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 > Where/How Do I Weigh?

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fdj7348

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Posted: 03/21/02 06:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We are about to take a long trip in our 2000 Winnebago Brave 35C. Although I am sure we haven't exceeded the CCC, I want to be sure that we haven't gone beyond the weight limits of each wheel. Where do I go? How should it be done?

oRV

Rainbow's End, Livingston, TX

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Posted: 03/21/02 07:13am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

FDJ: Moving companies, grain elevators and truck stops are among those who have public scales available. You will require an axle scale where you can pull just one set of wheels on the platform at a time. The area to the sides of the platform will need to be relatively level. You will need to know the gross vehicle weight of your Mh as well as each of the axle weights. Pull onto the scale with your front wheels. Lets say that your axle capacity is 10,000 lb. The weight at the scales is 8,500 lb. You have a possible 1,500 lb CCC on that axle. Now, pull off the platform and then weigh each corner to determine proper distribution. Do this again for the rear axle and you should have your figures. Remember. . . weigh the vehicle "wet", that is full of fuel, H2O, family and supplies. oRV


Orvil Hazelton

oRV

Rainbow's End, Livingston, TX

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Posted: 03/21/02 08:33am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ed: I appologize for not having been clear in my post - it was for the sake of brevity. "Now, pull off the platform and then weigh each corner to determine the proper distribution" was meant to cover what you too were trying to illustrate. oRV

Les Curren

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Posted: 03/21/02 08:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sorry, Ed, but your explaination makes no sense. Orvil's is correct. How do you weigh 3 wheels and keep only one off of the scale? Oh,hell,now i get it.It's just another one of your joking around posts. Huh?. You had to know that would come back to bite you in the ass sooner or later. And you have a nice day.

Ipanema

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Posted: 03/21/02 07:45am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Orvil, you neglected to advise of also checking each tire load by adding one more step to your advice. Keep one wheel off the platform and then by subtracting the total axle weight, you have the other wheel's weight. This will help in assuring that you are not overloading your tires and insure best weight overall distribution.


Ed and Lilian




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GLSmith

Yucaipa CA USA

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Posted: 03/21/02 08:10am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While traveling through Oregon last year, I found that it's state truck scales are active and open 24-7, even when unmanned. It's simple, accurate, and convenient to drive across them and weigh your rig. There is generally sufficient space to do single axle and even single wheel weighings. Maybe other states do the same.

wolfe10

Texas

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Posted: 03/21/02 08:42am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Once you have the accurate wheel weights (make sure you are loaded in your normal "going down the road mode"-- if you fill up fuel when you get down to 1/2 a tank, weight with 3/4 tank, same with water, people, gear, etc.) you can accurately determine the correct tire pressure.

For each axle use the heavier wheel position.

Using that weight, go to the tire chart avaliable from the tire manufacturer and determine the correct pressure for that weight. ALL TIRES ON AN AXLE SHOULD BE INFLATED TO THE SAME PRESSURE.

Note, as springs sag with age, weights change-- weigh every year or so if possible. THIS IS MUCH MORE CRITICAL FOR THOSE WITH AIR SUSPENSIONS WITH 3 AIR CONTROLLERS FOR THE AIR BAGS, AS A SMALL RIDE HEIGHT DIFFERENCE (LEFT TO RIGHT) ON THE AXLE WITH ONE CONTROLLER WILL FORCE ONE WHEEL ON THE OTHER AXLE TO BE SERIOUSLY OVERLOADED AS IT ATTEMPTS TO "PICK UP" THE WHOLE "LOW" SIDE OF THE COACH.


Brett Wolfe
1997 Safari Sahara 3540
EX: 1993 Foretravel 36' U-240


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Ipanema

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Posted: 03/21/02 08:35am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Les:
Rethink what you said to my comment. I WAS serious this time. After you weigh a given axle, you reposition your coach so only one wheel (or set of wheels)is on the scales. If I was unclear, I'm sorry as I didn't mean to imply you could weigh individual tire loads on a dual tire axle.
BTW....I agreed with Orvil and didn't say he was wrong but instead, added another step which is recommended to take.
Thanks for pointing this out.

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