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 > Your search for posts made by 'BCSnob' found 500 matches.

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RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Every car we have owned has been kept beyond 200,000miles. Our current low mileage car in my 1966 mustang at 107,000 As someone who has done the analysis in the emissions due to manufacturing, I ask you why you’re not keeping vehicles longer to minimize you impacts on Mother Earth? Or are you simply ignoring the emissions due to manufacturing when changing ices and only looking at the tailpipe emissions?
BCSnob 05/10/21 12:22pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Using my wife as real world example, if I bought her the BEV XC40 (she needs a suv with 4 wheel drive capabilities to live in the rural parts of Oregon) and she only drove a 3-4k miles a year, it would take almost 8 years (plus a $20k premium) to breakeven. That makes no sense. Are you now saying the breakeven point is only 24,000-32,000 miles?
BCSnob 05/10/21 12:16pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

How would the lifecycle data from Volvo compare to the CTG data if the definitions of lifecycle were the same total distance traveled? Do you thing the Volvo EV would look better than the Volvo ICE if the lifecycle was defined using the CTG179,000 miles (288000km) as opposed to the 200,000km chosen by Volvo? You discounted the CTG data which may look very similar to the Volvo data if the same definition of lifecycle were used in both. A better way to be comparing bevs to ices would be to determine the break even miles for a national average ice emissions vs miles and Bev emissions vs mile (national ave electrical emissions) both starting with the emissions for manufacturing and disposal.
BCSnob 05/10/21 12:00pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

You chose to believe the environmental impacts of manufacturing ices and bevs in an article you quoted https://www.ucsusa.org/sites/default/files/attach/2015/11/Cleaner-Cars-from-Cradle-to-Grave-full-report.pdf But chose to reject/ignore the comparison of full lifecycle emissions from that same article (50% lower for bevs). What criteria are you using to decide what to believe and what not to believe?
BCSnob 05/10/21 10:43am Around the Campfire
RE: 2019–20 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC POSTINGS

This is a good perspective article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association which touches on your concerns. COVID-19 Vaccines vs Variants—Determining How Much Immunity Is Enough JAMA. 2021;325(13):1241-1243
BCSnob 05/10/21 06:03am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Timmo! you’re right, if people dispose of their vehicles immediately after purchasing them the ICEs will contribute less pollution than BEVs. However, most people choose to drive their vehicles and over the lifetime of use BEVs have lower total lifecycle emissions (according to the same report) On average, battery-electric vehicles have much lower global warming emissions than comparable gaso- line vehicles, despite higher emissions from vehicle manufacturing. For a midsize 84-mile-range BEV, manufac- turing emissions are approximately 15 percent, or 1 ton of CO2e higher than those of a comparable conventional gasoline vehicle. However, total global warming emissions of the midsize BEV, when powered by the electricity grid mix repre- sentative of where BEVs are sold today, are 51 percent lower than the comparable midsize gasoline car, thereby saving 29 tons of CO2e.
BCSnob 05/06/21 12:35pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Good job Timmo!, you gave us half of the comparison. Do the work to complete the comparison by showing us the impacts of mining tar sands proving you’re not being biased about which industry has the greater impact on the environment. Don’t forget about the piles of sulfur produced mining tars sands.
BCSnob 05/06/21 12:16pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

There is a HUGE difference between "does not need to come from strip mines," and "does not come from strip mines." Much, and I mean MUCH lithium today comes from strip mines.Which do you think is worse for the environment, strip mining lithium or tar sands? My guess would be they are equally bad; and yet there is a push to develop tar sands and the emissions in its ultimate use by those who are rejecting EVs because of the impact of strip mining lithium which when used in EVs has much lower emissions than ICEs. Wouldn’t the better environmental approval be to push regulations on strip mining (both resources) forcing the development of cleaner methods of extraction of these resources?
BCSnob 05/06/21 05:04am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

So shipping fuel by pipeline is greener (than shipping by other methods) over the full lifecycle (building and the use) so it’s better but that logic is unacceptable to you when applied to the full lifecycle of BEVs vs full lifecycle of ICEs. For example: distribution of fuel vs electricity over the lifecycle of each vehicle type. Just to be clear, I’m not convinced bevs are greener than ices over their lifecycles; however, I’ve not written bevs off as not being greener (I’ve not seen a full lifecycle comparison of both). All you’ve posted on are the environmental impacts of bevs without examining the impacts of ices being offset with the adoption of bevs. How does that “prove” bevs are worse for the environment than ices? Like the options for transporting fuel, vehicles are bad for the environment; but which ones are the better of the options since I don’t see our population adopting walking and bicycling over all other forms of transportation. Take a look at the change in air quality vividly shown in the documentary “The Year Earth Changed” and then try to convince us that ices are not bad for the environment and we need to examine if alternates are better.
BCSnob 05/05/21 10:49am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

The real question and the analysis you should be posting is if BEV is “greener” than ICE. Which one is better for the environment as a whole? It’s obvious both will/are adversely impacting the environment. The current practice of gas production is destroying Mother Earth in different ways than strip mining lithium. There are many environmental impact stories about oil production and distribution that mirrors the one you’ve posted on the proposed lithium strip mine. Based upon your comments you must be against building the keystone xl pipeline (to not be hypocritical).
BCSnob 05/05/21 09:51am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Isn’t it hypocritical to ignore the offset environmental impact of ICE when looking at the impact of BEVs? You act as if gas production has little to no impact.
BCSnob 05/05/21 09:38am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Lithium does not need to come from strip mines. Lithium from geothermal water: Cornwall UK Geothermal lithium: Sultan Sea CA US DOE funded research on lithium extraction from geothermal waters
BCSnob 05/05/21 08:27am Around the Campfire
RE: New Camping Buddies

I met someone who has working JRTs (go into animal dens); he came to hunt groundhogs on our farm. He raised 2 working JRT pups at the same time. We have several times raised 2 BC pups but I wouldn’t want to raise 2 JRTs. Here is his website: Terrierman He has lots of insights on the instincts in jacks. This blog post of his give a sense of how serious he is about working his dogs Digging on the Dogs
BCSnob 04/30/21 11:38am RV Pet Stop
RE: New Camping Buddies

Duncan being our first dog (first Border Collie) and only dog for several years got a lot of our attention and time. We had him for 4-5 years before we started with sheep herding. We learned several key Border Collie owner lessons: -Border Collies can play fetch indefinitely (at least longer than I am willing to throw) -Playing fetch has short term benefits for the owner's desire for a tired Border Collie; the dog only gets more fit -Throwing a toy (or anything, example stick, rock, glove, pinecone, etc) makes that toy a "throw toy" and no longer a self entertaining toy -Working their brain provides the calm, resting Border Collie the weary owner desires We discovered that playing hide n seek with one of Duncan's toys was a great way to wear him out. We would put him in a stay (sit or down). Show him the toy and then place the toy out of his sight. Come back to him and then tell him to go find it. As he got better at this game we would leave him in a place where he couldn't see what room we went into, he only knew we left the room he was in. He learned to scent for the toy, following the odor trail through the house as we went from him to the hiding location. This meant we had to get more creative; I started dragging the toy along the floor into other rooms before hiding the toy. He then scented and also had to visually search. Herding livestock does both (work the body and work the brain) which is why this breed needs so much. I can take a very physically fit young Border Collie (able to play fetch for hrs) and exhaust them in 5min working sheep because of the mental focus that is involved with this activity.
BCSnob 04/30/21 09:49am RV Pet Stop
RE: New Camping Buddies

The issue most people have with pet Border Collies is that they only focus on their physical exercise needs and ignore their mental exercise needs. Running a Border Collie only makes them more fit and able to run longer and needing to run longer. Making them work their brains tires them out much faster and the effects last longer. The key to getting a calm Border Collie, work their brains. RE Jobs for Border Collies I retired my Nell (15yo in July) from sheep work when she was about 12, since then I haven't given her a job (I suspect she makes up jobs for herself). Recently I've started taking her on a walk to the mailbox (1/4mile from house) so that she gets more exercise (she no longer runs with the other dogs in the yard). During one of these I discovered a new job for her that she's enjoying: carrying the junk mail back to the house. One day I rolled up a newspaper flyer in a tube and play hit her with it; she loved snapping at the tube and then grabbed it and ran off (well fast trot) back to the house carrying the tube. Now it's her job. RE first time swimming Our first Border Collie was Duncan; he loved water (swimming, soaking, splashing and snapping at the splashes, snapping at water jets, etc) and with his long thick coat often had a mildew odor. Our second Border Collie was Starr; as a pup she was buds with Duncan. We took both to a county park for a hike to a stream where there was a pool of waist deep water in the stream. When we got there Duncan immediately ran to the water and swam across the pool. Starr followed her bud and also swam across the pool (first time swimming). When they got to the other side of the pool Duncan started swimming back and Starr realized she didn't know how to swim. When she started back from the other side of the pool she disappeared under the water. I ran to the other side of the pool expecting to need to jump in to save a drowning Starr. Instead I found Starr on the bottom of the pool walking around exploring the bottom. She came up on her own and then decided she really couldn't swim (at least for a few more times). She did eventually decide she liked swimming.
BCSnob 04/30/21 09:26am RV Pet Stop
RE: Moderna vaccine (Personal experiences)

In our house, barks are followed by QUIET!!!!
BCSnob 04/29/21 12:30pm Around the Campfire
RE: GM Spokesperson admits energy to charge cars comes from coal

How much water does it take to put out a vehicle fire where the vehicle is built with aluminum (remember the F150s burned to the ground) and magnesium?
BCSnob 04/28/21 10:05am Tow Vehicles
RE: GM Spokesperson admits energy to charge cars comes from coal

Geothermal waters are not typically tapped for fresh drinking water; the news reports about the South American mine is the aquifer that supplies the drinking water is being used to inject the water into the mine to extract the lithium. Also, more salts are dissolved in hot water then in room temperature water; the geothermal brine is more concentrated than the brine from injected water.
BCSnob 04/28/21 04:23am Tow Vehicles
RE: GM Spokesperson admits energy to charge cars comes from coal

If you’re going to exclude the water used to make the ethanol in the fuel that is being sold at the pumps then EV buyers should be able to say the lithium produced from the Cornwall geothermal mine instead of the lithium from the vastly more water intensive mines in South America was used in their batteries (regardless of where the battery manufacturers got the lithium). The new 'gold rush' for green lithium
BCSnob 04/27/21 07:43pm Tow Vehicles
RE: GM Spokesperson admits energy to charge cars comes from coal

MGX Minerals is pioneering a new concept called “petrolithium.” The idea is to separate the most valuable minerals and salts from the brine water that accompanies petroleum as it’s being pulled up to the surface. Among those valuable minerals in the brine water is lithium carbonate. Petrolithium: Extracting Minerals From Petroleum Brine When a value is added to a waste product innovation often occurs to sell that waste product
BCSnob 04/27/21 03:35pm Tow Vehicles
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