo, and we had a one ton dually. It can rock a bit going down or up a drive but that's the extent of rocking. There's only so much you can do to get a comfortable ride in a pickup pulling a fiver, and yes it's a big difference in a good DP class A. My maintenance costs are under 1000 per year. Most under 600. But I do have tires and batteries down the line to do. That'll be a spend. We've had ours 5 years. While I can't say they do not exist I have yet to see a Class A with a dedicated bunk room. Not just bunk beds in the hallway or off to the side , but an actual room large enough for the kids to hang out in and close the door!
Lantley 06/19/18 08:24pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Max Tow F150s

You would start with your personal bias of having the largest truck, but that wasn't what I was seeking, nor asking, but instead, you would mislead me on what you want, what you like. You are suppose to begin with answering my questions first, and completely, then offer alternatives, options and suggestions. I don't need to hear how you think that you should have the biggest truck, but I want to hear about my truck towing my trailer. Maury82 wrote: If you are speculating and have no first hand knowledge, say you don't really know for sure, but how you can assume and speculate what you feel or think might happen. Why lie and misguide people who are depending on your word just because they are vulnerable and gullible. Why not prove it to yourself. Tow your trailer down a 4 mile 6% grade with your F-150. Than do it with an F-350 SRW diesel? Decide for yourself which one does the better job. I'm not concerned about which can do it better, but whethere my truck can do it safely. A corvette stops better than most cars, but that doesn't mean other vehicles doesn't stop safely If I came to you for advice on whether my truck can stop my trailer, you should answer that question without bias, and if you are not sure, say that you aren't and are speculating. If I need additional stopping power while trying to keep my truck, there are low cost options in the form of better rotors and brake pads that not only stops better than factors, but are better at dissipating heat. Most people already know about big trucks and their ability to tow what they have, but if everyone just went out and purchased F450 dually diesels, they wouldn't be asking for towing advice up here. There isn't much skill needed in telling people to get a huge 1 ton, just like there isn't much skill needed if a dentist just pull teeth for everyone who walks in his office. Why not put your years of towing experience on display by informing people whether stiffer trailer tires help with trailer sway, whether increasing brake controller gain help with braking, what about increasing brake capacity with better components, or reducing bounce with better shocks...that is dispaying your knowledge. Buying a huge truck is a no brainer, and most people already know that is a default choice. At this point I'm not sure you even know what your saying. Your lack of understanding is apparrent "whether increasing brake controller gain help with braking, what about increasing brake capacity with better components,". Adjustments and components are no substitute for having the right truck:S The right tires should be in place on either platform, the brake controller needs to be set correctly on either platform. This is not about skill, we are not taking on an obstacle course. Or trying to set records. This is about selecting the correct tow vehicle. I am not relying solely on my skill to tow that RV trailer down the 6% grade. I know that with the correct truck I can come down the grade effortlessly. If someone comes to me wishing to tow a 10K GVW trailer on a regular basis without limits and they have a F150 Ego boost budget I'm not going to recommend an EGO boost F-150. I'm going to suggest a SRW diesel 1 ton. Even in its most basic version it will be very capable of doing the job The 1 ton will tow the 10K trailer with ease and without limits.It will also give the buyer capacity for the future. Tires, brake controllers,hitches, shocks and any gizmo you care to name are an entirely different subject. I'm not trying to reinvent the wheel or develop some new technique for towing. I'm simply pointing out the correct tool for the job. You can break up concrete will a maul. You can use a large Macho drill. You can step up to an electric jack hammer and finally you can get a compressor driven air powered jack hammer. All of these are viable methods,however you won't learn which tool to use from a brochure or by contacting the marketing department. However when you actually have experience with the tools you begin to understand their purpose. Choosing the right to becomes a simple decision. Choosing the right tool for the job is the key to success. Knowing the right tool based on experience is invaluable. Once you have found success with the right tool, you will not even attempt the job with the wrong tool....The End.
Lantley 06/19/18 06:42pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Is my TT too big for long trips?

Snip... At the end of the day the FW is still a lot heavier on the pin and the hitch point is over the axle versus 4' back, and no TT hitch is going to change those facts. Snip... I will agree that the FW is a lot heavier on the pin but will dispute your statement that no hitch is going to change the fact that the hitch point is 4' behind the trucks axle. The Hensley hitch DOES change the results of that fact! Due to its' geometry, the pivot point of the hitch is projected to just a few inches behind the axle or in front of it. This fact allows the travel trailer to tow just about like a FW because the attachment point of the trailer is now felt by the truck right about at the trucks axle and cannot influence the direction of travel. The hitch also restores the lost weight from the front axle via the spring bars and jacks so the steering of the truck is like normal. I have towed both 5th wheel trailers and regular trailers for many years and have used a Hensley for the past 10 or 15 years or so. I can testify that the Hensley hitch DOES make a trailer tow as well as or even possibly better than a 5th wheel. I say better because the TT is lower and has less leverage above the CG of the truck than a 5th wheel. It just feels more steady and stable. Barney I don't doubt they work well based on the reports I've read, but I think an actual pivot point over the rear axle is better than a "projected" pivot point, especially if things start to get jacked up in an emergency situation. I towed an 11K GVW TT similar to Dodge Guys prior to getting a fiver. My first thought is that the Hensley tows just as well as a fiver. My 2nd thought on projected pivot point vs.actually being on the axle. Is that the fiver is much taller and heavier than a TT. What the fiver may gain by actually sitting on the axle it looses due to being so tall and having a higher center of gravity. On paper maybe someone can determine that the projected pivot point is less effective, but from the driver's seat my experience is the Hensley does tow just as well as a 5'er.
Lantley 06/19/18 05:29pm Travel Trailers
RE: Is my TT too big for long trips?

My first thought is weigh your trailer so you can accurately determine what your tongue weight should be. Once you have the correct TW you can set your hitch up properly. Your trailer is not too long. Your rig can deliver a relaxing tow. You have plenty of truck,but your trailer / WDH is not balanced. One of the cons of TT's is that the WDH needs to be set up properly and the weights dialed in. A fiver has other cons but in general they tow well right out of the box.
Lantley 06/19/18 10:01am Travel Trailers
RE: Max Tow F150s

You would start with your personal bias of having the largest truck, but that wasn't what I was seeking, nor asking, but instead, you would mislead me on what you want, what you like. You are suppose to begin with answering my questions first, and completely, then offer alternatives, options and suggestions. I don't need to hear how you think that you should have the biggest truck, but I want to hear about my truck towing my trailer. Maury82 wrote: If you are speculating and have no first hand knowledge, say you don't really know for sure, but how you can assume and speculate what you feel or think might happen. Why lie and misguide people who are depending on your word just because they are vulnerable and gullible. Why not prove it to yourself. Tow your trailer down a 4 mile 6% grade with your F-150. Than do it with an F-350 SRW diesel? Decide for yourself which one does the better job.
Lantley 06/19/18 09:45am Tow Vehicles
RE: Max Tow F150s

Maury82 wrote: Remember, you are trying to get people to spend their hard earned money on one vehicle versus another, and not just talking about what you like about your truck. A 10,500lbs trailer is pushing it on a few ratings with a 1/2 ton, and I wouldn't want to be towing regularly with even a HDPP 1/2 ton. You are up here contending that the HDPP trucks aren't meant to tow within its ratings on a regular basis, and it will not hold up mechanically if towing within capacity, but it is OK towing heavy only on occasion, and you are trying to influence people to spend their money based on what you are merely speculating. Remember, you haven't towed anything with a modern HDPP 1/2 ton. Remember, your words are contradicting both Ford engineering claims of the HDPP trucks specifically designed features for both heavier payloads and additional towing features. And you are contradicting what actual owners are saying. Nothing is wrong with you having your opinion, but I would be foolish to spend my money based on your speculations without first hand knowledge, versus driver of HDPP truck who are actually towing, and particularly when your comments are tainted heavily with bias. Your heavily tainted bias against the 1/2 ton trucks carries less weight than the specs in a brochure, and definitely not over the words and actual experiences of the guys who are actually towing heavy TT with theirs. You need to ask them about the HDPP trucks, and learn from them, because you can't offer any information regarding the trucks...I'm just seeing a lot of smoke...lol. Actually I'm not trying to get people to spend their money. That is there decision. I am not a salesman. My advice is worth exactly what you paid for it! I am giving insight into what makes a good tow vehicle and why. I am not concerned with fuel efficiency,soft ride,interior gadgetry,cameras bluetooth etc. My comments are based strictly on towing characteristics. An exhaust brake which is a towing feature, is way more important to me than, any feature mentioned above. There is nothing 1/2 ton drivers can tell me that will lead me to believe they will outperform a bigger heavier truck with an exhaust brake. Experience allows me to see through the marketing hype and brochures because I have come down that mountain with an without the exhaust brake. Down shifting trannies are nice but they are not a substitute for an exhaust brake. My bias on 1/2 tons is strictly related to their ability to tow heavy RV trailers. I'm not saying 1/2 tons can't do it at all if properly equipped. But I am saying if your plans are to tow a large heavy TT without limitations based on: distance,terrain or cargo capacity. There are more capable, competitively priced vehicles available that will deliver a better towing experience. If you are after a relaxing tow experience in all conditions, skip the 1/2 tons. While greatly improved, they still are not equipped to tow a heavy trailer as well as a larger truck.....My bias/thoughts are based on my experiences YMMV!
Lantley 06/19/18 07:02am Tow Vehicles
RE: Max Tow F150s

It is simple. A 250 will generally have much better durability ratings than a 150...Really? I don't believe you. I think you're continuing to blow smoke (BS). Show me the durability rating for each. I think one of the duty cycle issues already mentioned was Ford has no plans to put the Ego boost into the Super Duties because there are duty cycle concerns.. If you are towing within the ratings of your F-150 occasionally, I don't think there will be any duty cycle issues. If you tow with your F-150 at your max. payload daily, duty cylce issues may occur. I don't think duty cycle is a major factor to be concerned with, but it is a real phenomenon I can smoke a whole Buffalo with all that smoke you are blowing...lol I can't believe you are pushing that on vulnerable and clueless newbies under the name of an experienced member. Towing within the F-150 capacity on occasion is ok?...lol Just for laughs, how would towing near the max ratings of the 3/4 and 1 ton affect duty cycles? And for an additional laughter, how can you explain the reliability of the Tundra and Tacoma?... they are reliable because the owners don't tow much? Really depends on what your towing and where you are towing. There are plenty of 1/2 ton owners that have tried there 1/2 tons and eventually upgraded to 3/4 and 1 ton trucks. By the same token there are one ton guys that have upgraded to duallys. The torque provided by the ego boost is a wonderful thing, but at some point there is no substitute for mass. If you look back in this thread some guys said they chose the ego boost package because 85% of their miles are non towing. For them I imagine the F-150 to be viable. Now had they said 85% of the miles were towing than a 3/4 or 1 ton would be a better choice. Your bringing up the reliability of a Tacoma as a tow vehicle:h A tacoma is a decent vehicle, but it's not much of a tow vehicle. Tundra's are decent within their ratings but generally they are payload deficient when it comes to towing RV trailers. Ford took the bull by the horns with their max tow, max payload package and built a 1/2 ton truck with real capability, which is why this thread exist. Tundra and the other 1/2 tons are sitting on the sideline wondering how to compete with the payload of the EGO boost Ford. This is an RV towing forum. The best advice I can give is to buy your last truck first. Don't play the upgrade game. Once upon a time I towed a 11K GVW TT with a Ford Excursion. When it came time to upgrade I went straight for the dually. Not necessarily because I needed it then. But because I knew I would need it in the future. For me the 1/2 ton truck is a temporary measure. I think anyone towing a 8K loaded or greater trailer would be better served with a 3/4 ton truck or larger. Simply because the larger truck allows one room to grow when it comes time to upgrade you won't need both a new truck and trailer. The ironic thing in all this is it's not about money. The difference in $$$ between a new 1/2 ton ego boost max payload, max tow and a late model dually diesel is not that great. It's more about seeing the whole picture and gazing into the future a bit. vs. locking in and focusing on one truck and one trailer. That is likely to change before you know it. I know everyone is content with the rig they have and there is no need to worry or look to the future. All 5th wheel owners said that at one time. For those truly bit with the RV bug upgrading is inevitable. I'd be curious to know how many bought a 5'er as there 1st towable RV vs. upgrading? If you are an OCCASIONAL tow'er that tows on generally flat ground to the beach or the local state park 6-7 times a year a 1/2 ton is fine and will meet your needs. If you want to tow without limits, beaches, mountains, local parks, long distance destination parks and everything in between.The sooner you get a 1 ton truck the better off you'll be. Are you serious to think that there aren't RVers who don't want a huge truck?THe issue is the RV'er wants a large trailer but doesn't want the large truck to go with ity. Your perspectives are very one dementional, and no, I would not be happy with a 1 ton dually diesel Limited. What would I do with that thing when the truck I have should fit the bill. My comments are based on experience. A larger truck will fit the bill for a larger trailer.vs. a smaller truck should fit the bill A One Ton is like using a commercial grade zero radius mower to mow the front yard of your small townhouse. It will do it, but you don't need it...too cumbersome. The F150 HDPP is a unique tow vehicle thatfor some owners, has both unique combination of towing capabilities to meet our towing needs, and for me, an occasional road trip vehicle. This F150 is a big compromise to drive, and once I break this thing in, it stays park with the trailer. I can't see myself driving that ungainly thing unless I really need it for towing or for some unique reason. I'm struggling trying put 1,000 miles on it, and I can't wait to finish up so I can get back to driving my car. A 1 ton is a great tow vehicle, but that's it, and outside of towing, it would be useless, and just a hindrance to drive, and it gets parked with the RV. Tell us how you tore up your newer HDPP F150 towing more than "occasionally". If you can't tell us how your F150 HDPP held up, you are still blowing smoke up our behind again. Correct but I can tell you how my 3/4 ton truck held up. I can tell you how an exhaust brake performs when descending a large hill towing a 10,5000# loaded trailer. The Ego boost has the engine to do the job unfortunately experience not brochures has taught me there is more to it than just the engine. Only people who are towing with newer F150 HDPP can speak about how it tows, how it held up, it's duty cycle, reliability, etc...everyone else is blowing smoke. Experienced smoke.Tow 10K down a 6% with and without an exhaust brake and let me know which you prefer. Just because a person is a newbie up here, that doesn't mean they were born when we joined. Just because I don't own a F-150 doesn't mean I don't understand how it tows
Lantley 06/19/18 04:46am Tow Vehicles
RE: Trading in a Fifth Wheel for a Class A

There's acouple things not mentioned that need to be . Like wife making pop corn in microwave going down the road. Getting you sandwitch etc .. roof air on going down the road Your up higher in the seat you can see better. Leveling is a push of a button . 5 th wheel to class A is abig difference. Far as ride it should be better in class a if it's not there's issues. Springs, over weight, air bags leaking etc . Only thing that's different is the wind catch's motorhome more . But with good alignment tires and good shocks is key. Having generator on tap is pretty nice . Longer the wheelbase the better ride going down the road . My 2 cents . Itasca55 If your needing kid room in classA look at a Monaco they full side slide outs . It's not as simple as just more space. Do class A's have bunk rooms not just beds dedicated for kids?
Lantley 06/19/18 04:32am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Max Tow F150s

First thing to know is what Ford means by Max Tow. It does NOT, repeat, NOT give the truck it's maximum towing capability, but in fact reduces payload. The Max Tow is actually a package with the maximum amount of tow equipment in one package. HD hitch, which on most trucks exceeds the payload, upgraded sway bars, springs, ITBC and 36 gallon tank. When ordering an HDPP with the 3.5 the Max Tow is required, and why it is listed. HDPP is available up to a lariat 500a and limits the options available, otherwise it would put the truck in the 3/4 ton range, which it clearly is not. When reading the tow guide, read the fine print. It specifically points out the actual trim and equipment required to obtain maximum towing, and that is an XL minimum options, screw, 3.5 EB with Max tow. I think it may even be a RWD truck. Max Payload is an HDPP with the 5.0, also in the low trim line. No matter how you look at it, payload is your limiting factor for what to tow. While an F250 Diesel has a lower payload than an HDPP F150, as others pointed out, it has more mass, and more longevity for towing. If you are going to tow to the limits of an HDPP, which BTW is designed for loads in bed and not loads on the ball, which makes it ideal for a light 5th wheel, you will be better off with an F250 rather than an F150 as it will be a more stable platform, and better suited for hard work. If you are buying the truck for RV towing I recommend a F350 vs. an F250 simply for the additional payload. THe price difference between the trucks is negligible.
Lantley 06/18/18 08:00pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Max Tow F150s

It is simple. A 250 will generally have much better durability ratings than a 150...Really? I don't believe you. I think you're continuing to blow smoke (BS). Show me the durability rating for each. I think one of the duty cycle issues already mentioned was Ford has no plans to put the Ego boost into the Super Duties because there are duty cycle concerns.. If you are towing within the ratings of your F-150 occasionally, I don't think there will be any duty cycle issues. If you tow with your F-150 at your max. payload daily, duty cylce issues may occur. I don't think duty cycle is a major factor to be concerned with, but it is a real phenomenon I can smoke a whole Buffalo with all that smoke you are blowing...lol I can't believe you are pushing that on vulnerable and clueless newbies under the name of an experienced member. Towing within the F-150 capacity on occasion is ok?...lol Just for laughs, how would towing near the max ratings of the 3/4 and 1 ton affect duty cycles? And for an additional laughter, how can you explain the reliability of the Tundra and Tacoma?... they are reliable because the owners don't tow much? Really depends on what your towing and where you are towing. There are plenty of 1/2 ton owners that have tried there 1/2 tons and eventually upgraded to 3/4 and 1 ton trucks. By the same token there are one ton guys that have upgraded to duallys. The torque provided by the ego boost is a wonderful thing, but at some point there is no substitute for mass. If you look back in this thread some guys said they chose the ego boost package because 85% of their miles are non towing. For them I imagine the F-150 to be viable. Now had they said 85% of the miles were towing than a 3/4 or 1 ton would be a better choice. Your bringing up the reliability of a Tacoma as a tow vehicle:h A tacoma is a decent vehicle, but it's not much of a tow vehicle. Tundra's are decent within their ratings but generally they are payload deficient when it comes to towing RV trailers. Ford took the bull by the horns with their max tow, max payload package and built a 1/2 ton truck with real capability, which is why this thread exist. Tundra and the other 1/2 tons are sitting on the sideline wondering how to compete with the payload of the EGO boost Ford. This is an RV towing forum. The best advice I can give is to buy your last truck first. Don't play the upgrade game. Once upon a time I towed a 11K GVW TT with a Ford Excursion. When it came time to upgrade I went straight for the dually. Not necessarily because I needed it then. But because I knew I would need it in the future. For me the 1/2 ton truck is a temporary measure. I think anyone towing a 8K loaded or greater trailer would be better served with a 3/4 ton truck or larger. Simply because the larger truck allows one room to grow when it comes time to upgrade you won't need both a new truck and trailer. The ironic thing in all this is it's not about money. The difference in $$$ between a new 1/2 ton ego boost max payload, max tow and a late model dually diesel is not that great. It's more about seeing the whole picture and gazing into the future a bit. vs. locking in and focusing on one truck and one trailer. That is likely to change before you know it. I know everyone is content with the rig they have and there is no need to worry or look to the future. All 5th wheel owners said that at one time. For those truly bit with the RV bug upgrading is inevitable. I'd be curious to know how many bought a 5'er as there 1st towable RV vs. upgrading? If you are an OCCASIONAL tow'er that tows on generally flat ground to the beach or the local state park 6-7 times a year a 1/2 ton is fine and will meet your needs. If you want to tow without limits, beaches, mountains, local parks, long distance destination parks and everything in between.The sooner you get a 1 ton truck the better off you'll be.
Lantley 06/18/18 06:27pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Trading in a Fifth Wheel for a Class A

Reading through some of the responses, a factor could be if you're going from a Fifth Wheel to a Class A GASSER or DP. Another factor is the OP has kids. Some of the responders were just couples. In general Class A floor plans are less kid friendly
Lantley 06/18/18 03:24pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Max Tow F150s

It is simple. A 250 will generally have much better durability ratings than a 150...Really? I don't believe you. I think you're continuing to blow smoke (BS). Show me the durability rating for each. I think one of the duty cycle issues already mentioned was Ford has no plans to put the Ego boost into the Super Duties because there are duty cycle concerns.. If you are towing within the ratings of your F-150 occasionally, I don't think there will be any duty cycle issues. If you tow with your F-150 at your max. payload daily, duty cylce issues may occur. I don't think duty cycle is a major factor to be concerned with, but it is a real phenomenon
Lantley 06/18/18 03:06pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Hensley/Propride owners -- Leaving trailer for maintenance?

I had a ball coupler welded to a stinger. I also become proficient in removing the Hensley entirely. Either way it was not a big deal
Lantley 06/18/18 05:10am Travel Trailers
RE: Advice on floor plan

I have a rear bunkhouse now and honestly I like the floorplan,however if I were buying today I imagine I would have a mid bunk model which would allow for a rear lounge area. My current rig is 39'.In order to have the interior space to give us all some room I think I would still be in the 40'range. Front living rooms are really not the solution because the kids will commandeer the living room as their space leaving the adults with no lounge area. A mid bunk or even a rear bunkhouse gives the kids a dedicated space to call their own. Which in turns leaves the living room for the adults to call their own when necessary. My kids are older and my bunkhouse days are winding down. A rear lounge floorplan is in my future once the kids are gone. But if there are kids in the picture I prefer a bunkhouse rear or mid.
Lantley 06/17/18 08:04pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Mass to Virginia Beach or Outer Banks

If you can drive in Boston traffic the CBBT will be a piece of cake
Lantley 06/17/18 04:51pm Roads and Routes
RE: Max Tow F150s

Maury82 wrote: The 2/3 trucks are designed to tow heavier loads than the 1/2 ton, and it weighs more. Because of of that, they have the suspension rated to handle it's added weight and towing capacity. The F150 EB 3.5 HDPP, has less towing ratings than the same version of the 3/4 ton, and even with a less stout suspension, stops, accelerates, handles turns better than the heavier trucks, because it doesn't need as heavy suspension because of its lighter weight and towing ratings. There are compromises, and while that 3/4 ton will be a bit more stout towing my trailer than the HDPP F150, especially in windy conditions, but that F150 will be stable...a trade-off. I'm willing to trade-off that slight gain in stability for better engine and transmission combination that those gas 3/4 trucks are far inferior to the 3.5 EB when towing heavier loads, particularly up hills and when accelerating. That 3.5 EB add further gains when not towing that the 3/4 ton gas or diesel engines that renders 3/4 ton trucks far inferior to many 1/2 owners...give a little, but gain a lot. Give a little less towing stability, but gaining much more in every when towing and especially when not towing. I think this all boils down to what Huntingdog said a few post Back. THis is a tow vehicle forum. Most of our comments and knowledge is based on what a truck requires to be a good TV. However many are basing there tow vehicle decision on non towing factors. Does it fit in the garage? Is it too tall, Is the ride smooth enough for my wife? Does it have a 10 speed transmission? None of those factors enhances the trucks ability to tow yet many base there tow vehicle decision on those factors. On a tow vehicle forum you are only going to get feedback on what it takes to tow. True towing fanatics know the characteristics of a good tow vehicle however they are not interested or knowledgable in the non towing qualities. The real compromise begin with your mindset. One must decide how dedicated they are to having a tow vehicle vs. a multi purpose vehicle from the start. As one get deeper into towing they realize that all the non towing factors become secondary. Having the right vehicle while towing is more important that having the right vehicle while running errands. It only takes one bad towing experience for one to understand that having a stout truck trumps all other factors. The wrong vehicle while running errands maybe hard to park, however the wrong vehicle while towing may put you in harms way. If/when this happens your mindset changes in a hurry.
Lantley 06/17/18 08:09am Tow Vehicles
RE: No water hookup at Arizona state park

This is certainly not a desert only thing. Lots of state, county and federal parks have electric only sites. Electric only sites are quite common. I am surprise the OP has not encountered electric only sites before. Electric only sites are quite common in the east simply because electric does not freeze. Give me a place to plug in and a dump station I can last indefinitely.
Lantley 06/15/18 07:53pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
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