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 > Your search for posts made by 'FloridaRosebud' found 83 matches.

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RE: Sold our Vegas 24.1 and now looking bigger

The downside to an LP genset is that they require LP of course and the LP tanks are smaller than typical gensets that run on the same fuel the coach uses. So you have to find spots to fill up your LP more often than what a typical Rv uses LP. With a genset that runs on your coach's fuel, it's taken care of when you fill up normally. Nothing wrong with them mechanically but personally I wouldn't have one due to the hassle of filling LP more often with less capacity. +1 on this.... Al
FloridaRosebud 03/17/20 10:23am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

I have good news! I just saved a bunch of money on my car insurance by switching to .... Oh, never mind. I didn't switch anything. Lol. The good news is, I made some extra money today, that I can use towards the motor home. The bad news, is.... By the time I got done with some unexpected computer service calls, it was too late to do anything. UGH! !@#$%^&*() Lol. Oh well, tomorrow is another day. I did however, do a little additional research on rv refer cooling. I have read about a number of people who have had cooling issues with their rv refer, and added a fan or a couple of fans, and the cooling was drastically better. The air was either pushed or drawn across the cooling fins at the top of the unit. One person's refer inside temp was approaching 60 degrees. Upon adding a couple of fans to pull air across the cooling fins, the temp dropped to about 40 inside. This was in outside air temperatures in excess of 90 degrees. This particular unit had the refer in a slide out, and there was no roof vent for the refer. The fridge was vented from the lower portion of the wall, and at the top of the wall. As I said, once the fans were added, big difference. So, it would appear that as long as there is sufficient airflow across the cooling fins, the refer will work quite well. I guess I'll just have to test it out. Yep, I bought one of those $15 small fans through Amazon and put it in the refer. Was about 4" square, so it didn't take up a lot of room. It helped lower the temp from the low 40s to about 36-37 degrees. Didn't help the freezer so that's when we opted for a residential unit and did the swap out. Al
FloridaRosebud 03/04/20 03:40am Class A Motorhomes
RE: UpDate : Koni FSD Shocks

I'm real interested on how this works out for you. I've been thinking of doing the same thing as my Bilsteins ride pretty "stiff". I would like to soften the ride up some so things like expansion joint aren't as jarring. Al
FloridaRosebud 02/27/20 03:42am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

We found the residential I mentioned is 25% larger for the same install space, which for us was a huge selling point. Might not be for you. This one pulls 3 amps @120V, so it would pull 30 amps @12V. Might be too much for boondocking... Al I've looked at that and it seems to be fairly energy efficient. The extra size would be nice. We have a bottom freezer refer in the house, and really like that style. So far, all of those seem to use more energy than the top freezer models. Have you checked on what the daily use of electric is with something like a Kill-A-Watt meter on that model? You know, I have not. I never thought about is as we really don't boondock much, and when we do I've got my Genny running. I might look into that since it would be good info to know. Al
FloridaRosebud 02/21/20 06:53pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

Now, you will also notice that this is an installation with just a roof vent, and no fans. It's just a natural airflow with no assistance. Now think of opening the roof vent in most any rv. No fan running, maybe a window or 2 open. There is no breeze outside to help push air around. You will get a natural flow of hot air out the top. Now, turn on the powered fan in the ceiling. BIG difference in the amount of air flow. That is why sometimes you will see people who have trouble keeping their refer cool in summer in hot areas, will add a fan towards the bottom or middle of the refer in the rear, which helps with air flow, and succeeds with cooling the refer better. That is based on the experience of others, not mine. As such, my view was, IF I DO THIS, to enclose the rear with thin aluminum, seal both the sides, and bring air in from near the bottom, so the air has no choice but to go through the fins. With fans running, that would provide way more cooling effect than just having natural air flow. This drawing would be an enclosed box on top of the refer. So, all of the cooling area would be enclosed from near the bottom of the rear of the refer, all the way to the exit area at the back wall. http://paddleupstream.com/mohorebuild/refercooling4.jpg Now, the cooling fins on our refer are 4" x 4" and nearly 24" wide. So, 4 x 24 = 96 sq inches. That means in order to get proper cooling, that 4 x 24 must run all the way to the rear wall, with no way for other air to enter the system. If everything is sealed to the refer, all the way to the rear wall, it has no choice but to cool those fins. Yes, those are red channels from the rear of the refer to the rear wall. That's my story and I'm sticking with it. Or as my dad used to say, "unless something better comes along". Lol. Anyhow, this is just what I was thinking about, but that is not set in stone, so I may change my mind and use a residential refer instead, which requires no venting. That would be a lot simpler. Time will tell. We found the residential I mentioned is 25% larger for the same install space, which for us was a huge selling point. Might not be for you. This one pulls 3 amps @120V, so it would pull 30 amps @12V. Might be too much for boondocking... Al
FloridaRosebud 02/21/20 02:23am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

There are several ways of dealing with air movement. I have an installation guide on rv refers. It appears that the main issue is airflow along the back side of the refer. Mine has the heating pipe on the right side, looking at it from the rear. From the research I've done, if there is too much airspace between the back of the fins and pipes at the rear, the air won't move through them properly, and actually flows behind them, and it won't cool properly. A residential refer would also solve the problem. Danfoss also makes a dc compressor, and there is a place in Indiana that uses their compressor, and makes a unit to replace the original rv cooling system, which then makes it strictly a dc powered refer using normal refrigerant. I haven't called them yet, so I don't know what pricing is. I am guessing a residential refer may be cheaper, and some of those are fairly energy efficient. That would also solve the venting issue as well, as suggested. You may be thinking about conversion units by JC Refrigeration. If I remember correctly, they are a bit pricey. You can pick up a smaller counter depth residential for less, but if you dry camp a lot you’ll want a few more batteries, an inverter and generator to keep things running. Here is the link to JC Refrigeration - Link I got a verbal quote from them for $750 for the kit. I don't believe that included installation. So we ended up with a 10 cubic foot residential unit that fit perfectly in the hole. Cost for it was $575 at Home Depot, and they delivered to our RV shop in Melbourne, FL. It fit through the door without any issues. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Frigidaire-10-1-cu-ft-Top-Freezer-Refrigerator-in-Brushed-Steel-ENERGY-STAR-FFET1022UV/307293266 We got it in white... Al
FloridaRosebud 02/20/20 03:43am Class A Motorhomes
RE: LEDs Replacement for Flourscent

For my 12" florescent fixtures, I cut the wires to the ballasts and wired directly to the 12" COB LED Daytime Driving lights shown here for just over $2/each when purchased as shown. The work perfect and give more light than the old tube while using a lot less power. The strips have 3M backing tape for mounting. Just need some tiny wire nuts to connect the wires. https://www.amazon.com/Universal-Waterproof-Trucks-Daytime-Running/dp/B071PFC1H2 https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/610TaVpuKZL._SL1050_.jpg height=500 You don't need to spend a lot of money or make it hard on yourself when using these lights. I had longer fixtures that took 4 of these with ease. I swapped them out a couple of years ago and they're still working great. I'll admit having a few failed on other rigs I installed them in but for the price, you can't beat these lights. I just ordered 3 sets for my rig. Thanks for the tip!! Al
FloridaRosebud 02/16/20 03:42am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Fleetwood Storm quality

It is their entry model and in my opinion . . . JUNK . . . Don't waste your money. Actually the FR3 is their entry level model, but yes it's on their lower end. The rest of your comment isn't really helpful, especially coming from a DP owner. To the OP, you just need to have realistic expectations. Class B's usually have better quality than most gas class A's. But cost per square foot is also considerably more. In short, Class A's - as most things - you get what you pay for. If you want to spend less on a lower end model just have realistic expectations about what you are getting for your dollar. Most people on here are into brand bashing but at the level you are talking, one manufacturer is as good as another in that space. Hence your findings on complaints are pretty consistent across all brands. "Quality' is hard to come by in the RV world to begin with, let alone at the gasser, lower end scale. It does not matter if my comment was helpful or not. It was my opinion and I was expressing it. The FR3 is a Forest river, not a Fleetwood. Unless I'm missing something.... Al
FloridaRosebud 02/03/20 08:11pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: HOV Lanes in Atlanta GA

Be aware that some places (don't know about Atlanta) have cameras and will snap your plate and send you a bill or fine. Happened to me in TN, and we have the cameras here in Florida.... Al
FloridaRosebud 01/27/20 09:56am Roads and Routes
RE: Increasing towing capacity

What we are talking about here is strengthening the coach frame and adding a receiver. We don't need to be PE's to know how to increase that. In fact look next any RV, MH or Trailer and you can see that what the manuf designed is questionable. If I add extra supports or fish plates at is not going to cause a failure. Now if we were saying to install a class III receiver and tow 10k lbs with it then yes that's a problem. Or if someone installs smaller brakes than what was designed. Again, that's not the point. I agree with you that what some manufacturers do looks questionable. I understand that welding more strength into something might help. My point is it's still a modification over what was tested and approved, and if for some reason it were to fail, and trust me, things that you wouldn't think would never fail sometimes do, whomever did or asked for the modification would be held liable. That's the way our legal system works. You or I might not like it, but that's the way things are now. Al
FloridaRosebud 01/25/20 03:41pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Increasing towing capacity

The beautiful thing about weight and length posts is if they run long enough, sooner or later someone will post what you want to hear and you can go for it! After all you can always tell the court, you got it approved from RV.net. :B Dennis, are you an Engineer or Lawyer or both? It would be very informative if you can show us some laws against beefing up a frame and receiver. Then from an Engineers standpoint, tell us why we can't perform these mods. Richard Mechanic. Cars Operating Engineer. Commercial Bakery Chief Engineer. Ink production. RV repair. Owner, Operator. Still tinker around with what ever is broke. OK, let me jump in here as an Engineer (PE) who works for a forensic company and am a manager of other Engineers. Most of my work is legal in nature, IOW lawsuits. If you, as an owner, modify a design, and in this case "beefing up" the frame and receiver would be a modification of the design, you had better have it signed and sealed by a PE or approved by the jurisdiction that covers motor homes. If you don't and there is an injury or death as a result of what you modified you can bet there will be a lawsuit. I deal with this type of stuff every day. Bubba adds to a deck and it falls down, Bubba adds circuits to his house and it burns down, and Bubba is towing a load too heavy for the truck and it overturns. The insurance companies hire us to investigate and get to the root cause of the problem. If you are liable (if YOU are the root cause) the Attorneys jump in. If someone is willing to take a chance then that's their choice, but one does it at their own risk. That's the real world now. You can certainly look me up to confirm what my company does: www.edtengineers.com. Al Rose, P.E. I have worked in the trades my whole life, without review of a PE, and I've see what Bubba does but not all of us are Bubbas. It sounds like you are saying that none of us without a PE have a clue what we are doing. I did say to take the coach to a qualified weld shop, in a earlier post. What you advocate would not allow any of us to make any kind of fix or modification to any thing without oversight. That would be an impairment on my rights. Richard Your rights do not allow you to do things that could hurt other people. It's called laws. I'm sorry, but you missed my point. I was not implying that anyone was a Bubba specifically, but I was just telling you what the LAW and codes requires, and if you break or ignore either that could result in serious consequences. Just taking your coach to a "qualified" weld shop doesn't mean that it's legal for them to make any modification you want. A modification to something like a truck or RV frame without testing to insure and certify it will carry/tow what someone SAYS it will is reckless and you would certainly be liable. Again, myself and my guys deal with this type of stuff every day and we are required to know the laws and codes in each state, or at least know where to go and find/research them. I'm sorry if the facts get in the way of your opinion, but this is the world we live in. Al
FloridaRosebud 01/25/20 12:19pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: The Verdic is in, New Ford 7.3 V-8 Gas mpg not so Great

Why would anyone expect an engine, although newer, with 2 less cylinders but a larger displacement, to get noticeably better fuel efficiency? Especially so in something with the aerodynamics of a brick like a heavy motorhome. No such thing as a free lunch. Yeah, that was kind of my thought as well. I had a chevy 454 in a 3500 Savanna Van back a few years ago, and my gas mileage never was above 10mpg. It went down to 7-8 when I was towing my 12,000 pound trailer. There is no free lunch. As someone in an earlier post said, good gas mileage and RV should never be used in the same sentence. Al
FloridaRosebud 01/24/20 04:19am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Increasing towing capacity

The beautiful thing about weight and length posts is if they run long enough, sooner or later someone will post what you want to hear and you can go for it! After all you can always tell the court, you got it approved from RV.net. :B Dennis, are you an Engineer or Lawyer or both? It would be very informative if you can show us some laws against beefing up a frame and receiver. Then from an Engineers standpoint, tell us why we can't perform these mods. Richard Mechanic. Cars Operating Engineer. Commercial Bakery Chief Engineer. Ink production. RV repair. Owner, Operator. Still tinker around with what ever is broke. OK, let me jump in here as an Engineer (PE) who works for a forensic company and am a manager of other Engineers. Most of my work is legal in nature, IOW lawsuits. If you, as an owner, modify a design, and in this case "beefing up" the frame and receiver would be a modification of the design, you had better have it signed and sealed by a PE or approved by the jurisdiction that covers motor homes. If you don't and there is an injury or death as a result of what you modified you can bet there will be a lawsuit. I deal with this type of stuff every day. Bubba adds to a deck and it falls down, Bubba adds circuits to his house and it burns down, and Bubba is towing a load too heavy for the truck and it overturns. The insurance companies hire us to investigate and get to the root cause of the problem. If you are liable (if YOU are the root cause) the Attorneys jump in. If someone is willing to take a chance then that's their choice, but one does it at their own risk. That's the real world now. You can certainly look me up to confirm what my company does: www.edtengineers.com. Al Rose, P.E.
FloridaRosebud 01/23/20 11:19am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Increasing towing capacity

I have a 1998 Fleetwood Bounder 34V it says gross towing weight is 3500 pounds I have a 4000 pound Jeep I want to tow how can i Increase my towing capacity. My GCWR is 23500 pounds, motor home dry weight (UVW) including fuel is 17250, carrying capacity is 2750 pounds towing capacity is 3500 pounds totaling 23500 pounds. Are there any suggestions on how to increase my towing capacity. Towing four down adds only the weight of the hitch and none of the Jeep weight to the weigh bearing factor of the receiver. If the motorhome frame extensions are properly fabricated to the factory frame and the receiver is rated for 5,000 lbs. towing weight, what would be the problem? The chassis should not be a problem if it is well maintained. Take your titles and registration to your local DMV licensee division and ask them if you can legally tow the Jeep behind the motor home. Um, no, that's not exactly true. When pulling from a dead stop the receiver and frame will see the full weight of what is attached to it. In addition, the transmission is also rated for the design weights, so increasing over those design weights will add additional stress to the transmission. Sure, many may get away with it, but I sure would not be one to chance it. Al
FloridaRosebud 01/21/20 07:52pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Kirkland motor oil

Although the ambulance chasers are using the marketing of "obsolete" oil next to current standards as deceptive, in NM they did test the oils and discover the emissions control systems on many modern vehicles using the obsolete oil did cause problems with the emissions controls and may have damaged certain sensors. The long term effects are not know simply because there is no way to go back and test what had happen as nobody can say for sure what they sued last year or the year before. So, it's all based on what can be tested now. It still does not do away with the fact that it was a frivolous lawsuit as supposedly the oil in question was clearly marked with the grade and other language, like not made for most engines made after 1930 er duh. The ambulance chasers mentioned fine print and being on the shelf beside oil that had a higher spec. Fine print my rear end. All legalized extortion and DG will settle as that will be the cheaper route, the class will get a Dollar General gift card worth $2.00, and the ambulance chasers will get millions. It's the oil you want to use in the B&S powered lawnmower you bought for $89 in 1990, that burns a pint while cutting your 1/8 acre lot, not what you want to put in your 2020 Ford F-150 LOL. It's not unlike the McDonald's coffee foolishness. Sure its hot, it's coffee. Just because your an idiot and spill it on your hoohaa, that should not give you the right to perform legalized extortion. I digress. Well digressing as well, she lost the lawsuit in appeal, so McDonald's did not pay. Al
FloridaRosebud 01/20/20 04:01pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: 5 figure 30 foot

My 2 cents might not be worth it, but we bought a 2006 National Seabreeze. We also were at the Tampa shows this year (camped for 2 nights) and there was not a class A that even interested myself or my wife under $150k. The Nationals, while out of business since 2008, are very solid motorhomes. (Also someone mentioned Safari - another great MH) We've had ours 2 years, put on 11,000 miles, and no issues to speak of. What you save in cost by buying a 10-12 year old gasser you can use for repairs and upgrades. We are very happy. Oh, and it's 33.5 foot with 2 slides. (OK, maybe this was just worth 1 cent....) Al
FloridaRosebud 01/20/20 03:57pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Bluetooth Dashboard speaker

We use a JBL Flip 4. Sounds OK, and plenty loud enough. I've thought about getting a Flip 5, which is larger still. We also use it outside as well. Al
FloridaRosebud 01/17/20 02:56am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

All joking about dragster engines aside, you should crank that engine over as soon as possible. But do a few things first. Pull all the spark plugs and get one of those USB or WiFi inspection cameras (about $15 online) and have a look into each cylinder to see what it looks like. A little bit of rust probably won't hurt anything. But if it looks crusty with big flakes of rust you could be in for big trouble. With light or no rust, just get a can of fogging oil spray from your local auto parts store and give a good shot into each cylinder. Let It sit for 30 minutes or so to soak in around the top ring, then try to crank it over with the plugs out. If you see heavy rust, dose the cylinders heavily with PBBlaster or similar and let it sit for a day or two. Do not crank it over. Use compressed air to blow the gunk out of the cylinder. Hit it with PBBlaster again and repeat the procedure. Only when you are no longer blowing out crud should you attempt to crank it over. You might want to try turning it with a ratchet on the crank pulley rather than stressing the starter if the engine is partially or fully seized. Obviously it will need an oil change before you run it for any length of time. Once it is running, change the oil again after an hour or so of run time. Take the oil filter and cut it open. Pull out the filter element and unfold it on a table. Get a magnifying glass and look for signs of metal in the oil. Keep a close eye on your oil pressure while it is running. If it is lower than usual or drops suddenly, then shut it down right away and you will probably need to pull the pan to check for trashed bearings. As an Ex-drag racer (too much of a money pit for me) this is excellent advice, not just for Fulltimin but for anyone who has let a motor sit for more than 6 months through winter and summer temps. Years ago I bought a 440 Chrysler just for the engine, as it had been sitting for about 18 months in Columbus, Ohio. What a mess the cylinders were when I tore it down to rebuild it. A couple of the rod bearings were questionable as well. Odometer only had about 40k miles on it. So you can never be too careful. Al
FloridaRosebud 12/22/19 07:16pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Refrigerator question for you class A campers

My personal opinion of "alternative energies", all of them, is that they're not ready for prime time. They're still expensive and inefficient. The sun's not always out, and the wind doesn't always blow. It's also true that the only way they even stay on the market is through government subsidies, for consumers through local power companies, or through massive federal subsidies for companies. Take away the subsidies and they disappear - remember "Solyndra"? Your tax money at work. Yeah, unfortunately you are mostly right. As an EE I sometimes work with solar farms and wind farms. Given enough real estate they can work. But for home use, the cost of a solar system, including batteries to use when the sun is not out, has an 8-12 year payback at the moment. Not cost effective for most. That said, having a system without batteries can payback in 5-6 years, but you will still be using utility power 50% or so of the time. There is just not enough roof room to run 2 A/C units in a Class A..... Al
FloridaRosebud 12/20/19 02:13pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Repairs and Upgrades

People learn by doing, and often doing comes out of necessity - either stranded or financially driven - or both and of course some just like to do it. I fall in the financial driver slot fueled by necessity. Now, if I ever came into a lot of money, like lotto money, rest assured I would simply pay people to work on my Prevost while I have lunch and a beer in the cabana. Some folks who have a lot of money still like to do their own stuff. Hats off to you. I think in my younger years I also felt that way. Now that I am older, I am fine using my credit card as a primary tool. But - and this is important - I still could if I needed to on most things. Some stuff is still better left to the experts. The issue is finding an expert. Well put. Al
FloridaRosebud 12/20/19 02:08pm Class A Motorhomes
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