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 > Your search for posts made by 'Durb' found 126 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: how starlink works (highly technical)

Wow!
Durb 09/02/22 09:34am Technology Corner
RE: Best Hitch

It appears the award for "Best Hitch" has been given to the B&W Companion. I'm late to this thread (been camping), but I would like to nominate the Trailer Saver TS3 which I own. - The Companion is made in USA, so is the Trailer Saver. - The Companion uses heavy gauge steel, the TS3 is heavier, 1/4" plate with 3/4" solid steel risers. - The Companion has thick jaws, those on the TS3 are thicker. - The TS3 dissipates bouncing forces, the Companion doesn't. - Due to the high hinge design, the TS3 dissipates chucking forces, the Companion doesn't. - During panic braking, the TS3 causes the front of the trailer to push down loading the rear truck tires, a safety feature. - The comfortable tow of the TS3 reduces driver fatigue, a safety feature. - Shock mitigation of the TS3 protects the trailer's frame and the truck's electronics. The Companion doesn't do this. The Companion is a good hitch, the TS3 just does so much more. In a "Best Hitch" competition, B&W would rank below Trailer Saver, Road master Comfort Ride, and Air Safe hitches. Due to the high prices, we just don't have as many fanboys. What kind of maintenance does the TS3 need? What are the failure points...airbags? Which one is easier to remove? Which one cost less? Which one has better customer support? Maintenance - Zerk fittings for the pivot rod similar to the need to grease the rubber donuts on the Companion. Failure points - Don't know, never had a failure in six years. Easier to remove - Based on this Criterium, the lightest hitch would then be the best hitch. "Best Hitch" was the question. Cost - You get what you pay for. Pay less - get less. Customer support - Don't know, never needed to call customer support. My guess is if you are calling customer support, you have problems.
Durb 09/01/22 08:02am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Best Hitch

It appears the award for "Best Hitch" has been given to the B&W Companion. I'm late to this thread (been camping), but I would like to nominate the Trailer Saver TS3 which I own. - The Companion is made in USA, so is the Trailer Saver. - The Companion uses heavy gauge steel, the TS3 is heavier, 1/4" plate with 3/4" solid steel risers. - The Companion has thick jaws, those on the TS3 are thicker. - The TS3 dissipates bouncing forces, the Companion doesn't. - Due to the high hinge design, the TS3 dissipates chucking forces, the Companion doesn't. - During panic braking, the TS3 causes the front of the trailer to push down loading the rear truck tires, a safety feature. - The comfortable tow of the TS3 reduces driver fatigue, a safety feature. - Shock mitigation of the TS3 protects the trailer's frame and the truck's electronics. The Companion doesn't do this. The Companion is a good hitch, the TS3 just does so much more. In a "Best Hitch" competition, B&W would rank below Trailer Saver, Road master Comfort Ride, and Air Safe hitches. Due to the high prices, we just don't have as many fanboys.
Durb 08/31/22 08:52pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Trailersavor vs Anderson Ultimate

In my opinion, both the AUH and a Trailer Saver hitch are quality products and will get your trailer to your destination. They each have their upsides and downsides such as cost, weight, installation, hook-up methods and so forth which the OP will have to judge the importance of on his own. One thing that is evident is the Andersen hitch is a solid hook up between the trailer's pin box and the truck's frame; no give. The Trailer Saver incorporates a soft joint. In terms of towing comfort and gear protection, Trailer Saver wins hands down.
Durb 08/30/22 11:06am Fifth-Wheels
RE: The best upgrade for your TT

When in the market for new trailer tires, I started a thread on a forum asking the question: Other than longevity, what should I be looking for in a trailer tire, better traction, easier scrubbing, more resistant to side loads, better braking performance, puncture resistance, etc.? Not a single response touting a tire's features or performance. I ended up with Endurance tires and they tow no differently than the previous Towmax tires. I can say the shallow tread depth of the Endurance tires may contribute to less squirm, but I can't tell from the truck.
Durb 08/14/22 03:49pm Travel Trailers
RE: New to 5th wheels

In many states you will need safety chains for your Goosebox unless you have already planned for them. An additional bed plug for your umbilical cord is handy, but not mandatory. A secure hold for your breakaway cable will be needed as your only truck hold is the gooseneck ball. Accommodations for all the big stuff you put under the canopy of your truck like bicycles and ladders might be necessary. A new checklist telling you to close your tailgate!!!
Durb 08/08/22 02:55pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: tire wrench

Your fifth wheel is relatively light, so 1/2"-20 studs. To answer your question: 13/16", 6 point deep chrome socket, 1/2" x 6" extension, and 1/2" x 18" long breaker bar. I use a 16" long ratchet on mine and it works fine.
Durb 08/07/22 11:30am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Need help from experienced woodworker

Oak is an open grain hardwood. The first coat of an oil stain will pretty much determine the color. Additional coats will add some depth but not change the color much. A different colored stain may be required. Stains should always be tested in an obscured area. In my experience, trying to match a piece by staining is difficult. When the manufacturer finished the wood, they sealed it. Surface sanding may give the appearance of bare wood, but it still might be sealed and not accept stain as readily. You might try treating it with a liquid paint remover. Then sand, and try again as mentioned in your other forum.
Durb 08/07/22 11:13am Fifth-Wheels
RE: EV's need gas too - Tow with a Tesla?

Hmmm. Tesla has released a tow package for the Model 3 shown here. The maximum tow weight is 2,000# and max tongue weight is 220#. The lightest RPod made weighs 2,714 dry and most likely has a tongue weight of over 300#. Tesla 3s can tow teardrop trailers and that is about all. Maybe overloading his vehicle caused him to have greatly reduced range creating the need for a roadside charge. I wonder where he hauled the generators and gas can. Is that a model 3 or model Y. Hard to tell. If it’s a model Y then his towing capacity is 3500 lbs and max tounge weight is 350 pounds. Hard to tell from the pic though. I’ll look at it on the PC tomorrow. No idea on the weight of the trailer. But still no reason for a roadside charge. We have travelled that highway pulling a trailer. There are at least a half dozen charge opportunities. There is something else going on here. Could be a Y. An X has central door handles on the rear doors. He could probably squeak under the tow rating, but would be pushing the tongue weight. Toting a couple of generators and extra fuel isn't going to help with the numbers.
Durb 07/29/22 05:12pm Tow Vehicles
RE: EV's need gas too - Tow with a Tesla?

Hmmm. Tesla has released a tow package for the Model 3 shown here. The maximum tow weight is 2,000# and max tongue weight is 220#. The lightest RPod made weighs 2,714 dry and most likely has a tongue weight of over 300#. Tesla 3s can tow teardrop trailers and that is about all. Maybe overloading his vehicle caused him to have greatly reduced range creating the need for a roadside charge. I wonder where he hauled the generators and gas can.
Durb 07/29/22 03:24pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Fifth wheel mileage question

Weight matters. Getting an extra two and half tons moving in stop and go traffic requires a lot of energy or fuel. Pulling an extra 5,000# up a hill also takes a lot of juice. Weight also matters when it comes to stopping your rig as retarding all that extra momentum will create a lot of heat energy which needs to be replaced as fuel. I always strive to always keep my weight down as much as possible by loading lightly and leaving unneeded stuff at home. Lighter rigs are easier on your truck's drive line components and will result in fuel savings. Whether the savings are that important to you is something you will have to decide. I'm of the opinion that blaming aerodynamics as the major source of poor fuel economy is a rationalization for towing heavy.
Durb 07/28/22 03:01pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Camping in an EV.... Always charging...

More comments: Who goes camping without an ice chest, cook stove, bags of food, or a lawn chair? Also, there were plenty of external driving shots of the truck which suggests a support vehicle (maybe with a generator) and a crew. My guess is they all stayed in motels, which from my point of view, says nothing about the truck and its capabilities. A separate post on this forum shows I was right about some of my speculations: They do have a crew and an F150 hybrid traveling with them. The external driving shots was an easy giveaway. I guessed on the generator. Apparently, they tried to charge the Lightning with the on board generator in the hybrid. I'm speculating here they stowed their essential camping gear in the hybrid to keep the BEV lighter. Not really up and up as far as I am concerned. As far as the motels go; I'm sticking with it.
Durb 07/27/22 06:03pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Camping in an EV.... Always charging...

More comments: Who goes camping without an ice chest, cook stove, bags of food, or a lawn chair? Also, there were plenty of external driving shots of the truck which suggests a support vehicle (maybe with a generator) and a crew. My guess is they all stayed in motels, which from my point of view, says nothing about the truck and its capabilities.
Durb 07/24/22 03:54pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Anderson Camper Levelers

They work great, but will slip on some surfaces so use the rubber pad which fixes the problem. I did have one break on asphalt (10,500# trailer). I emailed them a picture of the broken unit and Andersen sent out a new one swiftly. I did try a different brand off Amazon as it looked heavier duty and came with a carry case. The ramp angle on it was too steep and the trucks e-brake wouldn't hold on it to get the chocks in. The smooth radius on the Andersens is a better design than the Amazon product. Some complain they interfere with chocking their tires. I use Rotochocks so it isn't an issue for me.
Durb 07/23/22 03:55pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Camping in an EV.... Always charging...

Some rudimentary math: He drove 1,100 miles and averaged 1.8 miles/kwh; so 611 kwh of energy used. The one charging event he showed took 37 minutes for 60 kwh of energy or 1.62 kwh/minute This translates to 377 minutes of charge time, or 6 hours, 17 minutes for a 1,100 mile trip. Not including the drive time to get to the multiple charging stations. His aerodynamics might have been better served if unstrapped the shovel from the side of the camper. I really didn't think the thousand pounds of weight add was out of line. There is a part of me that wants to own that truck, but not for long trips. It was a nice video to show off the Northwest.
Durb 07/23/22 10:55am Tow Vehicles
RE: AC air not cold

I have a 31 ft' fifth wheel. The air conditioner was installed incorrectly at the factory. They left the divider off that separated the input and output air so it just churned and didn't cool. Made a makeshift divider and fixed that problem so now the air conditioner works fine. You might want to remove the inner panel to make sure you have good separation with no lair leaks between chambers. Our trailer has a bunch of windows. If is going to be hot, we have to start the air when it is still cool outside to give it a fighting chance, blinds down. Involves some sweater time in the morning. We're in the northwest so it always cools down at night and we never sleep with the air on. You might want to disregard this if it stays hot all the time where you are. We also had a Bigfoot trailer with a 22 ft. box, dual pane windows and very good insulation. I figured one could make ice cubes on the counter with the air conditioning in there if they wanted to.
Durb 07/22/22 01:19pm General RVing Issues
RE: 2006 Bigfoot 25C9.4LB Camper Wet Weight Label - Even Close?

I purchased a 2004 Bigfoot trailer used; one reason being the light published weight. Inside the trailer was a build sheet with options and the related weight gains. They added 1.4 pounds for a bedspread, plus charged weight for the windows, entry step, stove cover and a dozen of other "options" that should have been standard with the trailer. Net result was an additional 500 pounds. I was still very happy with the trailer. Hi Durb, Are you saying it was 500lbs over the brochure dry weight or over the wet weight label in the trailer? What's weird is the brochure gives a dry weight slightly under the wet weigh before options (2435 dry/2335 wet/2654 wet with options.) But for this particular camper, there are options/features it doesn't have. Another minor issue is that BF brochures don't list a year anywhere so it's a guess if this is the right year. There is a tiny BFM 06 R1 on the last page that makes me think it is 2006. Will BF tell me they pulled the wet weight out of their ***? We will see. Yes, I suspect there are "hidden" weights not accounted for anywhere. But hey, why not ask rather than speculate. If only got about about 650lbs of tire to me wrong with. Terry The brochure weight was 4,800# dry. The trailer came in at 5,300# fully documented with an itemized certificate from Bigfoot. I don't recall seeing a weight sticker on that trailer. No big deal on a travel trailer; I towed it at around 6,000#.
Durb 07/22/22 10:27am Truck Campers
RE: 2006 Bigfoot 25C9.4LB Camper Wet Weight Label - Even Close?

I purchased a 2004 Bigfoot trailer used; one reason being the light published weight. Inside the trailer was a build sheet with options and the related weight gains. They added 1.4 pounds for a bedspread, plus charged weight for the windows, entry step, stove cover and a dozen of other "options" that should have been standard with the trailer. Net result was an additional 500 pounds. I was still very happy with the trailer.
Durb 07/22/22 08:25am Truck Campers
RE: 16' Scamp and 2018 Ram 2500 diesel

I towed a flatbed trailer with a SeaDoo, maybe 1,000 pounds total on a long haul for a houseboat trip. Still cost me 3 miles per gallon, 21 to 18 MPG. The truck had lots of stuff in the bed and there were plenty of grades. The best my 5.9 Cummins has ever seen is 24 MPG, flat freeway, no wind, empty bed except for auxiliary tank. My truck's sweet spot is 63-65 MPH in OD.
Durb 07/21/22 10:17pm Travel Trailers
RE: Portable Hitches

Based on your needs, I would have a B&W turnover ball system installed on your truck. This would allow easy removal of a bed mounted Gooseneck ball. There are a number of fifth wheel hitches that will mount utilizing the ball. Examples are, B&W Companion, Andersen Ultimate, and the Goose Box which is a pin box that mounts on the trailer. On a 2006 truck, your other option is to install universal rails which might interfere with your camper usage. Virtually any hitch will work with the weight range you cited. Every hitch has its pros and cons, such as weight, cost, mounting method, hook up method, short bed adaptability, and towing comfort.
Durb 07/15/22 07:55am Fifth-Wheels
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