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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > 2004 Keystone Outback 21RS AC Electrical Problem

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tx97z71

Oklahoma

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Posted: 10/20/11 06:59pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hello folks. As I'm a new camper owner, I've spent a lot of time reading this forum and learning. I have an AC electrical problem I hope some of you can assist me with.

The problem: The outlets located next to the kitchen counter, in the bench under the table, and outside under the kitchen window quit.

Troubleshooting: Only one GFCI outlet in the camper, and it checks out. Voltmeter on the outlets shows 86 VAC. Breaker output tested good at 120 VAC.

As I have no wiring diagram for the trailer, I"m guessing on the wiring route. It appears to me that it runs from the breaker up the wall, through the ceiling, and down to the kitchen counter outlet. I removed these wiring from the outlet to check voltage on the wire: 86 VAC again.

I have a lot of experience with electricity, but this one has me stumped. Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks!![emoticon][emoticon]

hmknightnc

Wilmington, NC

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Posted: 10/20/11 07:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

86 volts is really weird! Since it only has 1 hot with no load you should have 120 volts hot to neutral and hot to ground when testing. Only thing I can think of to try is to trip the GFCI outlet and see if you lose all power at the questioned outlets (you should). This will simply verify those outlets are on the GFCI circuit (sounds like they should be based on location). I would then replace the GFCI outlet and try it again.

Are hooked up to a power source you know is good (sounds like it is since the breaker output is right)?

tx97z71

Oklahoma

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Posted: 10/20/11 07:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

hmknightnc,
Doh!! don't know why I didn't think of that. The outlets in question are on the line side of the bathroom GFCI. Just verified that they go completely dead when the GFCI is tripped. The campground I am in has solid AC power. I'll try to a replacement GFCI as soon as I can. I'm still bugged about the voltage drop. I've never seen that before.

Thanks!!

tx97z71

Oklahoma

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Posted: 10/20/11 07:58pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Update: Just pulled the GFCI in the bathroom to take a look at the wiring. Neutral conductor on the load side shows heat damage to the insulation and the housing around where the wire pushes into the outlet appears melted. GFCI never tripped. Any ideas as to what might be the cause? Thanks!!

hmknightnc

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Posted: 10/20/11 08:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Simple bad connection at the neutral in the outlet. The GFCI senses current flow in the ground line. If there was no current flow on ground the GFCI wouldn't trip. Cut off the bad portion of wire and replace the GFCI outlet

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

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Posted: 10/21/11 03:47pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

hmknightnc wrote:

Simple bad connection at the neutral in the outlet. The GFCI senses current flow in the ground line. If there was no current flow on ground the GFCI wouldn't trip. Cut off the bad portion of wire and replace the GFCI outlet


GFI does NOT directly sense current in the ground line, in fact they will work on ungrounded circuits. If it sensed current in the ground wire it would be of marginal use for personal protection since seldom would an individual be across the hot and ground wire on a circuit. Normal situation for electric shock is between the hot and earth ground or hot and neutral in a circuit.

What a GFI does is sense the difference in current between the hot and neutral lines. If there is a difference, it means there is a leakage path to earth ground (not necessarily the grounded wire) somewhere and it trips.


2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
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hmknightnc

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Posted: 10/22/11 04:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs: You are correct sir. I stand corrected on my mis-statement

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