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 > Your search for posts made by 'Coach-man' found 11 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Ram 2500/Cummins

The important thing to worry about is your “pin weight” That is the weight that is put inside your bed. That effects your suspension, front and rear and things like steering! In your RAM 2500, if it is “heavy Duty”, you should have the same transmission, breaks, differential as a 3500. So the next thing to check is your tires, and their rated capacity. While things like “helper springs” air bags and other “fixes” can solve an issue, you need to look at the truck as a whole to ensure your towing safely.
Coach-man 11/18/21 07:01am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Residential fridge

That is the downer to residential fridges! If you stay put for long periods, and only move occasionally then they are great! Now, if your on the move a lot, your going to have to become an “expert” on batteries, and inverters. Starting with the alternators, yes plural. In your truck. Did your rig come with an inverter? What size is it, does it power more than the fridge? Perhaps, you need to upgrade it, or add one if not present? What is the amp rating on your house batteries? Typically, the factory ships their rigs without batteries, which are provided by the dealer at the time of sale. Again, they typically install the smallest, cheapest batteries they can get away with providing! Some people install a couple of 6 volt golf cart batteries, to ensure they are providing enough amps to run things! That would then require, looking at your charging systems, both in the trailer, and in your truck, keeping the batteries charged! Yep a residential fridge can become an expensive option, if you outfit your truck and rig to support it! Good luck! Actually, 2 12v "marine" batteries will usually provide a few more amp hours of storage than the typical 6v golf cart batteries but will require more frequent charging to avoid damage. In my experience, it's usually 225-230 Ah for 2 12v batteries (voltage stays at 12v but Ah doubles when connected in parallel), but the typical 6v golf cart batteries are around 210 Ah and stay at that level when connected in series for 12v power. The =real= advantage to deep cycle 6v golf cart batteries is that they can be drawn down a lot further than so-called "deep cycle" 12v batteries without damage, and can do so many, many times. Lyle As long as we are splitting hairs, I have found Marine type batteries just a little better than useless! The so called “marine” battery is part “deep cycle” and part starting battery. Designed for people with trolling motors, as well as the “big” out board. Instead of getting the best of both worlds, you wind up with the worst of both worlds. A good deep cycle will not have a cold crank rating, used for starting. Your RV environment usually consists of the batteries sitting with a trickle charge for long periods, followed by running them way down. Only big draw back with the 6 Volt golf cart batteries is you must keep an eye on the water level, “high maintenance”. Good luck.
Coach-man 10/19/21 08:55am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Residential fridge

If your inverter is setup up correctly, and is sized for the load, I suspect your problem is with the house battery (s). As I mentioned previously, dealers install the smallest and cheapest batteries in these rigs! I would suggest you look at least two 6 volt golf cart batteries wired in series to produce 12 volts to support your setup. I really doubt your truck alternator is the problem.
Coach-man 10/17/21 04:16pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Residential fridge

That is the downer to residential fridges! If you stay put for long periods, and only move occasionally then they are great! Now, if your on the move a lot, your going to have to become an “expert” on batteries, and inverters. Starting with the alternators, yes plural. In your truck. Did your rig come with an inverter? What size is it, does it power more than the fridge? Perhaps, you need to upgrade it, or add one if not present? What is the amp rating on your house batteries? Typically, the factory ships their rigs without batteries, which are provided by the dealer at the time of sale. Again, they typically install the smallest, cheapest batteries they can get away with providing! Some people install a couple of 6 volt golf cart batteries, to ensure they are providing enough amps to run things! That would then require, looking at your charging systems, both in the trailer, and in your truck, keeping the batteries charged! Yep a residential fridge can become an expensive option, if you outfit your truck and rig to support it! Good luck! ONE alternator in my 15 RAM, two 6V batteries and one 1,000 watt inverter in RV. ALWAYS arrive with temps the same as when I left even on my 33 hour trip mentioned above. One time I did arrive with temps up. Reason was the batteries were on their last leg. Trip to Costco and all has been well since. That may well be true! There are options for two alternators on these vehicles! I was expressing to the OP what he “MIGHT” encounter going down this road. There are many variables, and you can not post on a particular situation and expect that to cover all alternatives! Congratulations on YOUR PARTICULAR situation, but it does not cover all situations. Not to mention all the alternative’s and allow the OP to think his situation and yours are identical is doing him a diservice!
Coach-man 10/17/21 12:18pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Residential fridge

That is the downer to residential fridges! If you stay put for long periods, and only move occasionally then they are great! Now, if your on the move a lot, your going to have to become an “expert” on batteries, and inverters. Starting with the alternators, yes plural. In your truck. Did your rig come with an inverter? What size is it, does it power more than the fridge? Perhaps, you need to upgrade it, or add one if not present? What is the amp rating on your house batteries? Typically, the factory ships their rigs without batteries, which are provided by the dealer at the time of sale. Again, they typically install the smallest, cheapest batteries they can get away with providing! Some people install a couple of 6 volt golf cart batteries, to ensure they are providing enough amps to run things! That would then require, looking at your charging systems, both in the trailer, and in your truck, keeping the batteries charged! Yep a residential fridge can become an expensive option, if you outfit your truck and rig to support it! Good luck!
Coach-man 10/17/21 06:58am Fifth-Wheels
RE: F250 or F350 to Haul a 5th Wheel???

IMHO, diesel does have the power but it is not a cost effective option. Especially with the new 7.3L gas engine an 10 speed transmission. With the correct rear axle ratio you will have no problems in the mountains and you will save yourself over $10,000. Don't kid yourself. Yes there have been improvements to gassers especially the 10 speed tranny. However a gas engine is not a substitute for a diesel at that weight. 16k GVW puts you in diesel territory, especially if there are mountains involved. At 16K an exhaust brake is also a very worthwhile feature I agree 100%, the exhaust braking capabilities alone is worth the extra $$ for the Diesel! And don’t kid yourself, Diesel’s have not been just sitting around do nothing while the gassers were improving! Definitely Diesel, especially if you going to pull thru the mountains!
Coach-man 06/21/21 08:42am Fifth-Wheels
RE: F250 or F350 to Haul a 5th Wheel???

With that weighty out will need a one ton vehicle. If you insist on a Ford, a 450 would be a better option. Check out a RAM 3500, when a truck gets picked as “car of the year”, they are trying to tell you something!,
Coach-man 06/20/21 05:57am Fifth-Wheels
RE: full size corner bed vs queen corner bed

Conner beds are not my cup of tea! They are really hard to make up, and if your on the inside, hope you can sleep the entire night without waking up!
Coach-man 04/20/21 02:16pm Class C Motorhomes
2018 Keystone Premier 22RB

Any comments, good/Bad with this rig? Considering a purchase, I have owned Class A, Class C and a 5th wheel previously. DW would like to go on the road for occasional long weekends, and a couple of “trips”, 1 to two weeks a year. Things to watch for, and any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Coach-man 02/26/21 10:40am Travel Trailers
RE: Ram 2500 only carries 2300 lbs.

WOW things never change on this web site! People getting sued millions for exceeding pay load capacity’s, insurance voiding your life insurance, and why didn’t you just buy the 3500 model, its only a couple hundred dollars more! Get real people, and relax, DOT could care less about recreational trucks, they have all they can do to keep up with the commercial trucks. Show us the small print on your policy that excludes coverage for exceeding the weight limits?
Coach-man 02/26/21 09:07am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Ram 2500 only carries 2300 lbs.

How much does it “squat”, when loaded? You see, the thing about RAM is the 2500 HD uses the same engine, (6.7 liter Diesel), the same transmission, the same brakes, the same rear end, and the same frame as the RAM 3500.! The things to watch for are the spring rates, and tires. I had a 2017 4x4 RAM towing a 35 foot 5th wheel, it “squatted” about 1 inch between empty and hooked up to fully loaded 5th wheel, pin weight was 2,350 pounds. I had some stout Toyo tires 12 ply and rated to take the weight, and everything was fine. `Now if your going to be worried about the “paper” weight limits, your going to have trade up to a 3500. Keep in mind the weight limits Keep in mind that those differences are based on regulatory limits not necessarily engineering differences. In many states there is a significant difference in registration fees between the 2500 models and the 3500 models because of the weight differences. So they artificially debate the 2500 so that its registration fees are in line with the 1500, otherwise they would be the same as a 3500. Good luck.
Coach-man 02/25/21 01:54pm Fifth-Wheels
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