RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Truck Campers: San Juan XTC, part two

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > San Juan XTC, part two

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Sponsored By:
jefe 4x4

West Slope, Northern Sierra Nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 01/21/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 11/02/10 08:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What did we do to make the rigs trail-ready? I really can't speak for Point Dog (Doug was the trail leader for the expo) or The Whaz, but there were a few adjustments.
Tire pressure was reduced. I was down to 35 lbs. front and 30 lbs. rear. Mongo traction, a nicer ride, and less jarring for the suspension. In essence, your tires become part of the suspension. I kept all the heavy stuff down low in the TC. I got some side sway, more than Doug or Waz, but not enough to pull anything apart, which I was worried about.
Disconnected rear anti-sway bar on one side only. The rr axle has more travel and much less side-to-side pulling. Adjusted tie-downs to fit the trail circumstances. When going up steeply, I would keep the fronts fairly loose and the rears fairly tight. The box did move in and out depending on how steep the grade was. When going downhill steeply, I kept the front tie-downs just snug, and the rears looser to have space for the box to slide forward. Remember the off-road mantra: resistance is futile. An important issue for extreme high altitude running is the power plant. We all had turbo diesels. You really want torque and ability to breathe way up there, and the turbo diesels were the ticket. I've done these trails with a gas engine before and they just run out of poop at elevation. The only casualty we had was Whaz'z left front tire. While pulling off the trail to let a commercial expedition rig full of paying customers to pass, he snagged a sharp rock. I plugged the gash with about 8 Safety Seal tire plugs and it actually held air for about 24 hours. Until we got to the pavement, then the tire heated up and started to puke plugs.

[image]

[image]

[image]

We dropped down into Silverton. Watched the first section of the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gage come into town. Doug's spouse is GM for the railroad. I'm just a railfan.

[image]

Doug and I went thru a very well done mining museum there while killing time. The Whaz had no spare tire now and instead of scuttling the trip, he drove down to Durango and bought a used tire for the spare. The trio then started upgrade again following Mineral Creek up toward Hurricane Pass and our next camp.

[image]

[image]

Our camp just south of Hurricane pass: Everyone found a flat spot.
[image]

[image]

Doug's Lamb Kabobs at the ready:
[image]
Chef d'occasion in prep:
[image]

Happy hour arrives with jefe's tequilla sunset;
[image]

then a little night cap around Doug's fire pit:
[image]

watch that first step.
[image]

The next day we take the fork in the road;
[image]
We traversed some wash-ins: hard rains had previously washed sand and rock across the trail: The tiltin' hiltin'.
[image]

[image]

[image]

we toured a restored mine building with these great stamps:
[image]

[image]

[image]

Some parts of the trail got pretty narrow for the super singles.
[image]

eventually winding upgrade toward Engineer Pass and our camp spot at "OH" point.
[image]

View near Engineer Pass. Pretty much downhill every direction except the peak.
[image]
Engineer Pass:
[image]

"OH" point was our last roundup. THE highest camp we had.
[image]

Tres Hermanos in front of Chez Whaz at "OH" point.
[image]

jefe doing Carne Asada on doug's wind protected tailgate
[image]

Whazoo relaxing with a jefe's tequilla sunset
[image]

at sunset near 13K feet.
[image]

[image]

[image]
Then of course sun up the next AM. We retired fairly early each night as when the sun went down, somehow it was dark. I tried to sleep at this elevation and kept waking trying to catch my breath. The air was very thin. Even though we were through the 72 hour acclimatizing stage, I could just not sleep but for a few short minutes. At 4:30 AM, I had had it and got up and took a shower. I could hear the water heater running when for the first time my CO2 alarm went off. Such a loud schreeky sound. There was no way to turn it off. The camper instruction manual said, "run away" as fast a you can and call the fire dept. Hmm? None found. After openning all the windows and doors and turning on the exhaust fan the schreek finally abated. We surmise that the propane was running very rich for the water heater burner and tripped the alarm. The breeze was also pushing the fumes into the box on that side.
[image]

enough for now. I'll wind this tome up in part three.
regards, as always, jefe


'01.5 Dodge 2500 4x4, CTD, Qcab, SB, NV5600, 241HD, 4.10's, Dana 70/TruTrac; Dana 80/ TruTrac, Spintec hub conversion, H.D. susp, 315/75R16's on 7.5" and 10" wide steel wheels, Vulcan big line, Warn M15K winch '98 Lance Lite 165s, 8' 6" X-cab, 200w Solar

Eugarps

Hagerstown, MD

Senior Member

Joined: 09/26/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/10 08:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Whoa! What a trip! Thanks for taking us along. [emoticon] The sunset pictures are really spectacular.

Bill

c.traveler2

Moreno Valley,Ca.

Senior Member

Joined: 09/04/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 11/02/10 08:30pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What a great trip Jeff, I though we had some tilting spot along the WRT.One day I'll be there with some friends.


2007 F-250 4x4 /6.0 PSD/ext cab/ 2020 Bunduvry

Lance 815/ 85 watts solar panel (sold)

Travelingman2 Photo Website
Truck Camper Trip Reports 3.0
travelingman21000 YouTube Videos
Alex and Julie's Travels Blog


deltabravo

Spokane, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 09/08/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/10 09:28pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jefe 4x4 wrote:

Doug and I went thru a very well done mining museum there while killing time.


Been there, done that. The Mining Museum has got to be one of the best museums I've ever been in. If you make it to Silverton, you HAVE to see the museum. It's near the old courthouse at the far end of town.

Didn't hit the museum this year, but I went through it last summer.

I suppose I should post a trip report of my Silverton Adventure one of these days.


2009 Silverado 3500HD Dually, D/A, CCLB 4x4 (bought new 8/30/09)
2009 Arctic Fox 811 (bought new 11/9/09)
2018 Timber Ridge 24RLS (bought pre-owned 3/12/20, sold 7/28/20)
2008 Haulmark 8.5x20 toy box trailer

Tiger4x4RV

Inland Empire, Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/14/2007

View Profile



Posted: 11/02/10 08:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OH!


2006 Tiger CX 4x4, 8.1 L gas V-8, Allison 6-speed


deltabravo

Spokane, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 09/08/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/10 09:30pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jefe 4x4 wrote:


we toured a restored mine building with these great stamps:
[image]

[image]



That looks like the Sound Democrat Mill.

whazoo

Idahome

Senior Member

Joined: 10/12/2007

View Profile



Posted: 11/02/10 09:48pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Part 2, part 2? Where's part 1?? Wait, I'll be right back

whazoo

Idahome

Senior Member

Joined: 10/12/2007

View Profile



Posted: 11/02/10 10:11pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OK, I've seen part 1 now, nice write up and I'm getting to enjoy the trip all over again. I already know what a guy can do with a pop-up, but I will say it was impressive to see a hardside do these rough trails. And there is no other person to do it other than the Hef, (American spelling for Jefe pronounced with an H. In Spanish J(H)efe means "the boss or leader") And Doug was a supreme guide with more knowledge of the area and mines than the book of the San Juans I brought with me. And lets talk about food, OMG I gained weight instead of loosing it. Lamb kabobs one night thanks to Doug and Carne Asada thanks to Jefe. It made my pre-cooked chili seem like...pre-cooked chili. It was great fellas, thanks a bunch
[image]

cm

Dillon, CO USA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/01/2002

View Profile



Posted: 11/02/10 10:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One problem that comes with high altitude is dehydration. It also effects sleeping. And drinking alcohol just helps make you more dehydrated. Drinking water constantly and start drinking water in advance of going to a high altitude is important. You might want to do some research on the effects of altitude sickness.

jmtandem

western nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 01/18/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/10 10:46pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Fantastic story and pics. Some of the places you went prove that you have more guts than me with a cabover hard side camper.


'05 Dodge Cummins 4x4 dually 3500 white quadcab auto long bed.

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > San Juan XTC, part two
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.