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 > Your search for posts made by 'DallasSteve' found 66 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Chevy, Ford... going into electric trucks.

I'm not sure how trucks will be affected, but I saw a Forbes article a week ago predicting that electric vehicles are on the verge of driving oil companies out of business. They forecast that (in a few years) the cost of oil would have to drop to $10 a barrel to remain competitive with renewable energy. We'll see. Forbes knows more about it than I do.
DallasSteve 09/14/19 09:10pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement

TechWriter You wrote "Unless you have cash to spare, I don't suggest full timing for anyone under 65 who has to purchase their own individual health insurance." How is that any worse than being retired and not yet reached 65 and not living in an RV? Does living in a house or apartment give you some magic solution to health care? I don't think the RV or living in it full time is the problem. If you don't move anywhere, there shouldn't be a difference. In fact you could move to a state with better health care coverage. However, the Kiplinger article was about full timing and moving around: "why not sell the house, buy a recreational vehicle and see the country?" OK, That makes sense. I think what you're saying is really "Unless you have cash to spare, I don't suggest full timing and traveling a lot for anyone under 65 who has to purchase their own individual health insurance." For me (63) I may live in Latin America until 65 and then come back to full time on Medicare (which I hear is still somewhat problematic).
DallasSteve 09/01/19 08:07pm General RVing Issues
RE: Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement

TechWriter You wrote "Unless you have cash to spare, I don't suggest full timing for anyone under 65 who has to purchase their own individual health insurance." How is that any worse than being retired and not yet reached 65 and not living in an RV? Does living in a house or apartment give you some magic solution to health care? I don't think the RV or living in it full time is the problem.
DallasSteve 08/31/19 03:47pm General RVing Issues
RE: Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement

Gibberish 3 Your RV Will Depreciate in Value maybe, maybe not, maybe you did not spend enough to matter. maybe you break even, maybe the depreciation is such a small amount after so many years that it is trivial, maybe you make money when you sell like I always do. You make some valid points, but I don't believe your take on number 3: "maybe you make money when you sell like I always do." Maybe you do, but I am very skeptical. I just don't believe that's a realistic plan. At least not for mere mortals like most of us. By the way, I always get the most beautiful woman and I never have to spend a dime on them. ;)
DallasSteve 08/30/19 11:55am General RVing Issues
RE: Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement

The biggest flaw that I saw (maybe it’s just me) in the article .....was the assumption that retired RV’ers were “full timers” ! All points were valid, and something that should be considered. We as RV’ers know very well, about most/all of the items on the list. But, for someone “not” experienced in the RV picture, need to know these things. RV’s, like boats, are a “money pit”. ....especially, “if” you hire-out all maintenance! For some, the Nomadic, full time, lifestyle ....is perfect. While some are like me.....they can’t give-up the “sticks and bricks”! As “part-timers”, when we have to give-up the RV.....we still have a paid-for home awaiting our return. memtb I plan to go full time for a few years to see the country in retirement. Ultimately I may find a place I like and get back into "sticks and bricks", but I don't want to retire in Dallas. I've said it before: It's a nice place to work, but I wouldn't want to live here. :C When I was a kid it was much better, but Big D has gotten way too big for me.
DallasSteve 08/30/19 09:36am General RVing Issues
RE: Don’t know anything

Dougcox20 Your title is a little frightening. What is your goal? Are you trying to live cheap or do you want to travel around the country or something else? Are you some tech worker who will need fast, reliable Internet to work on the road? Are you aware that if you park an RV in a cold or hot climate you will spend a lot of money to heat or cool it? And RV parks by the night can be more expensive than you might expect. Steve
DallasSteve 08/29/19 01:15pm Travel Trailers
RE: Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement

One other point should be made. The article was about regretting an RV purchase in retirement. If you're only going to use the RV 10 or 20 nights per year it is probably much cheaper to stay in hotels, or rent an RV. But the article talks about using the RV as a home to live in year round and I believe living in hotels year round will be much more expensive. I saw the TV report titled "Greed" from John Stossel about 10 years ago. He interviewed the wealthy owner of a Silicon Valley tech company I had never heard of. He asked the man how much money he had. The man replied "I have enough money that I don't have to spend 2 nights in the same city for the rest of my life, if I don't want to." With an RV I can say the same thing even though I'm not wealthy.
DallasSteve 08/29/19 10:02am General RVing Issues
RE: Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement

$300 per day hotel, $35 for the site. 300 miles 30 gal diesel $90 resturant meal $40, food cos to prepare in MH $15. Get tired before reaching the hotel, pay for another room. MH pull in a lot and get some sleep. The maintenance cost of MH is high. So is air travel and hotels. Stay at the Best Western instead of the 4 Seasons and your numbers might be more believable. I was thinking the same thing. I said up front that hotel + restaurants aren't cheaper if you're taking extended trips like full-timers often do in an RV, but I don't have to use $300 per night hotels to prove that point. There are lots of hotels on the highways for $40 per night, but it adds up and you have to live out of a suitcase.
DallasSteve 08/29/19 09:35am General RVing Issues
Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement

Kiplinger: 13 Reasons You'll Regret An RV In Retirement I saw this article yesterday. There's not much new here. They raise some valid points, but if you can afford an RV and want to travel the country extensively it's probably cheaper than hotels + restaurants (but not by much). Maybe the main plus to living in an RV is you get to take more of your life with you than just what you can pack in an SUV. And if you decide to park it in an RV park to live in it, it's cheaper than an apartment in Dallas. Steve
DallasSteve 08/28/19 10:19am General RVing Issues
RE: Do we or don't we?

Yes your right you don't have to work 5 more years before collecting S.S. at 67 vs early draw that is if you have the funds, but if one does not have enough funds and wants to retire at 62 they can and still earn up to $17,040 a year and still collect the full early/reduced amount before S.S is reduced $1 for every $2 earned over the $17,040 a year. I say work is overrated and one should retire as soon as they can if they can afford it.. Hence why I own a business and work 20 hours or less per week and earn 6 figures per year.. { I am still to young to draw early S.S } I will retire at 62 and collect my early/reduced S.S. full amount and still earn over $100,000 per year without any $$ penalties, ask me how I can do that.. :B Well, I wasn't going to ask, but my guess is that the $100,000 is what the IRS calls "unearned income", meaning it's something like dividends or interest or capital gains. Or maybe you defer the income in your business somehow.
DallasSteve 08/22/19 09:01pm Full-time RVing
RE: News of RV sales down leading indicator to a recession.

I think a recession would be hard on the Indians who brought their families here to take my jobs and forced me into retirement, but it wouldn't be a problem for me. Maybe the prices of new RVs would go down and campgrounds may not be so crowded.
DallasSteve 08/22/19 01:07pm General RVing Issues
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

way2roll You're ignoring the numbers in my complete example when you compare $35K yo $90K to try to make your point. msturtz You spent many years owning towable units. I spent many years as a CPA I'm not going to spend any more time pulling up examples to prove my point. A Class A + Toad is significantly more expensive than a comparable Fifth Wheel + Truck. Believe what you want. Steve
DallasSteve 08/22/19 10:38am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Do we or don't we?

I did have a financial planner tell me to burn through my savings and don't collect SS until (IRC) 72. One minor detail: There's no reason to wait past 70. You max out Social Security at 70. If you want to keep waiting I think they will be happy to keep you money, but I don't think they will later repay you the extra time you wait after 70. Once lost, always lost. :-) Steve
DallasSteve 08/22/19 10:21am Full-time RVing
RE: Sad state of our National Parks-II

But as what's been happening, the administration is boasting strong economy and yet the parks' budget is still getting bigger and bigger cuts. And putting salt to the wound by appointing people who are actually against the agency's missions. And the "non-political" comments from Yosemite Sam continue. https://pearlsofprofundity.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/yosemite-sam-1.jpg height=400 width=800
DallasSteve 08/22/19 09:17am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

The problem is that the listed 5th wheel towable unit is in no way equipped similarly to a Class A. There is a reason for the apparent price difference. For example the motorhomes come with an onboard generator and usually have a large battery bank and inverter. No one is disputing that an inexpensive 5th wheel plus the equivalent of a work truck can be purchased that costs much less than a motorhome however you are not comparing the same things either. Option for option feature for feature. Does the motorhome have an automatic leveling system? Then so should the 5th wheel trailer. I can tell you from personal experience that riding in a work truck and riding in any motorhome is not equivalent either. Nor is the fuel range equivalent either without aftermarket additional tanks which I added to my setup. The F350 gas may only have a 40 gallon fuel tank at most the motorhome has a 80 gallon fuel tank. I know about these limitations because I lived it. I used to have to carry many gas cans with me till I installed the auxiliary fuel tank. Again in any comparison it is important to consider all the facts. Since I have built a great towable setup before we got our motorhome I am acutely aware of the difference in features between both platforms. Bottom line is that it depends on the individual requirements of the person using the equipment. I have a CDL and work for a heavy truck manufacturer I look at an RV like any other tool. I try to determine what our requirements are first and then look for most logical solution that fits within the budget. I did a cursory check for 5th wheels on RV trader equipped with generators and residential refrigerators and the discounted prices start at about $90k. I am assuming that they have automatic leveling systems. I think you're "moving the goalposts". I don't see a residential fridge in the $90K class A units I searched so they are comparable to the fivers. Do they have generators? Probably. Does that close the $40K difference in my example? Hardly. I agree with Lantley's post. If you trick out the fiver, and you trick out the class A, it's still much more expensive.
DallasSteve 08/22/19 08:59am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

way2roll I did a comparable search on RV Trader. I looked at new Forest River products to keep them comparable. I looked at about 35 feet long. I'm looking at gas, not diesel on both a motorhome and a tow vehicle. I see Class A motorhomes starting about $90,000. I see new 5th wheels starting about $35,000. As Don Henley says "Are you with me so far?" I looked at new gas Ford F350 DRW. That should be plenty of truck. NADA says they run about $40,000. True or false? I don't know. I suppose you can spend $75,000 on a King Ranch F350, but all of this is targeting economical and comparable. I'll figure a new economical toad, not a Jeep; say about $25,000. Here's how my numbers look. $90,000 Class A $25,000 Toad $115,000 Total $35,000 Fifth wheel $40,000 Ford F350 $75,000 Total I doubt there is $40,000 of "fudge" in my quick and dirty numbers. Steve
DallasSteve 08/21/19 08:04pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Do we or don't we?

X2 The S.S break even age is around 77-78 years of age, so if a person starts drawing at 62 and another starts at 67 they both will earn the same total amount by 77-78 years of age but the person drawing at 67 has to work 5 more years.. "the person drawing at 67 has to work 5 more years.. " Why? There's no law that says you have to work until you start drawing SS. There's also no law that says you have to start drawing SS when you stop working. I'm 63. I stopped working 12 months ago. I'm living on what some people call "my savings". They haven't arrested me for that, yet. You are correct that the breakeven age is around 77-78. If I die early and I leave money on the table, so what? (So far I'm in good health) I've also seen statistics that the sooner you retire, the longer you live. I can't explain that. Steve
DallasSteve 08/21/19 07:50pm Full-time RVing
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

I agree to disagree. I agree; we disagree. It appears to me that you want to compare a fiver + truck to a Class A with no toad. A big Class A with no toad is not much more practical for vacations or fulltiming than a fiver with no truck. Add a toad that is comparable in comfort, quality, and age to your large truck and the Class A (all things being equal) costs more. When I say "all things being equal" I mean comparable age, size, quality, and features of the 2 RVs. If you're going to high end fivers, they start at maybe $100,000. If you're going to high end Class A it's maybe 2 or 3 times that much, to start. Sure, you can buy a cheap, smallish Thor or Forest River, but I say that's not comparable to a big, studly fiver. Steve
DallasSteve 08/21/19 05:57pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

Class A is maybe the most comfortable for traveling and surely the most expensive to buy.. I have to disagree. Lots of Mh's on the market much cheaper than a comparable Fiver and the truck to pull it. I've seen just the trucks big enough to pull a fiver with a higher sticker price than some brand new entry level Class A's. That's not counting the price of the trailer. Trucks have become insanely expensive. Comparing apples to apples a Class A is more expensive than a fiver. If you compare an old gas Class A with no toad or an old beat up old toad to a new fiver with a new diesel truck, then it will be cheaper, but that's not apples to apples. A Class A needs a toad to get around. Or you can compare a small Class A to a huge fiver and you win, but again that's not apples to apples. I knew somebody would argue the point, but I stand by my observation.
DallasSteve 08/21/19 10:20am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

Class A is maybe the most comfortable for traveling and surely the most expensive to buy. There are your pros and cons in a nutshell. I've bought 20 year old houses before. They needed a lot of work. A 20 year old house on wheels will need even more work. If you can tolerate that pain point then it can be a way to save money, but repairs will cost money, too.
DallasSteve 08/21/19 09:11am Class A Motorhomes
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