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 > Trip Report: Goin' Out Californee-Way, Part-2

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NRALIFR

Truck Camping Out West

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Joined: 11/27/2005

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Posted: 11/10/10 06:28am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you missed "Trip Report: Goin' Out Californee-Way, Part-1", you can find it here.

The Californee-cation (California Vacation):

We rolled into California on I-40 after leaving Lake Havasu City, and I immediately showed the Agriculture Inspection officers at the Needles station just how smart we Arkansawyers are. [emoticon]

Approaching the station (which I was aware of and expecting, BTW) I see the station itself and the signs. The station looks like a toll plaza, spanning the width of the highway. I see the plaza consists of about a half-dozen lanes, but can't really tell which of them are open yet. Getting closer I see a few semi's in the far right lane, and about the same time I notice that on the plaza roof above every lane to the left of the trucks is the word "Trucks". The "Trucks" signs sort of look like they're lit up, but maybe not.

The traffic is very light, and no cars are in any of these lanes. I still can't tell which of them might be opened. I'm looking for green lights, and I just don't see any, but we're getting closer.....and closer.........and closer. This was early in the day with the sun at our backs, so maybe the sun was washing out the lights, if there were any. I figure the traffic must be so light that they only have one lane opened, so I start heading to the right. Just as I'm passing the first of a long string of orange cones separating the far right lane from the other lanes, I also see a sign with print small enough that you can't possibly read it until you're right on top of it saying something about commercial trucks to the right and everybody else to the left.

Rats! Crappity-crap-doodle! Dagnabbit! I slammed on the brakes before we went too far down that lane, threw it into reverse and backed up. I see in my mirror that another semi is pretty far behind us and slowing, but he apparently is aware that I've just screwed up so he just stops leaving me plenty of room to finish whatever the hell it is I'm doing. I get over into the correct lane, and as I slow to a stop at the booth, the guy manning it doesn't say anything. He just looks at me with a smirky smile, and in that instant I actually read his mind. It was one word: "Idiot". All I can do is just give him a shrug, and say in a whisper that I hoped only he could hear: "It was her fault!".

He asked me where we're from, and I answer: "Arkansas". His mind says: "Figures". [emoticon]

He then asks a few questions about fresh vegetables, potted plants, and such, then sends us on our way with a spoken "Have a safe trip", and an unspoken: "Moron".

I didn't take this picture, I stole it off some other website. And........ it did NOT look like this at the time we went through, I swear! Anyone can tell from this picture that the right lane is for trucks only.

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As Homer Simpson says: "I am so smart! S-M-R-T!

Doh! [emoticon]

We pass through Ludlow, which appears to consist of a gas station on the south side of I-40 and not much else. One of our guidebooks tells us that this area was used as a training ground for Gen. Patton's tank crews in 1942 before they were sent to North Africa. Probably a good choice. I doubt tanks could do much damage to anything out here.

We pass some ancient lava beds that I believe are associated with the Pisgah Crater.

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We then come up on this, that I recognize is a huge array of mirrors. It was originally a power generation plant, but from what we read, is now used as a telescope. How about that! [emoticon]

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I-40 comes to an end in Barstow, where it's joined with I-15. We leave the interstate again though, and head off toward Mojave on Hwy-58. There's a huge aerospace complex there that turned out to be the Mojave Air and Space Port. There's a lot of interesting things going on there, like the 2004 development and launch of Spaceship One. They also have their own "boneyard" that's the final resting place for numerous large commercial airliners, including some rare vintage aircraft. I'd love to spend a day exploring that place.

Going through the Tehachapi Pass, it appears they grow wind generators as a crop. There are around 5000 of these in this area alone, making it one of the largest in the US. I've seen some big wind farms before, but this is amazing.

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Another engineering marvel in the area is the Tehachapi Loop. A single-track section of rail line that was built over 130 years ago, and is an ingenious solution to the challenge of a train negotiating the nearly 80 foot change in elevation East of the current town of Keen. As you can see in the aerial photo below, the tracks loop around a hill and cross over themselves, gaining (or losing) 77 feet of elevation in the process. Trains more than 4,000 feet long circle over themselves, a rare phenomenon that brings rail fans from all over the world to the Loop. The track is used daily by dozens of trains, although there were none to photograph when we went through. The weather once again was rainy and overcast for us, so there was little inclination to stop and wait for one.

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I think it was in this area that the mountains started taking on an almost surreal look to me, and the rain was causing the air to be filled with the fragrance of vegetation that had not been wet in quite some time. I'm not sure what the source of the smell was, or if it even was a single source, but the air was heavy with it. It was a pleasant aroma, and I remember thinking "If they would bottle this, I'd buy some".


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At this point we turned off Hwy-58 to take the infamous "Caliente to Bodfish Road". It was kind of funny how we got on there, and how the trip went. I posted that part of the trip in a previous thread, so I won't repeat it all here.

Leaving Bodfish, we continued on around Lake Isabella on Hwy-155 and drove past the campground that we were intending to stay at last night if our progress hadn't been slowed to a crawl on the Caliente road. We then find our way to Mountain Hiway 99, which follows the Kern River for several miles through the Sequoia National Forest. The road is very scenic, and the river is just beautiful.

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The traffic was so light that we got out and walked down the river a bit, and just left the truck idling beside the road. I don't think another vehicle went by the whole time.

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While rolling along this road, every so often I was seeing some pretty big pine cones lying on the road. I intentionally avoided running over a few of them, but I eventually hit one just because I didn't feel like making the sudden move I would have had to make in order to avoid it. Just before my tire hit it I was thinking "No big deal, it's just a pine cone". Then....WHUMP-WHUMP! Geez! It actually bounced me up in the seat, and it felt like I just ran over an Armadillo back in Arkansas! I couldn't believe how hard that thing was! Turns out, these are the cones of the Coulter Pine, and are the biggest pine cones in the world. They can weigh 10 pounds or more, and old time loggers called them "widow makers" because they could kill you if they fell on your head.

This is just a baby one I'm holding.

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I'm not sure what this stuff is, but it was blooming alongside the roads. The stems looked dead, but there were yellow flowers popping out of them.

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We eventually find our way to Hwy-190 heading toward Springville, and while we could have spent days meandering around on these mountain roads, we finally decide that if we were ever going to get to Yosemite, we better get on a faster route. Here it was Thursday already, our sixth day on the road. Time's-a-wastin'!

We stop for lunch at a parking area next to the Lake Success Dam and discuss which route to take. We decide to stay on Hwy-190 over to 99, and head directly to Fresno. We then get on Hwy-41 and are in the Wawona campground by dinner time.

There were several other campers in the A-Loop, and the C-Loop was closed, but the B-Loop just had a handful in it. Probably because of the sign that said "No RV's in the B-Loop, there isn't enough room to turn around". I figured they must be talking about those trailer draggers, because everyone knows that truck campers aren't RV's, right? TC's are cargo! So I go on in and find a nice spot next to the river, and pay for the next three nights. I figured Friday night and Saturday night were going to be tough (if not impossible) to find any other camping sites in Yosemite Valley, and wasn't wanting to waste time trying to find one, so we at least had a spot to come back to each night even if it was a bit of a drive. Actually, there were several other RV's (including some pretty long trailers) in the B-Loop by Friday night, and the campground as a whole looked like it was full. The Ranger I talked to the next morning said the B-Loop would be closing on Monday.

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I have the front right-hand jack down lifting the camper slightly, and the air-bag on the left side is deflated, making it look a little off-kilter compared to the truck.

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The Wawona road was in the middle of being repaved, so there were some delays where we had to stop and wait for traffic to be given the all clear to go in our direction, and some unpaved stretches where you had to slow down, but I don't think we had more than a hour delay total the whole time we were there. The campground had obviously had some heavy rain recently, as there were deep ruts in the slopes, piles of rocks in the roads, and the campsite across the road from us had about 3-4 inches of standing water in it. But it still had a trailer in it Friday night, though. I was just glad I wasn't parked in a flooded site.

The South Fork of the Merced River was just below our site, and gave us a pleasant view. The river’s full name is El Río de Nuestra Señora de la Merced (“The River of Our Lady of Mercy”).

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A tree next to the river had grown around these rocks, and made it look like it was protecting a clutch of eggs.

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I moved this rock closer to the camper so I could set my grill on it and the hose could reach my LP tanks. [emoticon] Actually, it's a good thing that rock was there, otherwise I wouldn't have been able to set my grill on the ground due to the way it dropped off so steeply on that side. I need to get a little 5 lb. refillable tank, using the TC's LP tanks isn't quite as convenient as I thought it would be when I bought the long hose.

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We decided to spend Friday morning hiking the trails and viewing the giant Sequoia's in the Mariposa Grove, since it was closest to the Wawona campground. We drove over to the Wawona Store and left the truck there, and then took the free shuttle to the grove. Taking the shuttle was a smart move, as there was absolutely no place to park when we got to the grove parking lot. Good thing the shuttles have their own reserved spots.

This is the base of one of the giants that fell in 1873.

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The giant trees of the Mariposa Grove will make you feel rather small and insignificant. The hiking trails that wind you through the 500 or so Sequoias are only about "Moderately Strenuous". The trees are majestic and beautiful, and difficult for me to photograph in their entirety. I mostly ended up with a lot of pictures of the trunks.

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This is the Bachelor and Three Graces, the trunks end just above the top of the picture. They were cut years ago when the snow was piled high around them............... Just kidding! [emoticon]

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At approximately 2700 years old, the Grizzly Giant is one of the oldest trees in the grove. It has limbs with larger diameters than some full grown trees.

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One of the few remaining "tunneled" trees from years past.

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Most of the trees bear the scars of past fires. The bark of the Sequoias is moist and spongy, which helps them survive the fires. This tree is known as the "Faithful Couple"..........

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For obvious reasons. The two trees have been fused together for many years. Sure hope they like each other.

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This is one of the open-air trams that will take you on a ride through the grove........for a small fee. We chose to walk.

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The base of this tree had been hollowed out by fire to the extent you could walk inside it. It smelled like a chimney inside.

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A portion of a trail in the grove.

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This one's called the "Clothespin Tree".

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The inside of the Mariposa Grove Museum.

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One of the fallen "Tunnel Trees" that was brought down by a heavy snow load. A sad sight to be sure, but it's collapse brought world-wide attention to the grove and the importance of preserving the remaining stands of giant Sequoias and Coastal Redwoods. Its collapse is seen as a turning point in the preservation program in National Parks in the United States. So grave was the shock of the tree's demise that the result was a greater awareness of the sensitivity of ecosystems, even for a living thing as massive as the Giant Sequoias.

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We hiked up to Wawona Point, an area that looks like it was once accessible by vehicle but doesn't appear to get many visitors today. The road is in poor shape, and is best travelled on foot.

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There's quite a view from up here. I took this view of the valley, with the meadow centered and a barely visible road on the right using my camera's "normal" setting.......

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Then I decided to play with it's Zoom feature. This is the meadow at the highest zoom setting. I had the camera steadied on the rock wall......

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And this is zoomed in on a portion of the road. You can just make out a couple of cars.

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Heading back down.

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The Mule Deer didn't seem to mind being photographed.

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Another look straight up.

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Friday evening, we had enough time to drive up to Glacier Point. The road had been closed just a few days before we got to Yosemite, but it was open now. It was getting very close to sunset though, so we had to drive up there as "expeditiously" as possible. We got there about an hour before sunset, and the shadows were getting long.

Looking across the valley you see Half Dome on the right, North Dome on the left in the foreground with the Royal Arches just below,

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The Merced River enters Yosemite Valley by flowing over Nevada Falls and Vernal Falls, with Liberty Cap on the left.

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The view of Half Dome from this perspective gives it an interesting profile.

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Looking over the edge, you see the valley floor 3200 feet below. That my friends, is a long way down!

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Glacier Point was also the spot where in years past:

"At 9:00 each evening in Camp Curry, the crowd which had gathered for the nightly campfire program, would fall silent. A man would call out to the top of Glacier Point "Let the Fire Fall!", and a faint reply could be heard from the top of the mountain. Then a great bonfire of red fir bark would be pushed evenly over the edge of the cliff, appearing to the onlookers below as a glowing waterfall of sparks and fire. The spectacle was the Yosemite Firefall, a nightly tradition in Yosemite National Park for some 88 years."

Ahhh.....The things we used to do. Sadly, I never got to experience it. I feel like I've missed something.

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Saturday was our day to spend in Yosemite Valley. The weather was perfect, so we head out from the Wawona campground right after breakfast. Yosemite Valley is long and flat, and an excellent place to ride our bikes. The roads in the valley are all bike-friendly as well, with bike lanes to the side.

The view from the end of the tunnel entering Yosemite Valley of Bridal Veil Falls.

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Our first view of the valley.

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Yosemite Falls is just a trickle this time of year.

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North Dome viewed from the Valley floor where we parked.

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A look back in the opposite direction.

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Cathedral Rock.

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The Merced River.

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We parked our bikes and walked up to Mirror Lake. According to the guide books, and signs along the way, there used to be a lot more going on at this lake in the old days. Sand was dredged from it every year to spread on the roads in the park during the winter. Ice was cut from its surface in the winter to provide cold food storage in the summer. there was a dance pavilion and a boat dock. Today, for better or worse it's just as you see.

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Mirror Lake, reflecting Mount Watkins

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We bicycle back into the valley, stopping occasionally to enjoy the scenery.

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She can't resist taking pictures of the deer while biking across Ahwahnee Meadow.

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As we biked past a row of cabins, I noticed something tucked up in the gable of the porch roof on one. If you've ever visited the Ahwahnee Meadow web-cam site that's pointed at Half Dome, this is where it's mounted.

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The view of Glacier Point from Ahwahnee Meadow.

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We biked past the Ahwanee Hotel, and decided to stop and take a look. I'd like to come back here with some of our family members who don't RV and spend a few nights here. Here's a look at the backside of the hotel. The parts of the hotel that look like real wood timbers are actually concrete.

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Somebody was getting married while we were there. Poor saps.............they don't know what they're in for. She sure was walking slow, too. I bet she was having second thoughts.

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Impressive dining room view.

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We bicycled around the valley until nearly sunset, and got this beautiful view of El Capitan.

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We returned to our campsite after dark. I know our empty site was being coveted by many anxious campers during the day, but we left ample evidence that the site was occupied and we would return. We made some dinner by the light of the LED lamps I installed in the camper before we left. These are working out pretty well. They provide plenty of light where it's needed, and the incandescent and florescent lamps are still available for when we have hookups.

On Sunday, we pulled out of the Wawona Campground for the last time to spend the day driving the Tioga Road. To get to the Tioga Road, we have to drive back to the entrance of Yosemite Valley on the Wawona Road, go through the tunnel one last time, and then turn onto the Big Oak Flat Road heading toward the Crane Flat Campground.

We stopped just before the tunnel to enjoy the view.

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Looking across at the Big Oak Flat Road and the two tunnels we'll soon be going through.

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Our last look at Bridal Veil Falls.

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Stopping at one of the overlooks along the Tioga Road, we get a good view of the backside of Half Dome.

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Zooming in. In person, I thought I could see the cables used by the hikers climbing up Half Dome. Now I'm not so sure.

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The cat is anxiously searching for the "right spot".

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We stop beside Tenaya Lake for lunch. The water was crystal clear in this high elevation lake.

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We sat on a log on the shore and ate our lunch.

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Tuolumne (too-AH-lum-ee ) Meadow. Do you have to stay on the paths? Are there "Path Police"?

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This big rock is just begging to be clumbed.

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Still a little snow left in the shadows.

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Lots of snow left up there!

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And finally....Tioga Lake. Another ten miles or so, and we leave Yosemite National Park behind. This was our first visit to the park, and hopefully not our last.

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Just outside the park is Mono Lake, an alkaline and hyper-saline lake that has some interesting geology and history. The lake is known for it's exposed tufa towers along it's South shore. The lake is also one of the oldest lakes in North America, and it has no natural water out-flow except for evaporation. Water diversion over the last 100 years from it's tributaries to the city of Los Angeles has caused it's level to drop dramatically, exposing the Tufa structures that formed underwater. The tufa, or calcium carbonate spires and knobs, was formed as fresh water springs percolated up through the bottom of the lake and interacted with the alkaline lake water.

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Mono Lake attracts a lot of migratory waterfowl, who feed and nest around it. A lawsuit about 30 years ago forced the state to reduce the water diversions from the lake, and the water level is slowly rising today.

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The birds who visit the lake feed off of a native brine shrimp unique to Mono Lake, and alkali flies that are abundant along the shores. Swarms of flies live and breed in the shallow waters, and the pupae were also a source of food for the indigenous Paiute Indians.

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"Taste like nutty, buttery rice......." Yeah right. I think I'll stick to Uncle Ben's.

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After leaving Mono Lake, we continued South on Hwy-395 toward Bishop. I remember passing a turn off for the "June Lake Loop", and wondered what that was. I wish I'd gotten a picture of the next sign, but it was one of those "Adopt a Highway" signs that announced that litter on this section of the highway was being picked up by "One of those June Lake Liberals". I had to chuckle at that. Maybe I should have taken that road after all. I kind of wanted to learn what a "June Lake Liberal" looked like.

The next leg of our trip was going to take us across Death Valley, the largest National Park in the US. After several days of trouble free driving in Yosemite, on the next uphill grade I see the "Fuel Filter" light on the dash has come on again. Dagnabbit! This is starting to torque me off. I'm beginning to wonder if the sensor that turns the light on is faulty. I've had to replace that sensor once in the past, because it was leaking fuel through it. For an engine that's supposedly starving for fuel, it's running amazingly well.

Just before we get to Bishop, there's a long down-hill grade that must be 5-6 miles long. When we get to the bottom, I find a place to pull off where I get out my tools and tear into the fuel filter canister. I'm parked on gravel this time, so I drain the canister and then pull the filter. Again it doesn't look dirty, but I have my spare filter ready to put in. I decide to remove the standpipe and fuel heater from the bottom of the canister since I have the filter out. Once the heater is out, I can see that there's what looks like rusty sand in the bottom of the canister. Hmmm.......I either picked up some dirty fuel , or one of my tanks is rusting. I've never seen any rust whatsoever in the canister before though, so I don't really think my tanks are the source. I clean it out as best I can with paper towels, and rinse it out with the only thing I had available.....Coleman fuel.

I knew there were also a couple of screens in the fuel pressure regulator on the side of the canister, so I pulled it off, took it into the camper and cleaned it out in the shower. The screens didn't really look bad though. I put it all back together, but didn't have anything handy to prime the filter canister with. I wished I had run some fuel out the bleed valve into a container before I took this apart, but too late for that. I tell DW I'm going to need her to crank the engine for me, and I get ready to bleed the air out if needed. Hopefully that new faster cranking starter will help this process a little. I leave the fuel canister drain valve open as she cranks the engine to flush any remaining crud out, and it starts normally. I tell her just let it idle, and I close the drain valve. It never even hiccups. Dang, this sure isn't like that old 6.9 liter Diesel I used to have.

Instead of continuing into Bishop, I decide to head back up that grade we just came down. I'm determined to find out whether the engine is really starving for fuel or not. I climb the grade the same way I normally do, driving the truck primarily off the exhaust temp gauge. I push up the hill maintaining the speed limit as long as I can without letting the EGT get too high. The "Fuel Filter" light comes on again, but the engine is still running normally so I keep going until the EGT guage says I need to shift down and get the RPM's up. The "Fuel Filter" light is still on when I down shift, but after the shift I notice the engine is losing power. That's enough to convince me that there really is a fuel delivery problem, so I back off the throttle and fortunately there's a cross-over lane to the down hill side coming up on my left. I turn around and head back downhill, and ask the navigator to start looking for someplace to spend the night in Bishop, and see if there's a Ford dealership there.

Call me "overly cautious", but there's just something about the possibility of breaking down in [emoticon] Death Valley [emoticon] that made me want to avoid that if at all possible. After all, they didn't name it "The Cool Pleasant Valley of Puppies, Kittens, and Chocolate", did they?

We ended up staying at Brown's Town Campground, which only had a no-hookups site available. Oh well, we just spent the last three nights with no hookups, what's one more? Unlike the Wawona Campground though, Browns Town had a "No generators anytime" rule. Whatever. We'll be out of here early anyway.

We were at the Eastern Sierra Motors Ford dealer when they opened Monday morning. The young service adviser who was on duty that morning listened as I described what was happening, and then asked one of the service tech's who was in the office "Did the '95 Powerstrokes have a "Fuel Filter" light on the dash?" He just looked back at him, so I answered for him: "Yes". We then went out to the truck and I showed him the spot on the dash, and used a flashlight to show him that it wasn't the "Water in Fuel" light that was coming on.

I took the camper off the truck and set it in an open field next to the dealership so we'd have a comfortable place to hang out besides their waiting room, got the generator out and set DW up so she could get some work done. We were going to have to stop somewhere today so she could get on a conference call anyway, so this was working out in our favor. I checked on the truck after an hour or so, and the service tech said the fuel pressure was low at idle, and got lower under load. He said I needed a new fuel pump, which they had in stock, but they didn't have a couple of copper washers that get replaced when the pump is replaced. It sounded like we were going to have to stay another night, maybe two, before they could be delivered. And, the service tech mentioned that he was off tomorrow as well. Rats! He was the most experienced mechanic at the dealership, and I was really wanting him to finish the job up.

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I went back to the camper and started searching for another source for the washers. Knowing the Powerstroke Diesel is essentially the same engine as the Navistar DT444, and shares the same fuel pump, I checked to see if there was a Navistar dealer in town. No luck, but there was an independent Diesel service shop that worked on multiple brands. The DT444 engine is used in a lot of service and delivery trucks, so I was hoping they stocked a few parts for them. Sure enough, they had them. They are only about $2.50 each, but it's always the small stuff that holds you up.

After the DW's conference call is over, we walk a few blocks into town and have lunch at Erick Schat's Bakkery. This place makes all kinds of great stuff! Pies, cakes, rolls, bread, cookies, sticky buns, you name it. We brought home several treats, including a round of their world famous "Sheepherder Bread". It's obviously a very successful business. People were lined up at every counter. We also had lunch there which was a delicious ham and cheese sandwich, on sheepherder bread of course.

We head back to the Ford dealership, and find that the service tech is just finishing up. He takes the truck for a test drive and when he gets back tells me that the fuel pressure is back up where it should be. I pay the bill, and load the camper back on the truck.

We leave town and head towards Death Valley, happy that we made it through this experience without too much of a delay, and relieved that this problem is finally behind us.
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Or was it? (This would be an ideal time for that piercing “eee-eee-eee” music from the shower scene in "Psycho")

Stay tuned for Part-3 "The Trip Home"

Trip Report: Goin' Out Californee-Way, Part-3 can be found here.


[emoticon][emoticon]

* This post was edited 12/12/10 05:22pm by NRALIFR *


2001 Lance 1121 on a 2016 F450


silversand

Montreal

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Joined: 09/12/2004

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Posted: 11/10/10 06:54am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wow!

This could be turned into a travel narrative, and published in book format.

Tremendous work, and many thanks!

Cheers,
Silver-

*I post trip reports about once or twice every 15-days in a lump-edit now; so not to panic if you don't see yours immediately


Silver
2004 Chevy Silverado 2500HD 4x4 6.0L Ext/LB Tow Package 4L80E Michelin AT2s| Outfitter Caribou

BradW

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Posted: 11/10/10 06:56am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cool photos; thanks for posting. We went there back in the 80's, but we didn't have near enough time to see everything. I think I saw more of the place via your photos than I did in person. [emoticon]

Brad

* This post was edited 11/10/10 07:08am by BradW *


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DianneOK

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Posted: 11/10/10 07:05am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

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Camping, nature's way to feed the mosquitoes


Clarryhill

Midcoast Maine

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Posted: 11/10/10 08:02am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Once again, absolutely fantastic pics, as well as narrative. Loved it!! Thanks much for sharing. Really wakes up the old "travel bug"...


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weymard

NORMANDY

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Posted: 11/10/10 10:13am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Absolutely beautiful landscapes, with your interesting narrative.
Thanks


FORD F250 LARIAT 4X4 DIESEL 2008
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France, Normandy

Tiger4x4RV

Inland Empire, Southern California

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Posted: 11/10/10 04:08pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"The Cool Pleasant Valley of Puppies, Kittens, and Chocolate"? Love it!

Wonderful photos. thanks for sharing. I'm glad you enjoyed your trip to this small portion of our glorious state.


2006 Tiger CX 4x4, 8.1 L gas V-8, Allison 6-speed


sirdrakejr

Las Vegas, Nevada

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Posted: 11/10/10 04:42pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Great pictures. I had to do some telco work at Tivy Valley and Sanger just down the road and never did find time to get to the park. Now I am not sure I ever will. Your pics sure makes me want to get there.
Frank


2011 Palomino Maverick 1000SLLB on a 2004 Dodge Quadcab CTD Ram3500 SRW long bed equipped with Timbren springs, Stable Load bump stops, Rickson 19.5" wheels/"G" range tires and a Helwig "Big Wig" rear anti sway bar.


nycsteve

NY

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Posted: 11/10/10 10:41am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks.
EEE,EEE,EEE [emoticon]





bigfootford

Fair Oaks, California

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Posted: 11/10/10 10:40am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We never get tired of exploring the 395 corridor and both the western and eastern slopes of the sierras!!!
Great write up.

Jim.


2000 2500 9.6 Bigfoot,94 F250, Vision 19.5, Mich 245/70XDS2's, Bilstein shocks, air bags/pump, EU2000, PD 9260,Lifeline 100ah, 200W. solar, Morningstar Sunsaver 15A/ display panel, Trimetric, Delorme/laptop, Holux gps rec,led lights, Wave-3 heat.

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