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 > Your search for posts made by 'CALandLIN' found 79 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Advice on tires, towing and Baja please

I HAD (notice that word) a set of Kuhmo 857's, and I drank their KoolAid about the higher load capacity and speed rating. I thought I had found the holy grail of 14" tires, until I had a blowout with less than 6K miles on a 2 year old set. Religiously checked the air pressure every AM, never consistently drove above 65 MPH and kept the tires covered when not in use. Luckily Discount Tire gave me my money back after I showed them the receipt for the tire I had to buy somewhere in Wyoming....the damage to the trailer from the blown tire came out of my pocket. Did you discover the cause of the failure?
CALandLIN 07/02/19 11:08am Travel Trailers
RE: Advice on tires, towing and Baja please

It comes with Goodyear Endurance ST 205/75/ R 14 105N D1. For those of you that take your trailer down rough asphalt roads like in Baja, do you think this tire is up to the task or should I upgrade? What tire would you upgrade to? Thanks for taking the time to read this. You probably already have the best RV trailer tires for your travel plans. The GY Endurance tires have built-in sidewall scuff guards and are, to my knowledge, the only ST tires available with that feature. Kuhmo 857 tires are a European commercial grade trailer tire with a higher total load capacity available with a 14" tire.
CALandLIN 06/29/19 07:34am Travel Trailers
RE: Tire pressure

When Goodyear introduced their new (Endurance) ST tire line-up they had a new size. It's a ST255/85R16 LRE with a load capacity of 4080# @ 80 PSI. I noticed that some of the newer Montana 5th wheel trailers are coming with those tires as OEM. It's a little surprising to see a Keystone trailer with high dollar OEM tires. I also noticed another ST tire manufacturer touting that size, Greenball.
CALandLIN 06/14/19 01:09am Fifth-Wheels
RE: 10 ply tires?

Hello Any issues going from d range 8 ply 65 psi to 10 ply 80 psi, on the stock rims on my rockwood 8281ws? Thanks The trailer’s original equipment wheels were used on your trailer because they will support the maximum load of the vehicle certified axles. Tires mounted on them with excess load capacity are just providing load capacity reserves. The wheels are not in danger for the tire excess load capacity unless the trailer axles are overloaded. You need to insure the replacement tires are a compatible fitment to the OE wheels. Some wheels will have their maximum load capacity displayed somewhere on the wheel. Wheels marked like that will support a tire PSI pressure needed to meet the wheel’s maximum load capacity. Some wheels will have certified load and PSI values. When that is the case the PSI value cannot be higher than the wheel’s cold recommendation. Wheel rim width MUST be compatible with the replacement tires acceptable width range. Valve stem PSI ratings are often overlooked when using replacement tires with higher recommended PSI values.
CALandLIN 06/10/19 03:55pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: What am I missing on GVWR??

The GVWR is the vehices load limit. The excess GAWR is load capacity reserves. Read any owners manual. Read the FMVSS (standards). You cannot point a finger at the manufacturer when they have told you so and put it on the vehicle certification label and in vehicle owner's manual. If it's over weight and busts it's the owners fault, PERIOD!.
CALandLIN 06/04/19 10:17pm Truck Campers
RE: Goodyear Endurance Tire Pressure

Yes, the original tires were Load Range D tires. Recap: You got new tires because you wanted the GY brand. Your original tires were ST225/75R15 LRD. GY Endurance is only manufactured with a LRE in that size. Both the LRD & LRE (any brand in that size) conform to the same load inflation charts. So, no problem, at 65 PSI both will provide 2540# of load capacity. The LRE will provide 2830# of load capacity when inflated to 80 PSI. Your wheels are rated for that load and PSI. Make sure your valve stems are good for 80 PSI or greater. Steel ones would be best. Usually people purchasing new trailer tires go up a load range to provide a higher percentage of load capacity reserves. Probably all RV trailers with a build date of 2018 or later will have tires that conform to the RVIA recommended minimum load capacity reserves of 10% above vehicle certified GAWRs. Using a ST trailer tire’s full load capacity potential is hardly ever going to damage the tire. Tire industry standards (USTMA) fully supports the OE tire load capacity with this statement. “Replacement tires MUST provide a load capacity equal to or greater than what the OE tires provided”. So, it’s your option to use any inflation pressure between the minimum acceptable 65 PSI, all the way to the tire sidewall maximum permissible PSI.
CALandLIN 05/29/19 08:53pm Towing
RE: Selecting new TT Tires

Bias ply have two benefits. They’re more forgiving of curbs and potholes and, if one blows at highway speed, they simply fly apart. Radials roll easier, cooler and last many more miles as far as tread wear, but not years. When a radial blows at highway speed, they often beat the trailer with steel belts causing extensive damage. I have 14” Carlisle bias ply on my boat trailer with good results. I’m thinking of trying a set of 15” bias ply Carlisle’s on our TT this fall. A worthwhile read if contemplating new bias ply tires. Click Here!
CALandLIN 05/23/19 04:16pm Towing
RE: Selecting new TT Tires

JIMNLIN wrote: Bias ply are from another era. For a road trailer the radial tire is the way to go. RVIA has come out in support of that statement by recommending all of their members - about 98% of all RV trailer manufacturers - to start using radial tires on all wheels 13" in diameter or larger. Click Here!
CALandLIN 05/15/19 11:46am Towing
RE: Selecting new TT Tires

If you ran any distance at all on the other tire on that side of the trailer it's probably sustained substantual internal damage. Best bet is like others say, move up a new set of LRE tires, same size. BUT, get some with a speed rating higher than 65 MPH.
CALandLIN 05/13/19 02:30pm Towing
RE: 17.5 wheels

Call and ask them. Click Here!
CALandLIN 04/28/19 08:58pm Do It Yourself Modifications and Upgrades (DIY)
RE: GVWR, AXLE Ratings, and Tire Load Range???

My rims had stamped on back side.....3200lbs (see pic below) I purchased the GY Endurance 235-80-16E Rims are rated at 80psi NOTE: I even replaced the spare with a less costly E rated tire in same size https://i.imgur.com/06PUKo4l.jpg Good choice. I was surprised to see your OE tires were LRD. Most ST manufacturers quit production on them because the RV trailer industry abused them so badly by installing them on 6000# axles. I personally had bad experiences with them as the USA GY marathons that were OEM on my fiver were on 6000# axles and all five of them failed and a couple more replacements until I got trailer tire wise and went up to LRE. I hope you got new valve stems for the 80 PSI LRE tires?
CALandLIN 04/21/19 11:14am Towing
RE: good tires

The following is an out of context quote from a major tire manufacturer; “Tires should always be replaced with the same size designation — or approved options — as recommended by the vehicle manufacturer.” I have highlighted size designation. Most don’t know that it is the proper nomenclature for tire size. If they do they just overlook it as another obstacle they rather not have to deal with when it’s time for replacement tires. ST235/85R16 is a size designation. LT235/85R16 is a size designation. In the world of tire industry standards those designations are not interchangeable. None of them are unless approved by the vehicle manufacturer. In the automotive tire world the vehicle manufacturers provide retailers with listings of approved tire sizes and options. That process does not exist in the RV trailer industry. Owner’s seeking recommendations from RV trailer manufacturers seldom get satisfaction with their replies and seek recommendations from elsewhere. Tire quality grading, load indexes, load ranges and speed restrictions are not a part of a tire’s designated size.
CALandLIN 04/19/19 12:25am Towing
RE: good tires

hey guys had not been on in a while so trying to catch up abit,but here is a question I have a 2013 29ft Springdale travel trailer that needs replacement tires before we go camping again the tires had never been replaced and are in bad shape any ideal on a good set of tires that will hold up pretty good price is no issue,I have been looking at maxxis and a couple of other brands tires now are ST 225/75R 15,someone that I know said that the 15"tires are getting hard to find Obviously you haven't had any problems with your current tires so why don't you just pick a brand that is easy to find and be done with it. You could consider going up to a LRE if the OE tires are LRD. Change to valve stems that support 80+ PSI and use steel caps on them.
CALandLIN 04/15/19 01:22pm Towing
RE: trailer tires

When going from d rated to e rated Should the e rated tires always be inflated to the maximum pressure regardless of how much weight there is? Anything above vehicle manufacturer recommended 65 PSI is optional. But, you waste your money for additional load capacity reserves if you don't use some of it. Maximum inflation for Original Equipment trailer tires is a normal recommendation. It's not a requirement for higher load capacity replacements.
CALandLIN 04/09/19 11:21pm Tech Issues
RE: "LT" tire pressures on Expedition

I moved up from "Heavy Load" tires on my Expedition to real "LT" tires. Max air pressure on the new tires is 80#, max pressure on the heavy load tires was 50#. I always ran my other tires at max pressure when towing my TT. I talked to the tire installer and asked him what they set the pressure at and he responded, "To whatever is specified on the door sticker". This will be in the 36 - 38# range. What do you all do? I was thinking all along I should run much higher pressure on the LTs just like I did on the heavy load tires. Thanks in advance... To double check the installers figures you have to use the load capacity the OE tires provided at vehicle manufacturer recommended inflation pressures. Then find the chart for the replacement tires and compare the load capacity they are providing at the installers recommended inflation pressures. Industry standards require a minimum load capacity equal to what the OE tires were providing.
CALandLIN 04/09/19 10:57pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Do I need D tires?

Tire sizes are properly identified by their Size Designation. ST225/75R15 is a designated size. LT235/85R16 is a designated size. Load capacities for ST & LT tires are identified by a load range letter on their sidewalls. Some designated sizes are built in more than one load range. Load range is not part of the designated size any more than a speed rating. The original tires that came on a trailer with a designated size having a LRD load capacity rating are completely interchangeable with a LRE. It's up to the owner to insure the replacements have a load capacity equal to what the OE tires provided.
CALandLIN 04/07/19 09:40am Travel Trailers
RE: Do I need D tires?

Were not talking off road tires here As I said before..... A tire with a higher ply rating has benefits beyond the load rating. It is more puncture resistant. I also said that this MAY be important to you.... Many of us DO tow off the pavement. Especially out west. For us it is the "norm" If that is not your "norm", by all means, ignore my advice....Heck, even if it is your norm, you are free to ignore my advice.... It is your money, and your time spent changing tires.... And ultimately, your choice. Identical tires with a load range increase from “C” to “D” are still physically the same designated size. Without documentation of the addition of a durability factor they are both equal in that respect. The “D” has an increase in ply rating. The materials needed to allow the tire to become stronger and carry more weight via increased inflation pressures in no way (unless documented) increases that tires durability. Some tire manufacturers will, at some point, add an extra steel belt for puncture resistance. That is strictly a durability item and it has no effect on the tires load capacity.What sort of documentation do you require? The example was in my last paragraph. What proof is there without a tire manufacturer's statement to the fact? A lot of their individual information is confidential and they are not going to reveal it for all to see. Please remember that you mentioned "puncture resistant". That's a durability factor and a tire manufacturer would never miss the opportunity to tout better durability. For instance; GY advertises the addition of scuff guard protection built-into their Endurance ST tires. They have nothing to do with the tire's strength. However, they are probably more resistant to curb strikes.
CALandLIN 04/02/19 04:20pm Travel Trailers
RE: Do I need D tires?

Were not talking off road tires here As I said before..... A tire with a higher ply rating has benefits beyond the load rating. It is more puncture resistant. I also said that this MAY be important to you.... Many of us DO tow off the pavement. Especially out west. For us it is the "norm" If that is not your "norm", by all means, ignore my advice....Heck, even if it is your norm, you are free to ignore my advice.... It is your money, and your time spent changing tires.... And ultimately, your choice. Identical tires with a load range increase from “C” to “D” are still physically the same designated size. Without documentation of the addition of a durability factor they are both equal in that respect. The “D” has an increase in ply rating. The materials needed to allow the tire to become stronger and carry more weight via increased inflation pressures in no way (unless documented) increases that tires durability. Some tire manufacturers will, at some point, add an extra steel belt for puncture resistance. That is strictly at durability item and it has no effect on the tires load capacity.
CALandLIN 04/02/19 11:33am Travel Trailers
RE: Do I need D tires?

What exactly is load range D anyway? I know it will allow 65 psi inflation, but what is the load limit? All ST & LT tires have a maximum load capacity determined by their manufacturer. Inflation pressures are needed for the tire to provide various levels of load capacity. A load range lettering system was established by the entire industry to simplify and standardize recommended tire inflation pressures. For each maximum load range there is a letter on the sidewall of the tire along with the inflation pressure necessary to achieve maximum load capacity from that tire. Here are the standard load range letters and their PSI ratings for radial ply tires. LRC=50 PSI - LRD=65 PSI - LRE=80 PSI - LRF=95 PSI - LRG=110 PSI.
CALandLIN 03/31/19 12:41pm Travel Trailers
RE: Time to Buy New Tires

I'm keeping the size that Jayco wanted me to have. Never heard of an RV manufacturer dictating to customers what size tires "they should have" Read your owner's manual, it's in there.To funny, I have bought several new trailers through the years and NEVER received a owners manual. Just a collection of literature from the various manufacturer's of products used in the trailer. Maybe you can point out just where the manufacturer stated exclusively to use only the tire size that it came with. I could understand a manufacturer not wanting a lesser tire to meet maximum load capacity. Vehicles are calibrated to use a certain size tire. Trailers clearance is usually the limiting factor along with cost to the manufacturer. To maintain tire safety, purchase new tires that are the same size as the vehicle’s original tires or another size recommended by the manufacturer. Look at the Tire and Loading Information label, or the sidewall of the tire you are replacing to find this information. That statement/similar statement is mandated by NHTSA to be in all RV trailer owner manuals.
CALandLIN 03/25/19 08:28am Travel Trailers
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