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 > Your search for posts made by 'CapriRacer' found 50 matches.

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RE: Tire went flat in the driveay. Damage?

.... For starters, I would stop buying antique tires built up with multiple cotton plys. ;) ..... I'm pretty sure only a few people got that joke! Probably. Heck even the letter grades are outdated. They give the load ratings in pounds in the modern world and that's what counts. I think you mean Load Index. The load rating in pounds has been required for over 50 years - when tires came under federal regulation about 1970. Load Ranges were in effect at that time. And this is where it gets complicated. The Europeans came up with the idea of Load Index, but they still use Ply Rating, not Load Ranges. It's complicated because most tire manufacturers use all 3 on the sidewall (with some exceptions.) Not to mention that it is also a federal requirement to indicate what the tire is made out of (aside from rubber), so the sidewall will typically say something like: "Sidewall: 2 plies polyester Tread: 2 plies polyester, 2 plies steel, 2 plies polyamide"
CapriRacer 01/13/21 07:27am Towing
RE: Tire went flat in the driveay. Damage?

.... For starters, I would stop buying antique tires built up with multiple cotton plys. ;) ..... I'm pretty sure only a few people got that joke!
CapriRacer 01/12/21 06:49am Towing
RE: Tire went flat in the driveay. Damage?

I came out this morning and the left tire on my utility trailer was dead flat. Just came back from a 260 mile round trip, and it was up and fine when I went to bed last night. The valve stem failed catastrophically during the night. Glad it didn't happen on the road. Would the tire have sustained any damage from just going flat in the driveway? Tire is only 2 years old. The risk here is that there may be damage inside. The safe thing to do is replace the tire. If you reinflate the tire (do this carefully!!) and see sidewall ripples, replace the tire. If you reinflate the tire and don't see sidewall ripples, that doesn't mean the tire is good. It means you don't know!
CapriRacer 01/12/21 06:46am Towing
RE: Another tire question

My new trailer came with Load range H tires. Is that a problem?;) No, because a Load Range H inflated to Load Range E (or whatever) inflation pressure behaves like a LR E (or whatever). You might want to consider WHY you have a LR H on the vehicle. A bit more information would be helpful, like: Year, make, and model of vehicleWhat does the vehicle tire placard says about size, Load Range, and inflation pressure?Did you weigh it? What did you get?Make and model of tireWhat inflation pressure are you using now? How did you determine that?
CapriRacer 12/15/20 05:55am Travel Trailers
RE: RV parked for a lengthy period

The real problem here with tires is not the concrete. It's with the sitting. Tires can flatspot. The more load (less inflation), and the longer it sits, the worse the flatspotting. I've heard of tires flatspotting in 3 months. But the vehicle has sat for a year, so it undoubtedly has flatspots. What to do? First, move the vehicle forward or backward a half a tire revolution (4 feet?). That would put another flatspot 180° out of phase, which is better because the suspension reacts to a single flatspot worse than 2 flatspots. Or jack it put and rotate the tires 1/2 turn. Another would be to overinflate the tires - say 20 psi. No!!, the tire will not explode (unless it is damaged, but then it was going to explode sometime later anyway!)
CapriRacer 12/14/20 04:42am General RVing Issues
RE: Another tire question

There is an E speed rating, but in this case, it's referring to the Load Range. It's a way of designating how much load a tire can carry: For the same size, a LR E will carry more load than a LR D (albeit at a higher inflation pressure.) The old way of doing this was "Ply Rating" and the old 10PR = LR E - BUT - that confused many people into thinking that 10 PR actually had 10 plies! Not true, as a typical LR E tire uses 4 plies - 2 polyester body plies and 2 steel belts. The weight, sidewall stiffness. and RR of a LR E is only slightly worse than a LR D - and that's because LR D tires also have - typically - 2 polyester body plies and 2 steel belts, just a bit stronger. That means you shouldn't worry about using a LR E in place of a LR D - the differences are minor.
CapriRacer 12/13/20 06:25am Travel Trailers
RE: Replacing 1972 16.5 Inch Rims Advice

Here's a link that might help: Barry's Tire Tech: 16.5" Tires
CapriRacer 12/11/20 06:30am Tow Vehicles
RE: E rated tire with max psi of 65?

...... While you SAY burst pressure the reason, then add that burst is many times the max pressure, it would seem that 80 psi rather than 65 psi, would not cause burst. ..... What's really going on here is fatigue strength. Wikipedia: Fatigue (material) Tires are all about fatigue and in order to design a tire to go through 10's of millions of cycles (rotations), the designers uses the burst pressure as a reference and then uses a factor to increase the strength to get the desired fatigue life - which they get from an S-N Curve for the material in question. So while tires don't burst at 80 or 100, or 150 psi, that burst pressure is an indicator as to the fatigue life. Good to see where your info comes from. While there are many types of tires, if you would have taken the time to read the link Burb posted, it is a hybrid type (dual purpose) tire, that by design, would work best, considering sidewall and tread at 65 psi. Other tires purpose will vary, and while e-rated, may also be less than 80 psi. ...... Ah .... That's not how it works. The simplest way to describe this is to say: 1) that the WORST condition is the onroad condition, because heat is the tire killer! So the fact that we are discussing an onroad/offroad tire still means the onroad condition is what the tire engineer has to design against. 2) that the tables were set up (over 80 years ago!) so that a construction for a given Load Range works for all tire sizes - which means that when a tire gets to a certain size, it can't withstand the stress, so the Load Range drops down to the next lower increment - in this case from 80 psi down to 65 psi.
CapriRacer 12/04/20 04:57am Tow Vehicles
RE: E rated tire with max psi of 65?

There seems to be some question about where I got my information that larger sized E Load Range tires use 65 psi max pressure rather than the usual 80 psi max - and that maybe onroad/offroad has something to do with it. I have in front of me the 2020 Tire and Rim Association (TRA) Yearbook. TRA is the source standard for the load tables (among other things!) for US based tire manufacturers. In that book are ALL the current load tables for EVERY type of tire (except aircraft - separate book - and anything non-standard) It shows many E Load Range LT tire sizes as having 65 psi max pressures as well as the ones we normally deal with (including sizes that aren't produced!) The tables do NOT refer to onroad/offroad as one of the parameters in determining the max pressure. However, it does reference changes in load carrying capacity for various speeds. (again, no change in the max pressure!) And lastly, why do my posts take so long to show up? I normally post in the morning - part of my daily ritual. I only recently updated to a smart phone and haven't yet figured out how to connect it to my email alerts. Plus, does this site give email alerts? More things to learn about! (edit: When I clicked to post the above, I found how to get email alerts! Now to learn how to link the phone to my email so I get alerts!)
CapriRacer 12/03/20 06:14am Tow Vehicles
RE: E rated tire with max psi of 65?

Where are all the tire engineers when you need them? My wag is that these tires are designed as onroad/offroad, so even though e-rated, a lesser max pressure is best for the hybrid use, that the tread and sidewalls are designed for. JMO, but I'd not use a wider tire, than what the rim is designed for. Jerry So here I am. It's a long story why some E Load Range tires have a max pressure of 65 psi, but it deals with the burst pressure - ergo larger sized tires will have the lower pressure. It has nothing to do with onroad/offroad. This is not unique to E Load range tires. And just to assure some folks: The burst pressure of a tire is many times the max pressure. Tires do NOT burst based solely on the pressure. They will burst if they hit an object hard enough, regardless of the actual pressure in the tire. They'll also burst if cut deep enough to cut cords!
CapriRacer 12/02/20 04:33am Tow Vehicles
RE: Strange advice

More fuel for the fire: The questioner in the article could just be that poor, unlucky fellow whose statistics ran out on him and he got 2 road hazards the same day. Been know to happen
CapriRacer 11/29/20 06:19am General RVing Issues
RE: Tire Valve Stem Cracking

I work at a medium size RV dealership. Tens of thousands of customers over the years (41 years) Probably MILLIONS of tires over those years. NOT ONCE HAVE I HAD A CUSTOMER COME BACK AND COMPLAIN ABOUT A FAILURE OF VALVE STEMS. This post is much ado about NOTHING. Doug A 3rd vote that there have been problems. I've lost 2 tires - at high speed - due to old valve stems. Never again will I cheap out.
CapriRacer 11/03/20 05:43am Tech Issues
RE: PSI rating variables

First, there ought to be a tire placard somewhere on the vehicle. I've heard it is common for that to be near the driver's front corner. What does it say for tire size and pressure? Use that as a first step. Second, it would be good to weigh the trailer - individual tire weights if possible - if not, at least axle by axle. Then you need to add a factor if you didn't get individual tire weights - 7% if axle by axle, 12% if all axles together. Then compare that to the load carrying capacity of the tires. I am of the opinion that tires should be loaded to more than 85% of their capacity at the pressure used. You never told us what tire size you have so I am wondering why anyone would think they could give you advice! Mix of LT's and ST's, yes! But are the numbers even the same? I am going to suggest you prioritize getting all the tires replaced. You're in Southern California, and the sun can really take a toll!
CapriRacer 10/26/20 07:03am Toy Haulers
"Goodyear Endurance Tire Failures"

Here's the link to the closed discussion: https://forums.goodsamclub.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/30102538/gotomsg/30158262.cfm#30158262 I didn't get to comment on the last post, so I am doing it here. First, thanks to cummins2014 for the help on the google key word search. That indeed brought up some complaints - HOWEVER - none of them on the first page were actual failures. They were ALL road hazard failures! This took me a couple of hours to wade through all the discussion threads brought up - and interestingly, there were many discussion covering the same points raised in this forum! Needless to say I am pretty peeved to have spent so much time on a fruitless search. Conclusion: There have been no reports of structural failures with the Goodyear Endurance ST tires - only road hazard related ones.
CapriRacer 10/22/20 07:57am Fifth-Wheels
RE: I need new Tires

At this point, it appears we have a "Yes, there are.... No, there aren't!" type of argument. Since one can't post a link to something that doesn't exist, then we need a links to posts where they are said to exist. I did a quick google search. but didn't find any posts, but maybe I am using key words that don't bring them up. As someone who is interested from a technical point of view, I am asking for help. Please!! Post some links. As said in my previous post I googled the Endurance ,and there was some reading to be had . Reports of lost tread , bubbles in the tread etc, and a few pictures . I googled Goodyear Endurance tire failures , and just telling what I read . If you want to read it google it same as I did, as was suggested by another on this thread, they apparently found the same reading I did. It was not difficult . They probably felt the same way I do about links, if you really want to know ,go looking, google it . Some have made claims that there are only road hazard problems with the Endurance, the links I read suggest otherwise ,seems to be a few defective tires. All I can say is read it ,and come to your own conclusion, you are the tire expert . Maybe you can give some light on these reports on the Endurance . If I remember correctly you gave a glowing report on Endurance awhile back , correct me if I am wrong . So I googled "Endurance" and no tire related stuff in the first 10 pages. I then googled "Goodyear Endurance", and 10 pages later, still didn't find any reported failures. So - again - links please.
CapriRacer 10/21/20 09:50am Fifth-Wheels
RE: I need new Tires

At this point, it appears we have a "Yes, there are.... No, there aren't!" type of argument. Since one can't post a link to something that doesn't exist, then we need a links to posts where they are said to exist. I did a quick google search. but didn't find any posts, but maybe I am using key words that don't bring them up. As someone who is interested from a technical point of view, I am asking for help. Please!! Post some links.
CapriRacer 10/21/20 06:23am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Goodyear Endurance Tires VS Carlisle Trail HD Tires

It might be time for me to mix things up a bit! 1) An ST tire carries much more load than a similar sized LT tire: LT235/85R16 LR E = 3085# @ 80 psi, ST235/85R16 LR E = 3640# @ 80 psi (+18%). That means that at least one of the government tests is more stringent for ST tires. 2) US Government testing procedures do NOT produce a tire that will perform well in the US market (This applies to Passenger Car tires, LT tires, AND ST tires!) Nowadays, the tire has to EXCEED the government minimums by a good percentage to perform adequately.
CapriRacer 10/12/20 04:50am Travel Trailers
RE: Tire Pressure Chart For Continental Tires

Please note that the Continental chart and the Toyo Chart are the same - and they came from the Tire and Rim Yearbook.
CapriRacer 09/28/20 06:33am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Tire Pressure Chart For Continental Tires

I can't seem to find a psi chart for Continental tires. Anyone on here that can steer me to one. Sorry, but Tire Load Tables are NOT specific to a brand of tires. They are published by tire standardizing organizations such The Tire and Rim Association (US based) and are the same regardless of the manufacturer. You can sometimes find portions of those tables published by tire manufacturers, but those are only reproductions of what the standardizing body published. So to answer your question: ANY table will work. Just make sure the table you use is appropriate to the application. There will be difference based on what kind of vehicle and the intended service. Then why do two different Michelin tires of the same size 295/80R22.5, the ZXA2 and the H Coach have different load tables, and why do my Toyo's of the same size have yet again different tables? Maybe that works for car tires, but it doesn't work for large truck/RV tires Because Michelin - in their infinite wisdom - didn't tell you that they modified the tables according to the service (in particular speed). Figures that Michelin would complicate something that is supposed to be simple! (Jadatis has a post above this one that explains in more detail.) As far as Toyo is concerned - I couldn't find a load table on the internet for any of their 295/80R22.5's. Do you have a link?
CapriRacer 09/27/20 07:06am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Tire Pressure Chart For Continental Tires

I can't seem to find a psi chart for Continental tires. Anyone on here that can steer me to one. Sorry, but Tire Load Tables are NOT specific to a brand of tires. They are published by tire standardizing organizations such The Tire and Rim Association (US based) and are the same regardless of the manufacturer. You can sometimes find portions of those tables published by tire manufacturers, but those are only reproductions of what the standardizing body published. So to answer your question: ANY table will work. Just make sure the table you use is appropriate to the application. There will be difference based on what kind of vehicle and the intended service.
CapriRacer 09/25/20 06:32am Class A Motorhomes
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