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 > Your search for posts made by '01tundra' found 13 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Does closing most A/C vents create back-pressure?

If you close too many vents you restrict airflow across the evaporator coil. If you restrict air flow across the evaporator coil the evaporator coil will start to freeze up. If you freeze up your evaporator coil you run the risk of slugging the compressor with liquid refrigerant because it doesn't have a chance to flash to a gas in the evaporator. If you slug the compressor you run the risk of it failing. Now your too high of airflow problem is fixed because you no longer have an operating AC unit.
01tundra 07/22/21 07:27am Tech Issues
RE: Fog lights on w/ High Beams, New GM trucks

But...on this thread, these functional beam patterns are not of interest...just cool factor...AKA looks Nice assumption......:R
01tundra 03/07/21 09:16am Tow Vehicles
RE: Fog lights on w/ High Beams, New GM trucks

I question how full manual control of the fogs is possible with the Boostauto or DIY diode mod. IIRC, Boostauto doesn't claim the ability to turn off the fogs when high beams are activated and it doesn't make sense that it would be possible. Last 2 trucks I did, the fogs were automaticlaly on with the high beams. Just like this one. Regardless, if you have your brights on, it's for more light and the more the better! I haven't really given it much thought, but I can confirm that the Boostauto kit does indeed allow you to turn the fogs on/off with high beams on via the factory fog light switch.
01tundra 03/06/21 08:50am Tow Vehicles
RE: Fog lights on w/ High Beams, New GM trucks

I installed this kit on our 2017 GMC 2500HD, works great. It installs on one of the plugs inside the cab. Allows you to use the fog lights on either low or high beam, fog light switch still functions as designed. So the fog lights only come on if you choose to hit the factory switch. All this kit does is prevents the fog lights from being automatically switched off when switching from low to high beam "if" you have the fog lights turned on. After install your lights will function as follows: Low Beams Only- Only Low Beams will be on Fog Lights Only- Only Fog Lights will be on Low Beams & Fogs- Only Low Beams & Fogs will be on High Beams- Low Beams, Fog Lights, & High Beams will all be on (GM by default normally turns off the fogs when in high beam, but this kit solves that) Running the fog lights with high beam in rural areas such as ours really helps....and before anyone wants to lecture me on how it's illegal because you could blind oncoming vehicles, I'm not of of the jacka$$e$ who approaches oncoming vehicles with my high beams on so it's a non-issue. https://boostautoparts.com/products/6hi
01tundra 03/05/21 07:47am Tow Vehicles
RE: 60a DC-to-DC Charger Powered by 220a Alternator

Our 12/12-18 Victron DC-DC charger outputs around 25A and the draw on the truck side is pushing 30A. I ran a dedicated 4 AWG circuit since it's approximately 40 ft in length and I was afraid that there could be times when the alternator output dropped such that the input voltage would be below the minimum allowable with the factory 12 AWG charge wire. Victron recommends a minimum of 16 sqmm wire cross sectional area (approx. 5 AWG) for a 32 ft circuit length at 12V. I used Anderson connectors for between the truck and trailer. https://i.imgur.com/ml8m1FR.jpg https://i.imgur.com/UgJE7fM.jpg https://i.imgur.com/Hu70ssF.jpg https://i.imgur.com/JMIFdnW.jpg
01tundra 01/25/21 10:45am Tech Issues
RE: Tow vehicle charging RV batteries

I ran a dedicated 4AWG charge circuit from one of our truck batteries back to a 150A Anderson plug mounted on the hitch. Used a Blue Sea 50A battery post fuse on the truck. Installed a 4AWG pigtail in the trailer that powers a Victron 12/12-18 DC-DC charger. We now get 25A charge current to our trailer batteries. https://i.imgur.com/ml8m1FR.jpg https://i.imgur.com/UgJE7fM.jpg https://i.imgur.com/Hu70ssF.jpg https://i.imgur.com/JMIFdnW.jpg https://i.imgur.com/nTSx9eo.png https://i.imgur.com/xOTYqrf.png
01tundra 12/08/20 07:43am Travel Trailers
RE: Lithium Batteries

I think the issue is over voltage to the LI battery bank, not protection of the alternator. LI batteries have been known to burn up some alternators due to the high charging demand, they've also been known to draw down tow vehicle batteries due to the higher resting voltage of LiFePO4 vs LA, if left hooked up with the engine off with a constant hot charge wire. There is no overvoltage worries due to the voltage drop on inadequate factory wiring for charging purposes. If you upgraded you wiring such that you could get higher than 14.6V at the batteries then the BMS would kick in on high voltage. For MY application the DC charger is there to actually provide enough amps to charge the batteries while running and isolation from the TV when the engine is off. DC chargers have many benefits and one is absolutely protecting the alternator - https://www.victronenergy.com/blog/2019/10/07/careful-alternator-charging-lithium/
01tundra 09/22/20 09:03am Tech Issues
RE: Lithium Batteries

I'm running a Victron Orion 12/12-18 DC-DC charger with a dedicated 4AWG charging circuit from the truck. I get 25A out of it at peak charging and don't have to worry about the truck's alternator voltage fluctuation or it being harmed. The charger has settings that allow it to sense alternator current to automatically start/stop to prevent the trailer LiFePO4 batteries from drawing down the truck lead acid batteries when the engine is off. https://i.imgur.com/ml8m1FR.jpg https://i.imgur.com/UgJE7fM.jpg https://i.imgur.com/Hu70ssF.jpg https://i.imgur.com/JMIFdnW.jpg https://i.imgur.com/xOTYqrf.png
01tundra 09/22/20 06:14am Tech Issues
RE: Lithium Batteries

And just for the sake of wondering.... for temps that cold, could some sort of heat pad, blanket or bag not be used to keep the lith's warm enough to function properly? (I'm picturing a Domino's pizza delivery electric warmer bag) Or, perhaps, would moving your batt's inside your camper living space. Obviously if you go with the SiO2, your good to go. But for those with Lith's already, are there options if they are occasionally stuck in temps that cold? Or mount them inside the trailer instead of outside, which eliminates the low temp operation issue and increases security. Or buy one of the brands that has internal heaters or use the heating pads offered if you'd prefer to keep them outside. The entire temperature argument is a non-issue in my opinion.
01tundra 09/14/20 09:52am Tech Issues
RE: Lithium Batteries

What is the advantage to them over Lithium? Is it just cost? Do they provide as much power? As far as power goes 100 amp-hours is 100 amp-hours. However SiO2 may do larger discharge rates than LI. LI appear to be limited to about 1 C. Similar to LI in that partial charging is just fine--though best practise is to do a full charge on a monthly basis. advantages 1. can be used and charged at -40 2. can be run stone bone dead 620 times 3. can do 50% discharge 2800 times 4. no need to stop charging at 90% which LI prefer (for storage) 5. can do 80% discharge 1500 times disadvantages: 1. heavier and larger foot print than Li 2. charge rate 4/c however if one has 300 amp-hours that hardly matters as convert size may not be able to get to 75 amps--without upgrading. In addition to the silicon dioxide battery characteristics that Don lists above, they have one more advantage over lithium batteries that is important to me: Lithium RV batteries hold their output voltage "high" right to the end before recharging ... their output voltage does not taper off a bit as they discharge .... unlike what the output voltage of lead acid batteries and that of silicon dioxide batteries does. To me the output not tapering off - like lithiums do - as they discharge IS NOT preferred ... it's a "disadvantage". It's nice to know when you're getting near the point where recharging is necessary by merely periodically checking the voltage on your RV's battery powered circuit - when that voltage reads around 12 volts, recharge them. As I understand it, silicon dioxide RV batteries act about the same way ... making it very simple to know about when to recharge them. To get around this when switching to lithium RV batteries - in addition to their higher cost - you must spend even more money on what is technically known as an "integrating ammeter". This is a battery monitor that tracks how many amps are removed from the battery bank over time - thus showing how many amp hours have been used out of the battery bank. To me, the above is just another gadget to buy in addition to the high lithium battery initial cost. Why have to purchase an amp hour consumption monitor - when silicon dioxide RV batteries have just about the same performance characteristics (they weigh more than lithium, but they recharge and operate at lower temperatures than lithium) as lithium RV batteries. P.S. For example, I have a lot of lithium battery powered flashlights, remotes, and small tools ... AND IT'S VERY IRRITATING when they surprise you by suddenly dying with very little get-dim/slow-down type discharged warnings. Having a battery monitor "gadget" is an accurate way to monitor the SOC of any type of battery chemistry, including lead acid. Measuring with a volt meter is often misleading and very inaccurate, unless you let the battery sit for a hours at rest. But if you're really stuck on using this inaccurate method, the same can be done with LiFePO4 batteries.....they don't all of the sudden die as you describe. They discharge and have a voltage vs SOC curve just like any other battery. LiFePO4 batteries are a complete different chemistry from Li batteries in flashlights and such. How much personal experience do you have with LiFePO4 batteries in an RV? An integrating ammeter type battery monitor for an LiFePO4 based RV system can be an expensive kindof toy, like so many things that we think we need nowadays. These type ammeters need to be calibrated relative to the actual battery(ies) that you're expecting it to monitor SOC accurately, and they should be recalibrated every once in a while to maintain their SOC accuracy as the capacity of the battery bank declines over time. Lithium iron phosphate based RV/vehicle batteries are advertised to taper their output voltage less obviously than lead acid batteries -> and my lithium ion based small household batteries act that same way relative to the small amount that their output voltage tapers as they discharge and die on me. I know because I measure my lithium ion AA/AAA batteries with a four-place voltmeter. If one believes the performance curves published for LiFePO4 RV batteries, then my point was that this can be a very irritating characteristic because to know SOC one should add a special monitor to one's RV equipment in order to use LiFePO4 batteries in it. To me, it's just another thing to buy, install, and mess with. Regarding my "zero experience" with LiFePO4 RV batteries ... experience is not the only way for one to know all they need to about something. Sometimes all the necessary knowledge can be gained a lot less expensively through what others report on regarding their experimentation and experience. If my current bank of deep cycle Group 31 AGM RV batteries dies before I do, I'll seriously consider several factors before jumping on the hottest RV battery bandwagon. My rig currently has gobs of excess CCCC - so at this point in time based on published specifications only - the new silicon dioxide batteries in drop-in RV sizes read like they have real promise. Our LiFePO4 batteries start at 13.4V @ 100% SOC and are at 12.9V @ 20% SOC (maximum safe discharge floor) under no load. Lead acid is 12.6V @ 100% SOC and 12.2V @ 50% SOC (maximum safe discharge floor)under no load. That's a 0.50V spread for LiFePO4 and 0.40V spread for lead acid. You don't have to have a battery monitor for either chemistry, but if you dry camp a lot and like to really know where your SOC is then you should have one. A Victron BMV-712 monitors either chemistry. Same goes for zero calibration, no difference in requirements. I've had both and I'm stating facts that I've personally measured. I have no hands-on experience with silicon dioxide batteries, so I can't speak to those. For me, the weight savings, quickness of recharging, usable depth of discharge, warranty and customer service provided are all well worth the investment. https://i.imgur.com/qxQRUK1.jpg
01tundra 09/08/20 01:52pm Tech Issues
RE: Lithium Batteries

Some of the replies in this thread just like other lithium battery threads are from folks that haven't used LFP but have tons of experience from reading but no hands on. :( But they have phones, flashlights, tools that have a "lithium " chemistry so it must be the same. __________________ 12v 500ah (5,120Wh usable) , 20 cells_ 4s5p (GBS LFMP battery system). 8 CTI 160 watt panels (1,280 watts) 2s4p. Panels mounted flat on the roof. Magnum PT100 controller, Magnum 3012 hybrid inverter, ME-ARC 50. Installed 4/2016 been on 24/7/365 Yep, there's misinformation all over the forums from people who have no direct knowledge of what they are stating assumptions about.....
01tundra 09/08/20 10:54am Tech Issues
RE: Lithium Batteries

What is the advantage to them over Lithium? Is it just cost? Do they provide as much power? As far as power goes 100 amp-hours is 100 amp-hours. However SiO2 may do larger discharge rates than LI. LI appear to be limited to about 1 C. Similar to LI in that partial charging is just fine--though best practise is to do a full charge on a monthly basis. advantages 1. can be used and charged at -40 2. can be run stone bone dead 620 times 3. can do 50% discharge 2800 times 4. no need to stop charging at 90% which LI prefer (for storage) 5. can do 80% discharge 1500 times disadvantages: 1. heavier and larger foot print than Li 2. charge rate 4/c however if one has 300 amp-hours that hardly matters as convert size may not be able to get to 75 amps--without upgrading. In addition to the silicon dioxide battery characteristics that Don lists above, they have one more advantage over lithium batteries that is important to me: Lithium RV batteries hold their output voltage "high" right to the end before recharging ... their output voltage does not taper off a bit as they discharge .... unlike what the output voltage of lead acid batteries and that of silicon dioxide batteries does. To me the output not tapering off - like lithiums do - as they discharge IS NOT preferred ... it's a "disadvantage". It's nice to know when you're getting near the point where recharging is necessary by merely periodically checking the voltage on your RV's battery powered circuit - when that voltage reads around 12 volts, recharge them. As I understand it, silicon dioxide RV batteries act about the same way ... making it very simple to know about when to recharge them. To get around this when switching to lithium RV batteries - in addition to their higher cost - you must spend even more money on what is technically known as an "integrating ammeter". This is a battery monitor that tracks how many amps are removed from the battery bank over time - thus showing how many amp hours have been used out of the battery bank. To me, the above is just another gadget to buy in addition to the high lithium battery initial cost. Why have to purchase an amp hour consumption monitor - when silicon dioxide RV batteries have just about the same performance characteristics (they weigh more than lithium, but they recharge and operate at lower temperatures than lithium) as lithium RV batteries. P.S. For example, I have a lot of lithium battery powered flashlights, remotes, and small tools ... AND IT'S VERY IRRITATING when they surprise you by suddenly dying with very little get-dim/slow-down type discharged warnings. Having a battery monitor "gadget" is an accurate way to monitor the SOC of any type of battery chemistry, including lead acid. Measuring with a volt meter is often misleading and very inaccurate, unless you let the battery sit for a hours at rest. But if you're really stuck on using this inaccurate method, the same can be done with LiFePO4 batteries.....they don't all of the sudden die as you describe. They discharge and have a voltage vs SOC curve just like any other battery. LiFePO4 batteries are a complete different chemistry from Li batteries in flashlights and such. How much personal experience do you have with LiFePO4 batteries in an RV?
01tundra 09/08/20 07:45am Tech Issues
RE: Nashville

Stay outside and get a ride into town But if you're talking about in the near future you may want to check the current situation.....since most everything downtown is closed or closes early there's not going to be much activity downtown.
01tundra 08/05/20 07:34am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
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