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Topic: EcoRoamer: High-tech, zombie-proof survival RV

Posted By: Geewizard on 11/19/10 09:01am

I think we've all seen this before but maybe not in the mainstream news.

EcoRoamer in mainstream news


Outfitter Apex 8
Toyota Tundra Double Cab

Mt Robson, Canada 2004


Posted By: Red, on 11/19/10 09:44am



Everyone wants to be GREEN . . .

Red, *<(:{)-


Posted By: ChefP on 11/19/10 02:22pm



It ain't easy bein' green.......


Dave & Jami
1988 Terry Resort 18D, our first TT!
1984 Chaparral 172
2005 Durango Hemi Ltd.
Home is where you park it!



Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 11/19/10 03:05pm

Maybe I missed it, but did they mention if that thing had a furnace and air conditioner outside of the systems built into the cab?


My Blog - The Journey of the Redneck Express
CB Channel 17 Redneck Express
'1992 Dodge W-250 "Dually" Power Wagon - Club Cab Long Bed 4x4 V8 5.9L gashog w/4.10 Geared axles
'1974 KIT Kamper 1106 - 11' Slide-in
'2006 Heartland BigHorn 3400RL



Posted By: silversand on 11/19/10 03:33pm

....interesting. It would be productive to see some of those technologies in great detail.

The article title mentions, "...Zombie-proof..." What's that? Never a mention of this term in the article ?

Silver-


Silver
2004 Chevy Silverado 2500HD 4x4 6.0L Ext/LB Tow Package 4L80E Michelin AT2s| Outfitter Caribou


Posted By: Photomike on 11/19/10 03:41pm

Here is some more information

Eco Expedition Portal

Ecoroamer Website


2002 GMC 2500HD 4x4 4 Door
1992 Northern Lite 9'- 6" Camper with cargo trailer for hauling supplies
Advanced Elements Kayaks
Border Collie Guard Dog

Paterson Photography Web Site



Posted By: silversand on 11/19/10 03:56pm

....thanks PhotoMike for the additional links!

Cheers,
Silver-


Posted By: Handbasket on 11/19/10 05:40pm

silversand wrote:

....interesting. It would be productive to see some of those technologies in great detail.

The article title mentions, "...Zombie-proof..." What's that? Never a mention of this term in the article ?

Silver-


It's a minor pop-culture thing... google 'Zombie Apocalypse' and read the Wikipedia article if you're interested.

Jim, "He who laughs last, thinks slowest."


'06 Tiger CX 'C Minus' on a Silverado 2500HD 4x4, 8.1 & Allison (aka 'Loafer's Glory')


Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 11/19/10 05:52pm

And don't forget Zombie Flash Mobs Gotta google zombie flash mobs .


Posted By: Geewizard on 11/19/10 05:59pm

We've got zombies up here. Glad my Outfitter is zombie-modded.

And I don't get how this thing is labeled EcoRoamer when it gets....6.5 mpg.


Posted By: silversand on 11/20/10 05:30am

....thanks guys, for the Zombie references. I'll read the Wiki on it...

Gee:

I think 6.5 miles/gallon (US gallon?) may be offset by the other benefits this vehicle brings to the 3rd-World communities they plan on visiting/working in/with:

-massive water purification system they plan on offering to villagers they encounter in their travels;
-educational systems they will be delivering to villages;
-a minor consideration is consuming vegetable oils in their diesel engine (when they can find enough of it) that would normally be thrown out...

It's tough to calculate, but one can actually calculate their ecological footprint (a thesis that every person on Earth could write on themselves on how their being (consumption) fits within the/our biosphere...kind of).

I've been reading their prolific web Portal; exhausting dedication, lots of preparation...

Thanks for Posting the info!

On edit: Zombies (well, its part of the article!)

"The literary subtext of a zombie apocalypse is usually that civilization is inherently fragile in the face of truly unprecedented threats and that most individuals cannot be relied upon to support the greater good if the personal cost becomes too high" (Fong, 2008)

Zombies are a metaphor for fragility of global humanity when facing unprecedented threat. Interesting. I trend towards Noetic theorem (the idea's principal proponent is NASA astronaut and moon hiker Edgar D. Mitchell), contra to the Zombie behavioral theory...

Cheers,
Silver-

* This post was edited 11/20/10 05:44am by silversand *


Posted By: Geewizard on 11/20/10 07:33am

Awww, Silver....zombies are merely the undead and need to be shot real bad before they infect you. Nothing more. Just ask any kid 8-28. Don't read too much into them.

I stand by my analysis of the EcoRoamer as being not too Eco. I think this guy wanted to create an interesting vehicle and explore the world with his family. As he states: "We are calling the project ECO-ROAMER and the intention is to build it in as environmentally friendly a manner as a diesel-belching-round-the-world-20,000-pound-truck can be..."

He's not out to save the world.


Posted By: buta4 on 11/20/10 12:27pm

I believe one item missing from a "survival" point-of-view is an option that was offered by EarthRoamer on their vehicles.

Maintains positive air flow within the camper through various filters to defeat Nuclear, Biological and Chemical events, forest fire smoke, etc. Can be manually run in case of camper power failure.


Filter Clicky


I would, if it were my rig, also install the following item which uses main engine power in lieu of a "normal" generator, to supply mucho AC power to whatever needs it, such as a large home, etc.

(Can also be used to power up the launching apparatus for the Photon Torpedoes, )

Main Engine Power Clicky

* This post was last edited 11/20/10 12:54pm by buta4 *


Ray


Posted By: Northern Explorer on 11/20/10 03:23pm

great rig...great people



Posted By: RobertRyan on 11/20/10 04:22pm

Quote:

believe one item missing from a "survival" point-of-view is an option that was offered by EarthRoamer on their vehicles.

Maintains positive air flow within the camper through various filters to defeat Nuclear, Biological and Chemical events, forest fire smoke, etc. Can be manually run in case of campe

A system or similar system used in Australian Off Road Caravans, to keep Bull Dust a red fine clay out of the Caravan.


Posted By: RobertRyan on 11/20/10 04:28pm

Quote:

Gee:

I think 6.5 miles/gallon (US gallon?) may be offset by the other benefits this vehicle brings to the 3rd-World communities they plan on visiting/working in/with:

-massive water purification system they plan on offering to villagers they encounter in their travels;
-educational systems they will be delivering to villages;
-a minor consideration is consuming vegetable oils in their diesel engine (when they can find enough of it) that would normally be thrown out...

It's tough to calculate, but one can actually calculate their ecological footprint (a thesis that every person on Earth could write on themselves on how their being (consumption) fits within the/our biosphere...kind of).

I've been reading their prolific web Portal; exhausting dedication, lots of preparation...

The real problem I have with their preparation is the F650 they are using. Parts for a F650 are rarer than hens teeth outside North America.
Our Dick Smith had a F550 based Earthroamer backed by Ford US. It broke down everywhere. He eventually had to leave it in Mongolia for 6 months while Ford organized a repair team to fix it. A Cabover European or Japanese based TV would be a much better bet.


Posted By: RobertRyan on 11/20/10 06:09pm

Nonetheless Jay said to me in an email, that they were pretty limited in choices fitting the criteria they wanted and the F650 fitted those criteria the best out of the choices they had.


Posted By: canuck 1 on 11/21/10 09:14pm

We saw this thing a couple of days ago and all I can say is that it is bloody huge and sure stands out in a crowd... Enjoy your trip


Posted By: McZippie on 11/21/10 09:54pm

Here's another link
Popular Mechanics

* This post was edited 11/21/10 10:14pm by McZippie *


2009 Ford E350 Diesel Cutaway Limo Bus
2010 Jeep JKU Rubicon (Toad)
1942 Bantam T3 Trailer



Posted By: McZippie on 11/21/10 10:09pm

Geewizard wrote:


I stand by my analysis of the EcoRoamer as being not too Eco. I think this guy wanted to create an interesting vehicle and explore the world with his family. As he states: "We are calling the project ECO-ROAMER and the intention is to build it in as environmentally friendly a manner as a diesel-belching-round-the-world-20,000-pound-truck can be..."

He's not out to save the world.


Read his blog, he has some wacky ideas... he is an Ecotopian that either has himself fooled or wants to fool others that he is doing his part to help save the world.

Here's a picture of the owner sporting a 'red star' Mao Cap on top of the EcoRoamer at Burning Man... A symbolism trifecta in one picture.




Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 11/22/10 01:21pm

Yeah, the Hat + Burning man just made me lose any respect I might have had for the guy for building the rig.


Posted By: btggraphix on 11/22/10 01:34pm

You know - as far as being "Eco", 6.5MPG may no sound like a lot, but if you lived in it for 3 years, not moving constantly.....compare that to the carbon footprint of your house. How many KWH's does your house use? How much water?

I'd be willing to bet that living in that camper for 3 years you'd be using a lot less of the planet's resources that the average house.


2006 LanceMax 1191 - loaded and well-used
2005 C4500/Kodiak 4x4, GVWR 17,500



Posted By: sabconsulting on 11/22/10 03:20pm

Impressive rig, but I still think that travelling through parts of the world where people struggle to pay for oil to cook with in a vehicle that does 6.5mpg (I think 44 ton lorries in Europe achieve better than that) isn't really setting the right 'eco' example.

Plus, in what situation does it achieve 6.5mpg? Is that on nice smooth US blacktop, or in low-ratio struggling through North-African soft sand or sub-Saharan African mud? Could that actually be 3.5mpg in those situations?

My preference would be for something built on a light commercial vehicle common in the parts of the world visited (for parts availability and local repair with hammer and welding torch), e.g. a light Mercedes truck that is also narrow enough to cope with tracks designed to take Land Rovers and Landcruisers. Then fit it out with practical, easily cleaned fittings like you see in South Arican off-road campers rather than the heavy-looking luxury domestic-style stuff shown in the pictures. Would be interesting to see how that designer interior holds up after the extreme pot holed roads of the third world, thousands of miles of washboard corrugations and that talcum-style dust you always get on African tracks that gets in absolutely everywhere.

Steve.


'07 Ford Ranger XLT Supercab diesel + '91 Shadow Cruiser - Sky Cruiser 1
'92 Suzuki Samurai 4x4 1.6
'09 Fiat Panda 1.2
'10 Citroen DS3 1.6 turbo



Posted By: silversand on 11/22/10 03:47pm

Matt:

What hat? Wearing a hat can destroy your credibility? Must be one heck of a hat! What's "Burning Man" ?

BTG is very correct:

The demands of a house are enormous. Especially if you heat and/or air condition it. We use eco-toilets that flush very little water; our house is extraordinarily-well insulated (takes ~~4 days for 90F weather to knock us out inside the house in summer before we need air conditioning); we've kept our house above 61F with 14 candles burning during a 6-hour power failure in 15F storm a few years ago. But still, most houses are terribly designed, built and insulated. So, if you drive the truck in question sparingly, and live in it permanently, you'd def. have an ecological footprint just a fraction that of a house (most homes)...

Traveling in Africa with that huge truck:

That quoted 6.5 MPG is probably an average driving in 1st World conditions (USA and perhaps Mexico). However, I agree with your speculation that such a large truck in Africa/African-like road/sand/washboard conditions would perhaps get 2 to 4 MPG.

S-


Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 11/22/10 04:46pm

silversand wrote:

Matt:

What hat? Wearing a hat can destroy your credibility? Must be one heck of a hat! What's "Burning Man" ?

S-


Do you really want me to start a political discussion and get this thread closed faster than a case of whiplash in a car wreck?

http://forums.woodalls.com/index.cfm/fus........d/24576025/gotomsg/24583235.cfm#24583235

That entry in this thread answers the Hat question and basically sums up alot of why I lost the little respect I begrudged him.

* This post was edited 11/22/10 04:56pm by JoeChiOhki *


Posted By: btggraphix on 11/22/10 05:47pm

sabconsulting wrote:

Impressive rig, but I still think that travelling through parts of the world where people struggle to pay for oil to cook with in a vehicle that does 6.5mpg (I think 44 ton lorries in Europe achieve better than that) isn't really setting the right 'eco' example.

Plus, in what situation does it achieve 6.5mpg? Is that on nice smooth US blacktop, or in low-ratio struggling through North-African soft sand or sub-Saharan African mud? Could that actually be 3.5mpg in those situations?

My preference would be for something built on a light commercial vehicle common in the parts of the world visited (for parts availability and local repair with hammer and welding torch), e.g. a light Mercedes truck that is also narrow enough to cope with tracks designed to take Land Rovers and Landcruisers. Then fit it out with practical, easily cleaned fittings like you see in South Arican off-road campers rather than the heavy-looking luxury domestic-style stuff shown in the pictures. Would be interesting to see how that designer interior holds up after the extreme pot holed roads of the third world, thousands of miles of washboard corrugations and that talcum-style dust you always get on African tracks that gets in absolutely everywhere.

Steve.


Well, you'd have to check out his websites (or the expedition portal) to see more detail. It is pretty much built like a brick....outhouse I guess. Things may fail, but nothing like our manufactured TC's.

The thing is, we all have different ideas of what we'd want to have/build/travel in when out in third world countries. And truth-be-told, you start reading enough about people's experiences and what worked and what didn't....you find that you can't really build something large and comfortable enough to WANT to live in for 3 years that can go everywhere you might want to go. So you don't have to build it for going where a Land Rover goes. You still do your major traveling on moderate roads and you go ride chicken-buses, or motorcycles, or bikes, or rickshaws, or boats, or on foot to get out and explore furthur.

I really feel like those that actually get out there and do these things have a whole lot more to say than us arm-chair expeditionists. Keep in mind, there are people out there driving 2WD 1970's motorhomes around central and south america and making do. The guy that setup my truck/TC did a 32,000 mile trip from Maryland to Panama, shipped it by boat to Peru, then continued on south as far as Argentina, and then shipped it back to Panama from Brazil and drove on home. With an off-the-shelf truck and camper. In some ways, I'm amazed the Lance didn't fall apart....but it's still going. What keeps the rest of us from doing that? Lack of the right rig or lack of the time/money/desire?

I think the primary problems with the F550 expedition mentioned by RobertRyan had to do with the Ford engine. This F650 has a Cat diesel (and different running gear).....which has to be a lot better engine then a 6.0L diesel from Ford - and probably easier to get worked on (relative to a Ford Powerstroke anyway.)

I say more power to him. I wouldn't do what he's doing, but more power to him.


Posted By: Geewizard on 11/22/10 06:19pm

JoeChiOhki wrote:

silversand wrote:

Matt:

What hat? Wearing a hat can destroy your credibility? Must be one heck of a hat! What's "Burning Man" ?

S-


Do you really want me to start a political discussion and get this thread closed faster than a case of whiplash in a car wreck?

http://forums.woodalls.com/index.cfm/fus........d/24576025/gotomsg/24583235.cfm#24583235

That entry in this thread answers the Hat question and basically sums up alot of why I lost the little respect I begrudged him.


A hat can say a lot. Like CAT or Deere or yALE or NRA or FIB.
Doesn't mean I'm a CAT or a Deere or I went to yALE or anything. I'd hope people wouldn't judge me or lose what little respect they might have for me based on my hat!

Anyhow, The EcoRoamer was up here in AK this summer. I saw it. I was in awe. And I don't think he could take it places I've been with my Rice Wagon and Outfitter. It's just too big.


Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 11/22/10 06:41pm

Geewizard wrote:

JoeChiOhki wrote:

silversand wrote:

Matt:

What hat? Wearing a hat can destroy your credibility? Must be one heck of a hat! What's "Burning Man" ?

S-


Do you really want me to start a political discussion and get this thread closed faster than a case of whiplash in a car wreck?

http://forums.woodalls.com/index.cfm/fus........d/24576025/gotomsg/24583235.cfm#24583235

That entry in this thread answers the Hat question and basically sums up alot of why I lost the little respect I begrudged him.


A hat can say a lot. Like CAT or Deere or yALE or NRA or FIB.
Doesn't mean I'm a CAT or a Deere or I went to yALE or anything. I'd hope people wouldn't judge me or lose what little respect they might have for me based on my hat!


Wearing a hat about a product or a school is entirely different matter than wearing a symbol of Communist Dictatorship that banned churches and has tortured and killed innocents.


Posted By: McZippie on 11/22/10 08:30pm

silversand wrote:

Matt:
What hat? Wearing a hat can destroy your credibility? Must be one heck of a hat! What's "Burning Man" ?


Wiki Burning Man

More about Burning Man


Posted By: Geewizard on 11/22/10 09:24pm

Joe, you mean that red star bothers you?

Ok, ok, moderator, that's all on this subject, I promise!


Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 11/22/10 10:15pm

Geewizard wrote:

Joe, you mean that red star bothers you?

Ok, ok, moderator, that's all on this subject, I promise!


Yup, that
red star hat bothers me quite a bit.


Posted By: RobertRyan on 11/22/10 11:49pm

Quote:

I think the primary problems with the F550 expedition mentioned by RobertRyan had to do with the Ford engine. This F650 has a Cat diesel (and different running gear).....which has to be a lot better engine then a 6.0L diesel from Ford - and probably easier to get worked on (relative to a Ford Powerstroke anyway.)

More than the Engine. From memory gearbox and differential? as well. I know the Camper had some problems too. Dick was not a happy camper at the end of the trip.


Quote:

My preference would be for something built on a light commercial vehicle common in the parts of the world visited (for parts availability and local repair with hammer and welding torch), e.g. a light Mercedes truck that is also narrow enough to cope with tracks designed to take Land Rovers and Landcruisers. Then fit it out with practical, easily cleaned fittings like you see in South Arican off-road campers rather than the heavy-looking luxury domestic-style stuff shown in the pictures. Would be interesting to see how that designer interior holds up after the extreme pot holed roads of the third world, thousands of miles of washboard corrugations and that talcum-style dust you always get on African tracks that gets in absolutely everywhere.

Jay found those sort of vehicles are not readily available in the US, so the F650 is a compromise for either a European/ Japanese MDT truck that could have been used. What Japanese trucks that are available in the US were really too light for what he wanted.


Posted By: Handbasket on 11/23/10 07:20am

For any who haven't seen it before, here's a good cross section of what the rest of the world uses for overland travel: http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10612. My favorite is #205 on p.21 .

Jim, "Mo' coffee!"


Posted By: sabconsulting on 11/23/10 11:08am

Handbasket wrote:

My favorite is #205 on p.21


Hmmm, now I wonder why you like that one?

Personally I think #77 on page 8 is clearly the one to have! Including the quality selection of randomly sized tyres on the trailer (sorry, luxury accommodation module). Plus you can see they keep their water supply mounted to (well, stuffed into) the front counterweight to improve the COG.

Steve.


Posted By: Photomike on 11/23/10 11:20am

sabconsulting wrote:

Handbasket wrote:

My favorite is #205 on p.21


Hmmm, now I wonder why you like that one?

Personally I think #77 on page 8 is clearly the one to have! Including the quality selection of randomly sized tyres on the trailer (sorry, luxury accommodation module). Plus you can see they keep their water supply mounted to (well, stuffed into) the front counterweight to improve the COG.

Steve.


#77 I would be afraid of a high speed blow out with those tires. Would not want to max out the tractor as you could loose control if a tire blew.

#79 just below it is a lot safer. Those tires would last a lot longer.

#205 could not be called and expedition vehicle as it has too many luxuries


Posted By: McZippie on 11/23/10 03:06pm

Here's a nice on-going build of a luxury expedition rig.
Used an old U-haul box as a base for the house.

http://bulletxv.wordpress.com/


Posted By: Geewizard on 11/23/10 01:01pm

JoeChiOhki wrote:

Geewizard wrote:

Joe, you mean that red star bothers you?

Ok, ok, moderator, that's all on this subject, I promise!


Yup, that
red star hat bothers me quite a bit.


I don't disagree, Joe. That hat and what it represents scare me as much as the Soviet Union did when I practiced those "hide under your desks from the atomic bombs" drills as a kid.


Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 11/23/10 01:32pm

Geewizard wrote:

JoeChiOhki wrote:

Geewizard wrote:

Joe, you mean that red star bothers you?

Ok, ok, moderator, that's all on this subject, I promise!


Yup, that
red star hat bothers me quite a bit.


I don't disagree, Joe. That hat and what it represents scare me as much as the Soviet Union did when I practiced those "hide under your desks from the atomic bombs" drills as a kid.


I have a few remnants from those days in my collection, mostly old Fall Out Shelter signs, and I've been trying to get a copy of a sign that used to be here in Portland that had instructions on it on what to do in case of a nuclear attack.

The cold war was winding down by the time I was a kid during it, so I missed alot of the scarier parts.


Posted By: McZippie on 11/23/10 03:18pm

Geewizard wrote:

JoeChiOhki wrote:

Geewizard wrote:

Joe, you mean that red star bothers you?

Ok, ok, moderator, that's all on this subject, I promise!


Yup, that
red star hat bothers me quite a bit.


I don't disagree, Joe. That hat and what it represents scare me as much as the Soviet Union did when I practiced those "hide under your desks from the atomic bombs" drills as a kid.


Id suspect the owner of the Rig wants to project an image of his political believes by wearing a Mao Cap, but to many, who understand the terror of totalitarian communism, it's as repulsive as someone wearing a Nazi Swastika.

He built a nice Rig for his family to see the world, but it's kind of foolish to foist all the eco friendly nonsense about the Rig and the Trip.

* This post was edited 11/23/10 03:24pm by McZippie *


Posted By: sabconsulting on 11/23/10 11:58pm

McZippie wrote:

Here's a nice on-going build of a luxury expedition rig.
Used an old U-haul box as a base for the house.

http://bulletxv.wordpress.com/


That is a beautiful job he is doing there - some real craftsmanship.

Steve.


Posted By: jayandalice on 12/07/10 12:23am

Hi All,
I'm Jay Shapiro, the builder / owner of the EcoRoamer discussed in this thread. There's been some great questions and some (not so great) accusations here, So I really appreciate the rv.net administrators giving me the chance to unlock the thread to clear them up.

First off there was some discussion of whether or not I am a "Maoist Commie", based on a HAT in a picture that somebody posted.

Guys, that's not even ME in the picture! If you look on the www.ecoroamer.com website you will see dozens of pictures of me, but that's not one of them. Also, just for the record, the hat in question is from Vietnam, and the person wearing it was a trader on Wall St. Definitely not a Maoist.

NOT me. (though a funny picture of a Wall St. banker in a costume)


THIS is me. (the one with the beard)

NOTE: the HAT, since theat seems to be so important. It is from The Muskoka Foundation - my non-profit charity that encourages RVers & Overland Travelers to do volunteer work with children in orphanages and shelters, during your travels.

I'm also not an "ecotopian", but I do believe that anyone building/traveling in an RV has an obligation to think about the impact of their travel, and ideally reduce that impact. To that end, we created the Ecoroamer, if for nothing else than to start these kinds of discussions, and to get people thinking about the issues.


The EcoRoamer in Alaska - Please note: The glacier was already melting before the EcoRoamer arrived...

So what about the Ecoroamer itself?

The 6.5 mpg quoted is a rough average based on 40,000 miles of traveling, substantially on corrugated, dirt, mountain roads. Yes, it is likely to be lower than that in Africa. But the mpg only tells a small part of the story...

First, whenever possible, those gallons are made up of 100% recycled waste veggie oil. Reducing the environmental/security impact of getting the oil we burn.

Second, that 6.5 figure includes running our alternators that run (through batteries) our lights, our cooking, our laundry, our entire office, etc. The heater and domestic water heater run off the bio-diesel as well. All of which is backed up by our solar panels. So overall our footprint is tiny compared to what most people use in their 2,000 sq.ft house + an office + a classroom, even with the impact of our driving around the world.

Then, we offset every gram of CO2 the truck produces, through investments in wind turbines. Now, we know that carbon credits are far from perfect, but how many more wind turbines are there now, reducing our dependence on oil/gas/coal, because of it? I think that in the end, it helps.

Lastly, there was some discussion about Dick in Australia and how his Earthroamer died leaving him stranded on his trip. That is a big reason why we chose the F650 with the cat c7 engine. This engine is used by Cat in power generators and construction equipment in over 130 countries. Together with the Alison transmission, we know there are parts and trained service techs all around the world. Not something that could be said about a 6L Ford F550, Mercedes van or any of the Rams.

Anyhow, I am delighted that the conversation is even happening, and I hope I have given you some more food for thought.

Please follow our adventures at www.Ecoroamer.com and feel free to contact me through our CONTACT forms there.

Cheers,
Jay.


Jay & Alice - www.ontheroadlesstravelled.com
Based in Singapore, Travelling the world
...one dirt road at a time!


2007 - Ford F-650 EcoRoamer 4x4 Expedition Vehicle



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