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Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes

 > Winter living needs?

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sowego

northwestern corner of the Nebraska panhandle

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Posted: 07/16/12 09:15pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Despite what others say..."don't do it"...it is entirely doable. We have done it for years in our home location.

As another poster suggested you'll need more propane more often than you'll want to move the rig to refill so have no less than a 100 pounder at the ready and be able to refill as needed.

Yes bubble wrap for the windows is another option but you can get condensation & icing behind it. So during the day remove the insulating material to dry the frames and glass. The Oregon climate is much wetter and milder than our home location (we had temps down to -25 with single number humidity) so you will have to deal with getting rid of humidity versus our having to add to it. Keep all cabinets ventilated and packed very loosely, nothing up against the outside wall or it can get wet and mold. We always left one door of each cabinet section wide open to equalize temp and humidity. Running a propane furnace will actually dry out the air a lot if it runs often. Use a humidistat to monitor air moisture content.

Before the wet season starts be sure you have no leaks anywhere and that your window weep holes are clean and flowing freely.

Put down a few extra throw rugs because the floor can get a bit colder. And, have a way to cover your step well as those areas are notorious for being cold and drafty.

Do have a light ready to put in your water bay near the pump just in case the temps down there drop too low. In our region we found temps staying at 10 & lower for many hours we added the light or, even with the heat pumping into the water bay the pump would freeze. Be very careful with using a halogen light in any of the bays because they get too hot and can cause a fire &/or melt anything plastic near it. We used a regular 60 watt incandencent bulb.

Watch your refrigerator...if the weather gets really cold it can stop running and will not restart until it thaws. Do yourself a favor and shut off the icemaker, drain and disconnect the line or the outside valve can freeze.

You can use one small electric heater to warm up the colder drafty areas...and you will have them. We did not run ours any time we were asleep or were away because they too can be a fire hazzard, especially if you should have a pet that could knock them over.

We dumped our waste tanks then drained and stowed the sewer hose until the tank needed to be drained again. Fresh water hose...can be insulated but the faucet will also need to be insulated &/or have heat tape or you'll have a freeze up. We just filled the tank as needed then drained and stowed the hose in a warm bay. Hoses don't like cold and are very easily broken when frozen!


These are extreme measures for extreme cold. If your Oregon temps don't drop much below the teens you will not have as much to worry about as we did at sub-zero! However I'd be prepared for colder temps than you expect!

We fully agree that winter travel can be fun. Just be prepared for anything and you'll do fine!


2002 Tiffin Phaeton
2005 Malibu Maxx toad


rockhillmanor

On the Road

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Posted: 07/17/12 09:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Heated tanks" and "Heated Bays".....there is NO standard for these options. Manufacturers can do what they please and call them "heated".

ASK them to explain in detail just HOW these items are heated on the RV you decide on BEFORE you buy it! And it's been my experience is they will not be able to.

My heated tanks/bays consist of taking the bedroom heat duct and dividing it in half and routing one half to the sewage bay. My poop in the tank is warm and we are freezing when sleeping!

And again it might state it has thermo pane windows and considered Alaska proof but the windshield can NOT (by law) be thermo/dual pane glass period. That's a very big area for cold to come in.


"We must be willing to get rid of the life we've planned,
so as to have the life that is waiting for us".


louiskathy

Oregon (presently)

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Posted: 07/17/12 11:15am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rockhillmanor wrote:

"Heated tanks" and "Heated Bays".....there is NO standard for these options. Manufacturers can do what they please and call them "heated".

ASK them to explain in detail just HOW these items are heated on the RV you decide on BEFORE you buy it! And it's been my experience is they will not be able to.

My heated tanks/bays consist of taking the bedroom heat duct and dividing it in half and routing one half to the sewage bay. My poop in the tank is warm and we are freezing when sleeping!

And again it might state it has thermo pane windows and considered Alaska proof but the windshield can NOT (by law) be thermo/dual pane glass period. That's a very big area for cold to come in.


Our Winnebago has the vents in the floor. Those vents are what are heating the bays. Not much heat. Air circulation is as important as "heat".

One other suggestion... If you have a screen door on your rig, place a piece of plexi glass over the screen and it will act as a storm door to keep some of the draft from entering the rig. We found that placing a small heater inside at the top step and aiming the small electric heater AT THE DOOR stopped the drafts from coming up the steps and across the floor. It pushes the cold air from the door up towards the ceiling and helps to circulate the air in the front area of the MH. Makes a big difference in comfort.


Kathy

rockhillmanor

On the Road

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Posted: 07/17/12 01:57pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My biggest laugh I ever had about heated bays was RV'ing with a friend of mine who had just bought a big brand new diesel pusher for just as big bucks. He kept hounding me about being cheap and not buying a new one like he did.

First time we were out at a sporting event and the temps dropped below freezing his water lines froze up. He called the dealership to find out what could be wrong and the service manager said:
"put a light bulb in the bay that will keep it from freezing". So much for so called heated bays.

A brand new, 6 figure RV with the heated bay option and he had to slink over to my RV and ask if I had a 100 watt light bulb so he could go to the bathroom!

Shockingly to me, I have since read countless threads on this forum about members asking how to keep the lines from freezing and the replies from senior members all saying put a light bulb in the bay.

So IMHO, JMHO that is why when someone asks about living in a MH in the dead of winter I honestly can't answer "sure go ahead you don't have to worry about anything, your dealership said it had heated tanks and bays"!

Pogoil

Oregon Coast

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Posted: 07/17/12 02:23pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not sure about some of the information but I live on the Oregon coast and am not sure where others have stayed but the south Oregon coast, CoosBay south the weather is not at all like some have reported.

Yes it can rain but weeks on end it does not. Last winter we had more sun than rain until March arrived. Then we got 27 inches. Even with that amount we still saw sunny days in March. And many sunny days October - Feb.

If you trap moisture in your RV by not opening it up on sunny days you will create a problem. But if you air out your RV you will have no problem.

Way to many close their RVs up and do not let fresh air in and trap the moisture in. The average winter low temp. is 44 degrees on the coast and it can freeze but it is not all that common. The highs can reach into the low 60s but usually hoover around 50-55. In 8 years of living here the coldest has been about 25 degrees but not more than a few days. We camp many times in the winter months and 2 years we have camped the entire coast for 2 weeks at a time with no problems.

The winter storms are very exciting and we enjoy them.

Pogoil.

* This post was edited 07/17/12 05:40pm by Pogoil *

2inAlabama

Huntsville, AL

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Posted: 07/17/12 04:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would like to hear how you fare next spring, what your advice is for someone thinking about doing this.


Just DH & DW


N7SJN

SE Washington State

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Posted: 07/17/12 06:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This year we spent January @ 1000ft in the Oregon coast range, then moved to Astoria for Feb, Mar & April. At 1000ft we had 2ft of snow and in Astoria in a 2 day period we had 6" of rain. All in all it was much better than being in single digits as we had been the last 7 years. We plan never to spend another winter in single digits! We have a large dehumidifer and insulated drapes for the windows. BTW the propane dealers love us.

TEO

Inverness, FL, USA

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Posted: 07/17/12 07:57pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My wife and I and our three dogs are going to do the same thing............only 2000 miles further south.

Paul


Paul & Helen
2002 Winnebago Journey DL
1999 Jeep Cherokee toad
Yellow Lab, Jodie, Chocolate Lab, Coco , and Lab/Golden mix, Sandy.
FMCA 98905
http://ptempesta.blogspot.com

Pogoil

Oregon Coast

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Posted: 07/17/12 08:47pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On the coast we are close to the drain so when it rains hard it is gone shortly after.

Did I mention the winter storms are awesome?
Pogoil.

wny_pat

Western NYS

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Posted: 07/17/12 09:34pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A warmer coach. Something along the lines of a Newell. a Provest, a Monaco, a Foretravel, a Monaco, a Country Coach, a Triple E. Did I say Triple E! And I know I left out a couple like Travel Supreme.


“All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveler is unaware.”

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