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Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes

 > tire pressure

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STEVEP220

VA.

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Posted: 06/07/12 10:35am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I just weight my motor home.I am a little confused about what tire pressure to use .I have michelin 235x80 R22.5 XRV tires. When I use the chart it tells me to put 98 psi (load 4330 per tire)in front tires and 83 psi( load 7150 per tire) in each rear dual tire. The placard in the motor home states to use 110 psi in all tires. What pressure should I use and should I use same pressure in all tires or same amount in each tire on that axle? Example 98psi in all tires or 98 psi front and 83 psi all rear tires. Thanks for the help.

steveownby

Cosby, TN

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Posted: 06/07/12 11:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm a little confused because all the tire load charts I have seen, increase in 5 psi steps. Are you extrapolating because your weight falls between pressure levels? If so there is no need to be that precise. Did you get each tire position weighed or each axle? If each axle then I would put about 105 psi in each steer tire. The pressure you quote for the drive tires is per pair of duals not per tire. So you are at a drive axle weight of something over 14,000. Again to allow for one side being heavier than the other I would increase between 5-10 lbs.
Remember, this psi is the minimum psi required to carry the rated weight. Always err to the high side.


Steve Ownby
2003 Monaco Signature

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snail

south west Florida

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Posted: 06/08/12 06:13pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You'll get many answers on this one. I've been battling this question for about 4 years now and have decided to run all my tires at the pressure stated as max on the tire. For mine that is 120 to 125. I did this after having the coach in the shop again for tire wear problems. I see no serious change in ride and the tire wear problem seems to be history.

good luck


DRIVE A 2001 NEWMAR DUTCH STAR WITH 330 HP CUMMINS AND TOW A RANGER 4X4. TRAVEL WITH SPOUSE AND PET TINKER BELL OUR CORGIE.


Jackha1949

Any Where USA

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Posted: 06/07/12 11:17am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A lot depends on the load range of the tire itself, so I have been told. My MH has listed 120 psi front and 95 psi on the rear tires, however, that is for load range H tires. I just had new tires put on our "new to us" MH and I did not know that the RV dealer put on load range G tires, so my front tires have to be at 110 psi and rear 90 psi, that is according to Winnebago. So I go with their recommendations seeing they built the MH. Tire pressure can be quite confusing I have to agree!


Jack & Peg
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Sioux Falls, SD
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steveownby

Cosby, TN

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Posted: 06/07/12 12:10pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In your situation, I would use 105 psi in the steer axle tires and 90 psi in the drive axle tires. The weight you are at is your GVW. There is a placard close to the driver position that should list you GVWR, which should be somewhere between 24-26k.the difference between your GVWR and GVW is how much move you can carry. Be aware however, that the GVWR is actually divided into 2 axle weight ratings and you should not exceed the axle weight either, so it's very hard to fully utilize the full GVWR.

STEVEP220

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Posted: 06/07/12 11:45am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My weight was per axle 8660 lbs front axle and 14300 lbs rear dual axle. Yes my chart does go up by 5 psi. I have a actual gvwr 22960 lbs.

wolfe10

Texas

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Posted: 06/08/12 06:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

snail wrote:

You'll get many answers on this one. I've been battling this question for about 4 years now and have decided to run all my tires at the pressure stated as max on the tire. For mine that is 120 to 125. I did this after having the coach in the shop again for tire wear problems. I see no serious change in ride and the tire wear problem seems to be history.

good luck


Sadly, the PSI to carry the maximum load MAY be close to what YOU need.

But, others may be WAY over inflating were they to totally ignore all the work the tire manufacturers did to formulate the Inflation Charts.


Brett Wolfe
1997 Safari Sahara 3540
EX: 1993 Foretravel 36' U-240


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prstlk

Post Falls ID

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Posted: 06/08/12 07:13pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is a racers tip and keep in mind if you follow any pro car racing, like NASCAR, INDY, or drags tires are always a subject.

Get an inexpensive digital infrared thermometer. Harbor frieght, Lowes, HD etc.
Where you start with TP does not really matter. Go for a ride on the freeway/highway near you and get the tires to speed, slow down speed up as you normally would. With paper pen and thermo in hand stop at a parking lot and temp each tire dead center and 1/4 of inch in from each side. Be sure to temp the tread and not a grove.

The temp is not important, the temp at each of the three measuremnts is! They should all be the same!

If you find the center temp lower than the outside your are underinflated and putting to much weight on the outside of the tire.

If the center is higher that each side you are overinflated and placing too much on the center of the tire.

Also keep in mind that RVs are not as balanced or constant as car. Fresh/grey/black water will change the balance of the rig. Even empty of fluids you might find changes on the same axle inside tire or out due to heavy items above like a fridge.

If you get really off readings on the same tire outside inside outside you likley have alignment or balance issues.

The temp thing works but once again RV tires fail because of age and UV issues more than any other reason. Rarely does any RV tire "wear out" tires.

B careful and have fun!
Dash

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