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 > Your search for posts made by 'Copperhead' found 24 matches.

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RE: using a 2012 ridgeline for towing

Depending on what they are doing, I never chastise anyone for towing with a 1/2 ton. On the other hand, I prefer to not tow anything with less than the 3/4 ton that I have. I prefer the stability, brakes, etc over the typical 1/2 ton. There is more to it than that. What all the OEM's have done to their 1/2 tons has made all of them undesirable to me. That is all brands.
Copperhead 08/27/19 10:02pm Travel Trailers
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

Whenever I click on these links, I get an "Error 101, the owner of this website does not allow hot linking".
Copperhead 08/18/19 10:52am Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla Semi truck unveil & test ride set for Oct 26th !

Thanks for the education and some 'real world' insight. Do you see E-trucks as viable/practical as urban delivery vehicles? Frito Lay has a plant/distribution facility in our area, I have seen a medium duty Frito Lay E-truck making deliveries to the supermarket we frequent. Don't know what their overall fleet looks like, but there's at least one roaming the streets here. An interesting observation as well about driver hours and mandated rest periods. Explains why the only rest area on I-4 just east of Orlando is 'standing room only' at night. And why, when Fl DOT proposed permanently closing this rest area as part of a 21 mile renovation project, the trucking industry vehemently protested and FDOT reversed their decision. Yes, urban delivery is called local P&D (pickup and delivery) that I mentioned, along with terminal to terminal relay operations. I just don't see it as viable for the long haul sector. But the same thing is observable when it comes to Natural Gas powered semi trucks. They are fine for local P&D and terminal to terminal operations, but have a long way to go to make it into the long haul part of commercial trucking. As much as T. Boone Pickens and others myopically stated that the entire trucking sector could convert to NG and will do so in 20 year (he stated that almost 20 years ago). We don't hear from that old codger anymore either. Just another hype to garner attention and appease the greeenie crowd, while at the same time making life more difficult for those already in the profession. I will admit, the NG solution even caught my attention. The fuel network has a long way to go to garner the OTR market. But it is about as close to realistic as anything has gotten thus far. One thing I have become acutely aware of is that when folks who have no real experience in logistics try to interject their ideas into the foray, they usually mess things up more than actually provide viable solutions. But, just like even a blind squirrel will find a nut occasionally, there are rare occurrences when outside ideas are credible. Usually offered by people who are not seeking the limelight such as Musk and Pickens.
Copperhead 08/18/19 10:36am Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla Semi truck unveil & test ride set for Oct 26th !

Great point Copperhead, as I understand they have 2 that are going to be real world test mules with a carrier to see how they fit in. Seems like a reasonable plan. Yep. https://www.greencarcongress.com/2019/08/20190815-ecascadia.html My cousin is a mechanical engineer working for that group. Traditional OEM’s will find it much easier to electrify their platforms than stubborn Elon will to produce anything reliable. This BEV “technology” isn’t exactly rocket science. Shipping quality vehicles to meet a wide variety of customer markets is much more difficult. Those Cascadia trucks have only 200 mile range, Where will you REcharge it after that? Tesla semi gets 500 -600 miles, and largest Supercharger network in the country https://electrek.co/2019/08/15/tesla-semi-electric-truck-exceeds-range-expectation-test-driver/ Production takes time Good things come to those who wait I have been for almost 40 years, and still am, involved directly in the freight transportation industry. A 500-600 mile range is not going to cut it for quite a bit of what goes on in trucking. Let's look at a typical OTR trucking scenario. The day is started. The hours of service electronic log gets started also. The driver has 14 hours in which to run 11 hours of actual driving. In the midst of that 14 hours, the driver must log off duty and not move the truck for 30 minutes sometime before the first 8 hours of the 14 lapse. Traffic conditions, road construction, weather all effect how far one can get in that 11 hours. The general rule to gauge timing is to calculate time based on an average of 55 mph. So, 11 hours gets one a total of about 600 miles in one day, on average. Conditions may be such that one may cover more or less. The old days of Smokey and the Bandit are long gone. One starts they day by getting a a load and it must be 560 miles away at a customer by 0700 the next morning. One can do the miles sure enough, but they must take a 10 hour break at the end of the day. If they stop at a place that can charge the semi truck back up, they will not be able to complete the full 10 hours to make the customer by the 0700 appointment time to deliver the load. If the make the run to an area near the customer so they can meet the appointment time, they are not at an area that they are able to charge the truck. So while they can make the delivery, they have no reserve of power to do anything else after they do so. And if one cannot meet the appointment, many customers will force a reschedule to the next day. Typical food store warehouses, Walmart, etc have delivery windows that they are firm on. The typical road driver is paid by the mile. They are not going to sit for 24 hrs just to deliver the next day. And even if they are paid by the hour, a employer is not going to pay $25 or more an hour for a driver to sit 24 hours because of some goofy electric truck. They know these things go on and will not invest in electric trucks. These electric truck, for quite a while, will only be good for local P&D work. They have a considerable way to go to make any inroads into the OTR trucking market. Only when there is reliable onboard charging and the network for fuel (hydrogen fuel being the target fuel of choice by these electric truck makers) is almost as broad as the diesel fuel market is now will electric really come into its own. Very unlikely to happen in what is left of my lifetime. What goes on in Europe is not what goes on in the U.S., and Elon Musk has not a clue of what goes on in the dynamic of day to day trucking environment and logistics. But then, I would never expect him to be up to speed on that as it is not his area of expertise. And the only fleets that are going to take an active interest in using such a product is local P&D outfits like Fedex, UPS, and terminal to terminal fleet operations. And then, only those who are all in on the greenie agenda and play the green card as a perception to the general public. But that local P&D stuff is but a fraction of the total of over 6 million commercial trucks operating in the U.S. But most of the food in this country is not moved by local P&D and the typical package folks. Food, especially produce and meat, is moved primarily by long haul truck. And then it is done quite a bit with team driver trucks that typically run 20+ hours a day. Produce has a time frame or it will start to go bad on the truck. Even if companies could afford 3 times the trucks they now typically keep in inventory to do a switching or pony express sort of thing to keep a load moving cross country, where are the drivers to operate them? Self driving trucks are decades from being able to operate autonomously in every dock or customer property scenario. It will always take a driver to make the final delivery even if the truck does the autonomous stuff cross country. A driver will always need to man the truck. And even then, Electronic Driver Hours of Service is in effect. Where do you propose we get the additional 1 million drivers that would be needed to fill that gap? And relaying trucks, doing a pony express sort of thing, dropping one truck to charge by grabbing a fresh charged truck to continue the run, how do you propose companies come up with the $300-400,000 per truck that would be needed for that sort of thing? Especially factoring that to accomplish this type or scenario, 3 times the number of trucks would need to be purchased by a company to cover that. You think what you buy now is expensive, this would quadruple the average consumer cost in no time for all products. Are you ready for that reality? Again, folks who clamor for these electric trucks have no real clue what is involved in freight logistics in the U.S. and Canada. They have a very limited application. They are a reality but only on a limited scale.
Copperhead 08/17/19 09:35pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

Yep... I'll place my bet on the big cube engine. No bet. I do not place my trust in anything made by an automotive OEM nowadays. Learned quite quickly in the military that even the most elaborate vehicle or weapons system is made by the lowest bidder and can fail at the most inopportune time, so I have a certain cynicism built in to my psyche.. I really hope both Ford and GM have winners on their hands, as that would benefit all of us. But I have been around long enough to know that in today's manufacturing climate, caveat emptor.
Copperhead 08/17/19 09:02pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

https://www.gm-trucks.com/forums/uploads/monthly_2019_06/5cffff9056848_L8TvsL96SAEHPTorque.jpg.09ecd46ae6943e11235a5d6986010343.jpg Here's the power curve of the L8T and L96. Power softens under 2000 rpm. What's crazy? The 7.3 has nearly double the torque of the 6 liter L96 at 1000 rpm! Please repost as I am unable to open whatever graph, chart, whatever you are talking about.
Copperhead 08/17/19 02:28pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

Disagree with what? I disagree with your statement that Fords needs to work more on the 7.3 engine. Ok. I made the comment regarding the power output per liter ratio. I think they could have done better. No... The goal was to design an engine that can handle heavy loads, while running as efficient as possible and be reliable long term while doing it. In the long term, we will see if they got it right.
Copperhead 08/17/19 02:27pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

Yeah, even though I am watching, I am sitting this one out for a while. I never consider a new platform until it has a couple years out i the market and any potential bugs have been worked out and such. I have owned both Fords and GM's. I am not specifically loyal to either brand. Whatever offers me the best value and most reliability at the time, along with features I need, that is where my dollars go.
Copperhead 08/17/19 01:58pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

Disagree with what? I disagree with your statement that Fords needs to work more on the 7.3 engine. Ok. I made the comment regarding the power output per liter ratio. I think they could have done better.
Copperhead 08/17/19 01:34pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

I disagree... I would be willing to bet the new Ford 7.3 will require less rpms to pull a given load compared to GM's new 6.6 engine. The 7.3 flat torque curve is pretty impressive and should make for a very enjoyable towing experience. I do agree... that GM's new 6.6 is a big improvement over their 6.0 engine. Disagree with what? I really didn't touch upon RPM's, as if that even makes a difference. The total output numbers of the new 6.6L L8T engine are 401 HP and 464 Lb. Bumping up close to what the 7.3 is putting out. Only a 11 lb difference in torque. That is not in dispute. That they may differ on the RPM's a little on how they get there is really a non issue. The L8T is intentionally designed to reach peak numbers at a conservative RPM range. It hits peak torque at 4000 RPM and from all indications, like its predecessor the L96 6.0L, it will hit 90% of available torque in the 2100-2500 RPM range. Max HP at 5200 RPM. The 7.3 reaches max torque of 475 lb at the same 4000 RPM, and reaches peak 430 HP at 5500 RPM, 300 RPM higher than the 6.6L L8T. I think your assertion is flatlined.
Copperhead 08/17/19 09:23am Tow Vehicles
RE: Car and Driver octane test

So, did Ford change their recommendation in the owners manual away from premium fuel? Ford has never recommended premium for the base model Ecoboost engines engines but they have for the high output engines in the Raptor, Limited and Lincoln. So have they changed, NO. Do they have various recommendations, YES. See the bottom of the first page in the attachment. Standard Ecoboost on the left, HO version on the right: 2019 F150 specs Didi you happen to notice that link also shows a recommendation of ULSD up to B20 for the EB 2.7? That one is new to me. The EB 2.7 is a diesel engine? Yet in the same column on that motor, it says it is coil over plug design. A diesel with spark plugs? So it makes the entire specs sheet seem suspect regarding fuel recommendation. Also, it shows the 5.0L as a 12:1 compression ratio. The 5.0 has never been a high compression engine. Whomever put that sheet together had no clue what they were doing. What spec sheet are you reading? No where do I read that the 2.7 is a Diesel engine. The 5.0 Coyote V8 does have a 12:1 compression ratio. This information is from the Ford website. My bad. I read too far down the sheet under the column for the 2.7 and didn't realize I was looking at 3.0 diesel info. Also, the 5.0 Coyote in the F150 has a lower compression ratio of 10.5:1. From a wiki on the subject.... A torque-biased variant of the Coyote is produced as an alternative to the EcoBoost V6 in the new F-150 pickup truck. The F150 5.0L receives a lower compression ratio (10.5:1), intake camshafts with less duration, cast iron exhaust manifolds, and revised cylinder heads
Copperhead 08/17/19 07:46am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3L gas power numbers

Ford needs to work on the 7.3 some more. The new GM L8T 6.6L gasser has 401 HP and 464 LB. Within kissing distance of the 7.3 numbers. Either way, I also agree these engines are not overkill. There is a definite market for these. Many folks, especially commercial users which makes up the bulk of the 3/4 and 1 ton market, want a better performance gasser instead of going diesel. Even Fuso is now offering a gasser V8 in their medium duty box trucks to satisfy that desire by their customers. Many of us who are involved in commercial use of trucks do not have all the wild eyed love affair with diesels that many in the personal user community seem to have. I go thru 21,000 gallons of diesel fuel a year simply because I have no other choice in what I am doing but to use diesels. For my personal stuff, I have a preference of a gasser in my 3/4 ton and welcome these new higher output gas engines as a viable alternative to having a diesel. I just saw a video where someone was showing a new 2020 6.6L gasser Chevy 2500 yanking around 12K of trailer and track loader in the high country of Oregon. Was definitely a major improvement over the traditional 6.0L Vortec, and they got the ride for a ballpark $40K off the lot. Compare that to the sticker of a diesel 3/4 ton.
Copperhead 08/17/19 07:22am Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla Semi truck unveil & test ride set for Oct 26th !

Everybody seems to focus on Tesla. Freightliner just delivered the first all electric trucks to Penske last week. Where are the Tesla truck deliveries? While everyone had their eye on Tesla, Freightliner beat them to the party.
Copperhead 08/17/19 07:15am Tow Vehicles
RE: Car and Driver octane test

So, did Ford change their recommendation in the owners manual away from premium fuel? Ford has never recommended premium for the base model Ecoboost engines engines but they have for the high output engines in the Raptor, Limited and Lincoln. So have they changed, NO. Do they have various recommendations, YES. See the bottom of the first page in the attachment. Standard Ecoboost on the left, HO version on the right: 2019 F150 specs Didi you happen to notice that link also shows a recommendation of ULSD up to B20 for the EB 2.7? That one is new to me. The EB 2.7 is a diesel engine? Yet in the same column on that motor, it says it is coil over plug design. A diesel with spark plugs? So it makes the entire specs sheet seem suspect regarding fuel recommendation. Also, it shows the 5.0L as a 12:1 compression ratio. The 5.0 has never been a high compression engine. Whomever put that sheet together had no clue what they were doing.
Copperhead 08/17/19 06:56am Tow Vehicles
RE: front hitch

Yeah, I have a Curt front receiver hitch on my 2015 Chevy 2500.
Copperhead 08/17/19 06:42am Tow Vehicles
RE: Car and Driver octane test

Somehow that manual page forgot to mention that E85 has an octane rating of 100. I have used E85 frequently over the years, and exclusively for the last two years. My 2015 Chevy 2500 runs very well on E85, and my wife 2017 Equinox with the 11.2:1 ratio 2.4 motor really runs great on E85. And even with the lower fuel economy of E85, it is averaging about $.90 to $1 less than premium. And the actual real world MPG results show, on a fuel cost per mile basis, E85 is very competitive to Premium fuel in terms of actual cost per mile and how it performs. Far fewer combustion deposits with E85 and injectors stay cleaner. The air going in to the combustion chamber is more dense because ethanol has a great cooling effect on the air. The air is cooler in the combustion chamber on compression stroke and E85 has a far higher oxygen content in the fuel so these thing lead to a more uniform and complete burn. Talk to the racing and high performance community. Many of them use E85.
Copperhead 08/10/19 11:24pm Tow Vehicles
RE: About to buy a TT, so confused, could use some help.

Your problem is not going to be towing capacity as much as payload. Depending on how your Toyota is optioned, it has a payload between 1,255 and 1,380 lbs... that's including passengers and cargo in the vehicle as well as tongue weight of the trailer. A good WD hitch weighs 100 lbs and the loaded tongue weight of that trailer will be close to 900 lbs. Will you, your family, and anything you put in the Toyota come in under 380 lbs. total? RobAnd air bags don't increase payload Indeed. Many of the 3/4 ton gassers are substantially more capable than the most exotic loaded 1/2 ton, and many times cheaper to boot! The market and pricing is geared toward the 1/2 ton as that is where Dealer and OEM bread and butter is. With the 3/4 and one tons geared more for the commercial sector and priced accordingly. Hence, prices for the 3/4 tons can rival or be lower than many 1/2 tons. Go in acting like a business owner or farmer, instead fo a RV owner, looking for a good 3/4 ton and you can really get substantial discount from the MSRP. Do your research on what you need and go in knowing what you want. For instance, my 2015 Chevy 2500HD 6.0L 4.10 ratio diffs, LT Z71 4x4, double cab standard bed, with snow plow prep package, tow package with integrated controller and 5th wheel/gooseneck prep with a Line-X bedliner thrown in for good measure, Tow capability of 13,000 lb and when the pickup is full of fuel, two people, and a few hundred pounds of gear in the back, it still has about 2300 lb available payload. Still well above the OEM max hitch rating of 1500 lb. Front axle rated at 5200 lb and the rear axle rated for 6200 lb. All for $38,000, brand new, off the lot. And not during one of those high incentive "truck month" sales. Try driving of the lot with a loaded up, max tow, super 1/2 ton whatever for the same price. And even then, with all that souped up 1/2 ton, it still will not match the capability of a average spec'd 3/4 ton. I lowered the back end to take some of the 3/4 ton "cat in heat" rake out of the back, installed SumoSprings 1500 lb cellular urethane foam suspension supports that offer similar performance as air bags but with a far lower cost and none of the hassles. Total cost of about $250. Even with the pickup back end lowered with a set of 2" McGaughy's drop shackles, with well over a ton in the bed the pickup is just getting to to a level stance. But the drop in the back was one of the best investments of $70 that I ever did. Made getting in and out of the bed so much easier for this old beat up ex Armored Cavalry Sergeant. Really no reason that 3/4 ton suspensions should be such that the back end of the pickup truck bed is half way to the moon. the ride of a typical 3/4 ton can be rougher, for sure. I got the inflation tables from BF Goodrich for my AT KO2 tires and run the pressures recommended for the actual axle load a the time. That smoothed up the ride somewhat. I also got rid of the stock Rancho shocks and put on a set of Bilstein 4600's and that brought the pickup almost into 1/2 ton ride quality territory.
Copperhead 08/10/19 08:39am Tow Vehicles
RE: Is a travel trailer with a slide out a good idea for me?

I agree on that. There are some fantastic rear bath units in both slide and no slide versions. But even in the no slide there is some good middle bathrooms. Like the Grey Wolf 25R and 23MK. They are pass thru bathrooms that are just as roomy as rear bath versions.
Copperhead 08/06/19 07:30pm Travel Trailers
RE: Test drove a Chevy 2020 HD 3500

I am waiting for first hand experience from folks about how the new 6.6 gasser does in the 2500HD and 3500HD. From what GM and Ford is doing, I see another round of big bore gasser battles looming on the horizon.
Copperhead 08/05/19 06:21pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Is a travel trailer with a slide out a good idea for me?

Operating slide outs properly and doing basic maintenance on them, especially seals, will mitigate many potential problems. Ask the techs at a dealership shop for advice on using one. No need to fear them. They can be really great.
Copperhead 08/03/19 10:44am Travel Trailers
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