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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Tire pressure

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Lonnie

Breese, Il 62230

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Joined: 10/15/2001

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Posted: 03/24/02 10:07am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The tires on my MH say 70 lbs the owners manual said to run 65. Which is correct? I have been running 65 but only had the MH for one trip. Got it last fall. I am pulling a trailier with a motorcycle on it.


Lonnie & Mary
7 RV.NET Rally's
2010 Keystone Springdale 276RBSSR

Chuck S.

Tonasket, Wa. 98855

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Posted: 03/24/02 10:15am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lonnie. The imprint on the tire casing is the MAX. cold pressure. You shoulg weigh the rig and air up based on the owners manual or better yet, the tire mfgs. manual. Tire companys put out spec. sheets and they should be your bible. Never use the max. unless your loading calls for it. Luck, Chuck.....

wolfe10

Texas

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Posted: 03/24/02 05:48pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Zane,

I and more importantly, the tire manufacturers disagree with you UNLESS the tires are at their maximum load.

The worse tire pressure is not to check them at all.
Better is what is printed on the tire itself--as stated above it could only be right if the tire is carrying its maximum load (remember the label says max load AT --PSI.)

Better is what is stated on the RV manufacturer's GWVR sticker. It will show GAWR (A for axle) and a correct tire pressure which corresponds to the axle CARRYING THE MAXIMUM LOAD FOR WHICH IT WAS DESIGNED.

Better is to weight all axles, then using the axle weights to go to the tire manufacturers chart/online/call to determine their recommended pressure for that weight.

BEST IS TO WEIGH ALL WHEEL POSITIONS. USE THE HEAVIER WHEEL POSITION ON EACH AXLE TO GO TO THE CHARTS TO DETERMINE THE CORRECT PRESSURE FOR ALL TIRES ON THAT AXLE (all tires on an axle to have the same pressure).

THIS IS ONE AREA THAT IS SAFETY CRITICAL. PLEASE, PLEASE OPINIONS ARE NOT VALUABLE HERE. IF IN DOUBT, CALL THE TIRE MANUFACTURER'S RV HOTLINE. MICHELIN'S IS 800-642-4354.


Brett Wolfe
1997 Safari Sahara 3540
EX: 1993 Foretravel 36' U-240


FMCA Forum: www.community.fmca.com/index

Diesel RV Club:http://www.dieselrvclub.org/

zane

russellville, arkansas - usa

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Posted: 03/24/02 04:29pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

always go with what the tire side wall has printed on it, they make it they know what is best for it.

Take Care

Zane Western arkansas

bigdaddy & littlemama

Carthage, TN

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Posted: 03/24/02 04:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Go to the tire mfg. web site. It gives you all the correct info on tire pressure and loading. Their site is no bull and will lead you to a safe ride. I run my tire pressure at mfg. spec's for the load. It only costs a few $ to have your MH weighed and $ well spent.


bigdaddy & littlemama and "Miss Lucy & Chucky"
'02 Allegro Bay 35DB W22
"07 X Unlimited Wrangler
'05 Harley Trike
Our other coach is a school bus(yes, we both drive)

richmondmj

St. Cloud, Fl , USA

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Posted: 03/24/02 06:32pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wolfe10 is ABSOLUTELY correct. Don't take for granted you can inflate to what the owners manual says or the tire sidewall. Get the info from the tire mfg and weigh the vehicle. Pumping to max psi when running at a much lower weight can be just as dangerous as it being too low for a higher weight. The tire will wear in the middle and not as much of it is really contacting the road and holding the weight. Tires are designed to have the weight evenly distributed across the entire footprint.

wolfe10

Texas

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Posted: 03/26/02 07:52pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bob,

I am not sure I have an answer for you, but there are some questions I would ask:
1. Are wheel bearings adjusted properly?
2. Is your hitch height set so both trailer axles are carrying the same load/trailer level?
3. Have you had your tire gauge checked against a known good gauge-- most tire stores will gladly do this for you?
4. Are the worn areas (inside and outside) of the tire smooth or scrubbed? If scrubbed, this can ge a sign of alignment problems.
5. Have you checked the trailer axles for alignment (so they are tracking straight, not "dog-tracking"?
6. Are the tires in balance?
7. Have you weighed your trailer axles in its "going down the road" loaded configuration with your tow vehicle loaded as usual?
8. Do you have shock absorbers?

I would get as many answers to these and I am sure other questions that do not come right to mind, then go to someone who specializes in trailer suspensions and have them look at it with you. Good luck

Fulltimer50

Yankton, SD

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Posted: 03/25/02 05:49pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Most every truck stop has a certified weigh scale.


George

2011 F350 PSD CC LB 4X4 DRW Lariate
2013 Lifestyle LS37RESL 5th Wheel

Lonnie

Breese, Il 62230

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Posted: 03/24/02 06:54pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the info. Now all I need to do is find a place to weight it.

fixruprbob

Raleigh, NC USA

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Posted: 03/26/02 07:34pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hello wolfe10, I found your post very interesting. My TT manufacturer says I need 65 psi to achieve the max GAWR (4800 pounds or 1200 per tire). My dealer says to use 60 pounds. My tire manufacturer says 65 psi even though my (measured) tire load is only 75% of the maximum 1660 pounds (each). After 10,000 miles I show significant wear on the inside and outside edges of all tires (classic underinflation pattern). I expect that I will have to buy new tires in about another 5000 miles. My actual tire pressure to date has been 60 psi. Today, after looking at the tires again I decided to address the wear issue, which appears to be underinflation, and increased the pressure to 65.

At this point I do not think anyone is telling me the whole truth. I am curious as to what your take on this would be.


Bob

*This Message was edited on 26-Mar-02 07:37 PM by fixruprbob*



Robert

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