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SunTen

Kansas

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Posted: 12/13/11 10:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you have a 5th wheel you have a skirt made to go all the way around it. Purchase a heated water hose for your water hookup. In the up front storage I purchased at Amazon.com a programable outlet which I programed for 65 degrees. Plugged a heater into it so it would turn it on and off as needed. Put a wireless temperature monitor in the storage unit as well to monitor the temperature. Also put a wireless temperature monitor by the water hookup. Did not leave dump hose on all the time. Put it on once a week to dump then stored it. I also had a 100lb propane tank sitting on the outside so I did not have to move unit to replace propane.

We had 18 degree below tempuratures and had no problems freezing up. Everything stayed nice and toasty. With the skirt all the way around it also gave me a covered stoage area for the snow shovel, gas fire pit etc.

You just have to monitor things and you can RV all winter long. We had a friend who camped with us in is motor coach. The only thing different was he did not need a skirt.

It is important to block the wind from moving a lot under the unit. This year we are going to put some simple insulation sheets in the back of the cupboards because we seemed to get some cold from there.

It is fun RVing year round.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 01/05/12 11:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi freek_zero,

I've never long term winter camped, but I have used my RV at -37 C (-34 F) with only 15 amp shore power.

I've boondocked for a week where the maximum temperature was -27 C (-15 F). I did run a generator for about 5 hours per day. I was not in the RV in the day time and used my stove top as a blue flame heater while I was not inside. The furnace was turned down as low as it would go during day time--not to conserve propane but to conserve battery power.

I did not run the generator while sleeping. I did use a 12 volt electric heating blanket.

I don't know about Class A rv's but I can tell you that a Class C is quite "sure footed" in snow.

So, yes, it is quite possible to travel and camp in extreme cold.

freek_zero wrote:

Having said that, there is one thing I haven't been able to figure yet: almost all the winter RVing talk is focused on setting up long term in a park. I'm looking to stay mobile, not more than a few days at any given spot, and preferably not in a park. Is this all but impossible? Or doable so long as one stays out of -40 temps and doesn't expect a summer's day inside temp? (I am at 15C or less inside at home anyway, so I'm quite happy with cool interior temps) I'm guessing the biggest issues are going to be heating costs (even with a good insulated setup), and finding a place to get water and dump.



Regards, Don
Full Time in a Kustom Koach Class C 28'5", 256 watts Unisolar, 875 amp hours in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 2500 MSW watt inverter.

SunTen

Kansas

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Posted: 01/06/12 07:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The biggest concern for winter camping is to make sure you do not freeze your pipes. You can still be mobile but I would think you need the heat going through the vents to keep the pipes from freezing.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 01/12/12 09:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi SunTen,

That's exactly why I added dual window fans to replace the return air grill on the furnace. They are thermostatically controlled and run off my inverter while traveling.

SunTen wrote:

The biggest concern for winter camping is to make sure you do not freeze your pipes. You can still be mobile but I would think you need the heat going through the vents to keep the pipes from freezing.


WyoTraveler

Northwest, Wyoming

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Posted: 01/13/12 01:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some of the heat tape that you can buy will indicate that it is not for use on plastic or rubber hose. The reason is the heat distribution from the built in thermostat. I wrap my hose with either aluminum foil or a conductive aluminum tape to distribute the heat. I then install the heat tape and attach it with black electrical tape. I have never had a problem. Most important thing, it doesn't do any good to heat the hose if the faucet isn't protected. Some people believe that an anti freeze faucet doesn't freeze. It doesn't freeze only because the water is drained out when you shut it off. There is no protection to the faucet when it is turned on. The faucet must have heat tape on it going down about 5 ft into the ground if it is going to be left on. Some of the faucets have insulating tubes with air space around them going down 5 ft so the ground heat will keep it from freezing.


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mustex

NZ

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Posted: 01/15/12 01:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am planning to spend a year in canada.

If i winterize the freshwater tank, can I use the grey and blackwater tanks without risk of pipes freezing?

How do the black and grey water tanks work? Is it directly linked vertically or does it travel horizontally as well?

Does anyone know what temperature the heat tapes are useful down to?

Are space heaters in the tank cavity useful?

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 01/15/12 07:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi mustex,

Most of the year Canada will have temperatures well above freezing. I live in one of the coldest parts of the country and freezing is a concern from the middle of October until the end of March, though of course that varies. I use my RV year round, and simply winterize after any trip.

You will need to look for a so called "four seasons" RV that has a heated "basement". Read the entire thread for lots of suggestions. Since you will be full timing, it make be good to add some modifications to any RV to keep it comfy.

Often there is a horizontal run for both grey and black water tanks.

Here is a link where you can look up the weather "history" of the locations you plan on going to: weather underground

* This post was edited 01/15/12 07:23am by pianotuna *

mustex

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Posted: 01/15/12 07:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

How are the compartments heated? 12v electric or propane furnace?

rehoppe

Denver & Nathrop Colo or somewhere else

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Posted: 01/15/12 07:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Heat tape is only as good as the insulation you surround the tanks and pipes with. Without a combination of heat and insulation, you are just swimming upstream.

I would suggest some kind of 'skirting' as well. It helps a bunch, although Not a complete solution.


Hoppe
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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 01/15/12 09:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi mustex,

This is covered earlier in the thread. Do please read it all carefully and make notes, before asking more questions.

The compartments are usually by the propane furnace, but sometimes 12 volt, and in my case retro fitted 120 volt.

mustex wrote:

How are the compartments heated? 12v electric or propane furnace?


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