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RE: Best quality: Micro Minni, R-POD, E PRO

I am looking at a Micro Minni, R-POD, and E PRO. All three have a floor plan I like and they are all around the same price. From a quality perspective, which is better? Things such as craftsmanship, roof material, insulation material, etc are things I am interested in. All are "mass produced" on a production line, "craftsmanship" is tossed out the door and replaced by undertrained and/or untrained non craftsman that must be able to fill all worstations at any time with little or no training. There is no "specialists", no specific tradesman and all work is done via moving assembly lines which have strict time allotments for each assembly operation. There will be at least a few warranty issues you will end up dealing with no matter the brand or perceived quality. Better roof material? Laughable at best, the same roofing that is used on a $200K RV is used on a $10K popup.. The manufacturer of the roof material often offers a 12 yr warranty, after 12 yrs the RV will most likely have been traded in several times if it hasn't been scrapped out by then. Insulation? Nope, plain old fiberglass insulation is used through out all RVs and RVs have a wall cavity of just 1" so R2 or R3 is best one can hope for.. The exception to this may be some "three season" or "Artic" RVs which may have a bit higher R factor insulation but those come at a higher cost to the end buyer.. Best bet is to stop "window shopping" and go in person and kick some tires on each brand and model you are interested in and strike a deal on what you perceive as the best "quality unit" that you have looked at. Walk through them, note how the floor feels, if it feels spongy, move on. Pull a drawer out, open doors, look at the fit and finish, if it looks and feels cheaply or poorly made to you, walk..
Gdetrailer 09/24/22 01:38pm Travel Trailers
RE: Single screw on dump valve won’t…

I don't think the "single screw" is meant to hold the outer jacket.. Outer jacket should be held in place by the plastic clamp/holder with two screws (see item I have circled in red) https://i.imgur.com/nrrA1l1l.jpg Only the center wire that moves the valve gate should be connected to the gate with one screw. With that said, cable operated valves are known to have reliability issues, if possible replace with a standard non cable operated valve.. On edit.. Found installation instructions for the remote valve to cable.. HERE
Gdetrailer 09/24/22 12:09pm General RVing Issues
RE: Cheap Win 10 laptop

Glad it is working for you. Just warning folks up ahead that it does have limitations. You got lucky on your old one with only 32GB of space, Win8 took a lot less space to install originally, 12GB-16GB, typically using Win10 upgrade path requires at a min of 20GB of free space.. A lot of folks have had issues with Win10 updates failing to install on the devices with only 32GB unless they add an external USB flash drive during the update because of the lack of free space. Bare metal install of Win10 takes about 20GB-24GB, generally you need at least 20GB of free space for major updates (IE "Refresh") since those are handled like an upgrade and all existing system files are replaced with the update. The old files are compressed and held in a temporary folder in case the operation goes sideways during the update. In the case of your new device, 64GB should be OK for a while but keep in mind, every App or software you install plus any files you save will eventually encroach on the minimum free space required for updates to install properly. As far as W10 32bit goes on 2GB of memory, that is fine, 32bit by MS's rules is not able to see, use, address more than 3.2GB. Win10 64Bit, while it can run on as low as 1GB of Ram, it is painfully slow and it makes more use of your HD Page file than it should. I have run Win10 64bit on 3GB of RAM, 3GB was a vast improvement over 2GB of RAM. Minimum I would recommend for Win10 64bit is 8 GB of RAM, that gives the OS some breathing space without needing to constantly read/write to the Page file. Win10 performance improves nicely once you give it more than the absolute minimum specs. Absolute minimum HD size I would recommend for Win10 (32 bit and 64 bit) is 250GB, gives you lots of space for Apps and programs plus data. As long as you are willing to accept the risks and don't mind that it isn't going to set the world on fire, then by all means roll with it, at $60 it is inexpensive. But for those who see only the low cost, they do need to know that you are not getting a whole lot speed and storage wise for that money.. For another $200 one can get a new real laptop with a much larger screen, faster processor, more memory and more drive space and be a bit more future proof.
Gdetrailer 09/23/22 09:55am Technology Corner
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

The trailer is a 34 footer and around 12,500 pound. Couldn’t get at it today but tomorrow I will start by testing my battery voltage under the load of full braking. If it is good I will then cut the wires where they first appear under the belly at the first axel and test the voltage there. The brakes two wires are encased inside there own grey coating and appear to be in a loom right to where they emerge under the belly. We will report tomorrow. Thanks for all your comments Most likely standard off the shelf jacketed brake wiring, looks like this.. https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/41biTzqdTqL._AC_SL1500_.jpg height=100 width=300 The problem is, with the wiring run with a wire harness or loom and disappearing somewhere and the resurfacing elsewhere you are not able to verify if there is multiple splices or damage to the wire.. With it hidden, you could have even had a rodent decide to make a meal out of the jacket and chewed through a bunch of the strands for good measure. Then there is the added issue of typical RV manufacturing laziness of using a very small ga wire running through the axle tubes, that wire often breaks or gets chaffed.. Either way result is less than stellar braking.
Gdetrailer 09/22/22 12:02pm General RVing Issues
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

Ok. Just Cut the power wires to the first axle there I had 12 1/2 V. As soon as I hook up the brakes to the front axle only it dropped to 10 1/2 when I hook up the rear axle to the furthest away wheel I’m still at 9 V. I’ll do a road test next and see if all new brake assembly’s has improved my breaking. So glad I have an engine brake on the ram. There is still some seriously high resistance in the wiring, I would have expected no more than .5V drop and even that would be high. If you have some 14 or 12 gauge wire hanging around, might be easier and faster to bypass the wire from tongue to the axle as a temporary test. You could feed the test wire through a window at the front and then out a window nearest to the front axle. Doesn't have to be super fancy for a test. Heck even a 14ga or 12ga extension cord could be employed and if you didn't want to cut the connectors of the extension cord you can make some adapters to connect it temporally. Sometimes it is not worth the damaged brain cells to fret over the junk wire used by RV manufacturers and abandon it.
Gdetrailer 09/22/22 11:48am General RVing Issues
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

Glad folks have found some of my information helpful so far! For a bit more advanced information I have done some "back of the napkin" noodling.. Bear with me, this got a bit long.. Wire line resistance has a profound effect on low voltage and low resistance items so to demonstrate how much this can affect your electric brakes braking efficiency I have made some measurements to get some known information of what voltage is needed to get a brake magnet for 3,500 lb axle family to draw 3A.. From the voltage an current measurements I can calculate the DC resistance of the brake magnet. To get 3A draw from a brake magnet I set my adjustable lab power supply to 12.21V at the brake magnet wire connections, measuring only one magnet (my adjustable Lab supply only can handle 6A per output). Brake magnet measurement of 3A at 12.21V = 4.06 Ohms 4 magnets at 4.06 Ohm in parallel = 1.015 Ohms (resistance in parallel is divided by the quantity) Assuming 25’ from tongue to brakes, we must double the length since we must account for pos and negative wires = 50’ of wire. So for our calculations we are assuming 50ft of wire round trip. For different lengths of wire or different ga of wire refer to a wire resistance calculator, I used THIS ONE HERE 16 ga = .201 Ohms add that to 1.015 Ohms = 1.216 Ohms. Divide 12.21V by 1.216 Ohms = 10.04A Divide 10.04A by 12A = .87 or 87% of max braking, basically 13% loss of potential braking. 14 ga = .126 Ohms add that to 1.015 Ohms = 1.141 Ohms Divide 12.21V by 1.141 Ohms = 10.7A Divide 10.7A by 12A = .89 or 89% of max braking, basically 11% loss of potential braking 12 ga =.079 Ohms add that to 1.015 Ohms = 1.094 Ohms Divide 12.21V by 1.094 Ohms = 11.16A Divide 11.16A by 12A = .93 or 93% of max braking effort, basically 7% loss of potential braking 10 ga = .05 Ohms add that to 1.015 Ohms = 1.065 Ohms Divide 12.21V by 1.065 Ohms = 11.46A Divide 11.46A by 12A = .96 or 96% of max braking effort, basically 4% loss of braking potential 8 ga = .031 Ohms add that to 1.015 Ohms = 1.046 Ohms Divide 12.21V by 1.046 Ohms = 11.7A Divide 11.7A by 12A = .98 or 98% of max braking effort, basically 2% loss of braking potential 6 ga = .02 Ohms add that to 1.015 Ohms = 1.035 Ohms Divide 12.21V by 1.035 Ohms = 11.8A Divide 11.8A by 12A = .983 or 98.3% of max braking effort, basically 1.7% loss of braking potential To be clear, every single splice or wire connection will add some resistance, absolutely no splice is 100% resistance free and that resistance adds to the overall wire resistance. Moisture from the air and even direct moisture getting into unprotected splices over time creates a oxide coating on the wires in the unprotected splice, that coating affects the resistance of the splice and with repeated exposures over time weakens the wire to the breaking point adding further resistance. Damaged or compromised insulation can allow moisture to seep into the wire and degrade the wire. It is critical to use a good moisture proof connectors if the connector is going to be exposed to the weather (yes, even the connections under the trailer get exposed to moisture, driving in rain splashes water and soaks the underside of the trailer). For the ones advocating using Amp meters to trouble shoot this, generally most DVMs with built in 5A or 10A amp reading will insert too much resistance and that resistance will severely affect your overall circuit amperage draw and reduce the voltage, severely skewing your measurements and results.
Gdetrailer 09/22/22 10:46am General RVing Issues
RE: Smaller Propane Tanks

Well yes 40# tanks are heavy so step down to 30#. I am a little lost on how hard many find to get propane. Around here about 1/3 of gas stations fill cylinders. No "gas stations" around my area or even anywhere near where I camp that fill propane cylinders. Used to have a building supply/concrete contractor that filled cylinders, they are gone and out of business for going on 20+ yrs.. I have one Mom and Pop hardware store local to me that does fill cylinders. One bulk propane supplier, one industrial gas supplier about 25 minutes from my home but both of those places charge more per pound than using a cylinder exchange (in other words, 20 lb cylinders cost them more in labor than what it is worth them for the business). Did have a grocery store 5 minutes from my home that exchanged cylinders, that store closed due to owner fraudulently mishandling funds and the creditor took them down.. Have multiple stores (like Home Depot, Lowes, Tractor Supply, Rural King) 25 minutes from my home including a couple of gas stations which handle cylinder exchanges.. Some areas also regulate where and who is able to have bulk propane storage and require properly trained personnel at all times to handle the filling which may limit how many places you can find that will do refills.. Folks can get hurt not knowing proper procedures and handling and I would not feel comfortable having any old "gas station" or "grocery store" attendant filling my cylinders.
Gdetrailer 09/21/22 05:55pm General RVing Issues
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

Measure the current (I's use a clamp on ammeter first to make sure as most in-lines are limited to around 10 amps. Then look at the wire size.. And length. Then google Wire Size Calculator :R Good grief! Reading the current will tell the OP zero, zilch, zero on WHERE the problem is. OP already knows that they are not getting full voltage at the magnets, therefore they will never get full current draw by the magnets. OP already knows they are not getting full braking effort. Now if you were wanting to check the "balance" of current being drawn between each magnet to make sure the magnets are evenly getting the same voltage then a current reading of each magnet will tell you quickly if it is balanced without the need to access the wires electrically. This isn't "rocket science", it is Elementary level basic electronics. As far as using wire size calculators, they are designed for high voltage applications like 120V/240V and are designed around the acceptable NEC voltage drops for 120/240 which is 3% or 5% depending on application. 5% loss at 120V is 6V and you would get 114V which is acceptable 5% of loss at 12.8V is huge at .64V meaning you only get 12.16V when your battery voltage range is 10.5V (dead) to 12.8V fully charge resting voltage. No need to "look up" the wire gauges, Dexter has already done that work for you in their manual I linked above. In that manual they give the MINIMUM recommended wire gauge for the length of the RV and the quantity of wheels. Using Dexters charts, most average length RVs with 4 wheels will fall into 14 ga, 12 ga or 10 ga wire as the absolute minimum wire size. Extremely long RVs with 6 wheels fall into 10 ga or 8 ga wire. I highly doubt most RV manufacturers will pop for more than 14Ga wire.. Myself I have found 16 ga wire used on my TTs and my 18ft 10K flatbed trailer they used 12 ga wire (unlike the cheap RV manufacturers). Once again, OP already knows they are not getting full BATTERY VOLTAGE AT THE MAGNETS. That means there is a high resistance somewhere BEFORE the axles.
Gdetrailer 09/21/22 03:36pm General RVing Issues
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

The spec to measure is amps. s/b 3 amps per wheel. Use your DC clamp meter and post the results. BTW when the truck is running... the source voltage will be 1 to 2 volts higher. OP already has mentioned that they are only getting 10V at the brake magnets when they pull the emergency breakaway switch.. There is no way they will ever see 3A per wheel as long as there is less than 12.6V-12.8V at the magnets.. Actual current drawn by the magnets is governed by the voltage present at the magnets. Less voltage available at the magnets = less current drawn by the magnets. Magnets on DC voltage look and act like a resistor, 12.8V at 3A draw means about 4.2 Ohms worth of resistance.. At only 10V they would expect to see about 2.38A per magnet or about 79% of the max braking effort that they should have.. They have a huge voltage loss somewhere and until they find where that is they won't have full potential braking effort. Reading the current isn't needed or required for this troubleshooting and may cause one to run down some rabbit holes that wasn't needed.
Gdetrailer 09/21/22 02:22pm General RVing Issues
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

following this thread, I have a 18K weight TH and could not lock up the brakes, so I took it to a repair center and they found some problems and fixed them, but still could not lock up the brakes, so I asked them why not and they said cause of the weight of the TH, well I said I didn't have any problem locking up brakes on my previous TH that weighed 15K, they had no reply. You have an extremely heavy trailer, you may even have the same brake size on your current trailer as the old trailer. The brakes tend to run in "families" of weight ranges. For instance, I am familiar with "3500 lb" and "5200 lb" axles. 3500 lb axle brakes covers axles from 3,000-4,500 lbs or so with 10" drums. 5,200 lb axle brakes covers 4,500 lbs - 8,000 lbs with 12" drums.. Now with that said, you also have a very long trailer and looks like it is a 5th wheel version putting the axles further back. That means you most likely have more wire from front to the axles.. More wire run = more resistance = more voltage drop at the end of the run. So, you have at least two problems.. More weight on the same size brakes. More wire resistance due to longer distance of wire run. You can do the same voltage checks, verify the battery voltage at the terminals under brake load. Then compare that voltage to what you measure at the brake magnets. If you see more than one or two tenths of a volt less at the magnets you may need to consider upgrading the wire size to reduce the voltage drop over the distance. If you do not detect much or no difference in voltage then the issue becomes more of the fact that the brakes may not be sufficient for your load.. Now, do be aware, locking up the brakes is not really needed and accidental lockup may be detrimental and now days many controllers cannot provide enough output to always lock wheels at full output. Not sure if any of the controller manufacturers even recommend that for setting up your controller any more.. You do want to be able to "feel" the braking effort when setting your controller up without locking up the trailer brakes. Each controller has it's own setup instructions so consult those instructions for proper setup steps. On edit.. You can check Dexter Axles service manual HERE as a good source of info. Dexter recommends the MINIMUM of 10 ga wire for 4 brakes and hitch to axle distance of 30ft-50ft (see page 11 of the manual) your trailer falls into the minimum recommendation of 10Ga. Note, you CAN exceed the minimum recommendations in wire size, won't hurt and may improve a bit better on performance. Dexter also mentions "burnishing in" your brakes on page 11, this is a procedure which allows the brakes to conform to the drum properly faster than normal driving. When brake shoes are new, they may or may not always make full contact with the drum, so the brakes may feel weaker than they should until they wear in a bit. (I ran into that when I replaced my backing plates, took a few thousand miles before I had brakes that felt as good as the old ones). Page 12 of the Dexter manual also states.. "Note: Not all trailer brakes are capable of wheel lockup. Loading conditions, brake type, wheel and tire size can all affect whether a brake can lock. It is not generally considered desirable to lock up the brakes and slide the tires. This can cause unwanted flat spotting of the tires and could also result in a loss of control."
Gdetrailer 09/21/22 01:06pm General RVing Issues
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

I pulled the breakaway pin to test off house batteries and gained a volt. 10 volts. Yep, you have a lot of voltage loss, most likely due to some very corroded crimp connections.. Not unusual as the RV industry does not use weather proof crimps and moisture wicks into the connection.. Corrosion of copper creates an dull oxidized layer which conducts electricity poorly. However as one poster mentioned, while you have the battery under load, take a voltage reading at the battery and then compare that to the voltage at your brake magnet connections. The reason for this is while you battery may read 12.6V or 12.8V when no load is present, it can sag considerably under load if battery is partially discharged or no good at all. Something else to consider, the brake wire is run in a pair or set, both pos and negative ground are run from tongue to the magnets. You do not want to use the trailer frame for measurements as it may skew your readings if there is a bad ground or ground wire at the front of the trailer. Do not be tempted to connect the magnets to the trailer frame at the rear of the trailer, doing so may result in poor performance and may also cause your brake controller to not properly detect the brakes (IE No connection messages). Once you have good reading of battery under load you can now better determine how to proceed. If you have some decent wire (14 ga or 12 ga) laying around, you could temporarily connect that wire from the tongue back to the first axle (disconnect the existing wire from the connections on the front and at the first axle). The remeasure the voltage. If you get almost the same voltage as the battery at the first axle, then you have an issue with the wire running from tongue to the first axle. If that is the case, I would simply abandon the existing old wire in favor of running fresh new wire. Trying to find and repair brake wires can be difficult depending on how they ran them.. My current TT those wires were run inside the trailer walls..
Gdetrailer 09/21/22 12:42pm General RVing Issues
RE: Power voltage to brakes??

Never been happy with braking on our C Creek. Just installing all new brake assemblies and checked voltage at right rear and it shows only 9.5 volts!! This is not via the truck. I have it connected directly to a tested 12.6 volt battery . Should I see that kind of a drop from the battery? No. Not normal. Shouldn't have that much voltage drop, I would expect perhaps a few tenths of a volt drop due to wire resistance. Sounds like you may have severe corrosion at some wire spices. Or like one of my TTs, it came from factory with three splices between the trailer tongue and the first axle (near as I could tell the factory was using up all of the leftover floor drops on that TT that should have been discarded).. All of the splices were corroded. You have the option of cutting and replacing every splice or abandon the existing wire and refresh with a much heavier gauge wire. Typically RV manufacturers will use the lightest gauge wire they can get away with, it works, but due to increased resistance of the lighter wire and distance of the wire it will rob you of brake performance. I used two pairs of 10 ga wire on my 26ft TT, made a large improvement over the factory 16 ga wire that I found they used.
Gdetrailer 09/21/22 09:56am General RVing Issues
RE: Smaller Propane Tanks

20 lb propane cylinder holds about 4.7 gallons of propane. Propane weighs about 4.2 lbs per gallon pretty much all cylinder exchanges (you bring empty and exchange it for a loaded cylinder) short load the cylinders with about 15 lbs of propane or about 3.5 gallons of propane. In the case of the price of $19.99 that is $5.71 per gallon you are paying for the convenience of grab and go.. If you went to a propane dealer that fills your cylinder while you wait and you were to pay $19.99 you would get 4.7 gallons of propane at $4.25 per gallon! But I think $19.99 for exchange is a bit low, current price locally for Blue Rhino cylinders near me is $21 for 15 lbs.. Been quite a few yrs ago when I needed to refill my 30 lbs cylinders, cost me less than $19 for full 30 lbs (about 7 gallons) although I am sure it is a bit more now days. If you are OK paying more for convenience and don't mind only getting 15 lbs then use the cylinder exchanges. I found your post pretty insightful and appreciate the information. Guys, I don't look to spend more money than I have to but I also don't look to spend more of my time. There is a trade off. By my calculations, its roughly $7 more per tank to exchange when you correct the volume. I'll use 3 tanks per year, tops. That's not much money and saves me a LOT of time considering I'm at the grocery store every week anyway. Sheesh! I didn't know I was starting a controversial topic! As you said, there is some "trade offs". Nothing wrong with using a cylinder exchange as long as you are aware of the trade offs. I have done both ways, my RV cylinders are 30 lb and my gas grill has 20 lb cylinders. Exchanges don't deal with 30 lb or higher cylinders so I get those filled at a hardware store that sells bulk propane. Gas grill, I have two 20 lb cylinders and when the OPD valve requirement went into effect yrs ago it was much lower cost to pay the cost at an exchange place for cylinders with OPD than it was to have new valves put in and recertified or buy new ones with OPD valves. The exchanges take care of the recertifications and most will slap a fresh coat of paint on them when needed. Most exchanges are at retailers like gas stations, grocery stores which have hrs after 4 PM and open on weekends. Most bulk propane dealers do not have hrs after 4-5PM and no weekend hrs.. Just note, as some others have mentioned sometimes exchange cylinders have valve issues.. I keep a spare one for the gas grill in a shed away from the house, I had one that must have had a slow leak I didn't notice and went to use it and it was 100% empty! It had the exchange seal intact but the cylinder felt light and no gas to the grill.
Gdetrailer 09/20/22 07:12am General RVing Issues
RE: Smaller Propane Tanks

What are you paying per gallon? $19.99 for an exchange doesn't seem that bad to me. 20 lb propane cylinder holds about 4.7 gallons of propane. Propane weighs about 4.2 lbs per gallon pretty much all cylinder exchanges (you bring empty and exchange it for a loaded cylinder) short load the cylinders with about 15 lbs of propane or about 3.5 gallons of propane. In the case of the price of $19.99 that is $5.71 per gallon you are paying for the convenience of grab and go.. If you went to a propane dealer that fills your cylinder while you wait and you were to pay $19.99 you would get 4.7 gallons of propane at $4.25 per gallon! But I think $19.99 for exchange is a bit low, current price locally for Blue Rhino cylinders near me is $21 for 15 lbs.. Been quite a few yrs ago when I needed to refill my 30 lbs cylinders, cost me less than $19 for full 30 lbs (about 7 gallons) although I am sure it is a bit more now days. If you are OK paying more for convenience and don't mind only getting 15 lbs then use the cylinder exchanges.
Gdetrailer 09/19/22 12:23pm General RVing Issues
RE: Cheap Win 10 laptop

For anyone near a Microcenter store here is about the cheapest Windows laptop. $59.99: Evolve III Maestro 11.6" Laptop Computer It comes with Windows 10 Pro Education installed. Quote from Microsoft: "Windows 10 Pro Education builds on the commercial version of Windows 10 Pro and provides important management controls needed in schools. Windows 10 Pro Education is effectively a variant of Windows Pro that provides education-specific default settings, including the removal of Cortana*. These default settings disable tips, tricks and suggestions & Microsoft Store suggestions". I've had one for three weeks and have had no issues. Full specs.. Evolve III Maestro 11.6" Laptop Computer - Dark Grey Intel Celeron N3450 1.1GHz Processor; 4GB LPDDR4-2133 RAM; 64GB ROM Data Storage; Intel HD Graphics 500 Basically just barely minimum specs to run Win10. The Celeron processor used goes way back to the "Apollo Lake" builds and is in the same "family" of Intel processors as a Pentium4 (P4) and "Atom" processors. The only saving grace with this version is the 4 processor cores but consider that as a very small amount of grace. The HD500 Graphics won't win any beauty or speed contests and 4GB of Ram is right on the razor edge of not enough memory for a 64Bit OS. The small screen is a notch bigger than a Tablet and smaller than a "Surface". 64GB of drive space will become a problem quickly as you typically need 20GB of space for Win updates while they are being installed. Be aware, Win10 pro education is only available through Enterprise or Volume licensing and is meant for Schools to buy and setup for classroom use.. Not intended for retail sale and public use.. It is not full OS so there will be some features, tools and some customizations that may or may not be available. At $60 it is cheap enough to take a chance, however given that the OS may have Enterprise or Volume licensing keys it may or may not stay activated without phoning home periodically to the proper activation server which is typically deployed on the Enterprise of Volume license server network of the school it was intended for.. Toss the dice and take your chances..
Gdetrailer 09/18/22 01:02pm Technology Corner
RE: a plea for more cool weather sites for migratory travelers

Not sure what you find "funny". I find it funny that folks buy a totally portable and self contained home on wheels, then for some odd reason what to stay tethered to an extension cord while traveling? May as well save yourself a lot of money in the cost of the RV and wasted fuel and simply drive a econo car and book yourself into a nice Hotel Room. One pair of GC2 6V batteries easily powers my home fridge conversion, provides lights, water pump and yes, even heat via the RV furnace for not only overnight but around 20 hrs and still have some battery left (not dead). It doesn't take much planning, effort or cost to make most any RV independent enough to travel for days at a time without ever needing commercial power. OP doesn't "want" a generator buzzing in their ears all night long. Why in the world would anyone need to run a generator overnight in "cool" weather to just run the furnace? The RV furnace doesn't require 120V AC, just some 12V battery.. All you have to do is make sure you have sufficient battery capacity to handle the 12V loads for the time period needed.. Recharging the batteries happens while you are cruising down the road in your land yacht .. We overnight all the time, WM, Rest stops and the likes during warm and cool weather and have not once needed commercial power nor have we ever ran our generator overnight. Just takes a bit of preparation up front.
Gdetrailer 09/17/22 07:52am General RVing Issues
RE: a plea for more cool weather sites for migratory travelers

Lots of good discussion here. I do want to steer this thread back to a couple key points if I may. We are talking about overnight stops at places with electricity in the northern tier, during the two migratory seasons. Which to my observation, the move south ends by the beginning of January. And the move north starts around late March. (snow happens in our home town as early as Halloween, but gets falling in earnest by New Year, and 20 to near 30 feet by April is not unheard of; temps in the northern plains can drop to -40F (or C). Nobody with brains tries to go south by that point) Migration "ends" in January? You are way too late to the game. Most Northern snowbirds are smart enough to know to leave town well before the snow and ice falls My parents for nearly 10 yrs snowbirded in Florida, they would typically leave PA just before or slightly after Oct31. Leaving later than that can result in you enduring some very bad weather conditions from North West PA all the way down in to North Carolina. South Carolina and even Georgia have been known to occasionally get quick blasts of snow and they are not really setup to deal with that so even a inch or two can shut down roads. My parents made that mistake several times leaving just before Thanksgiving or just after.. Both times the result was the Interstate roads were closed due to unpassable roads to ALL traffic and ALL traffic was routed off the Interstate. Both times they ended up in a parking lot in the middle of nowhere for several days. The first time, my parents were not prepared for this type of disaster, only had a Group24 battery for the 5th wheel and left the truck connected (charge line was hot all the time). Woke up to a dead trailer AND truck battery and no way to start the truck. Had to wait in freezing temps for many hrs until AAA could show up and give a jump. The second time, they wisely found a gas station which allowed them to plug an extension cord overnight.. Still unprepared but a bit wiser. Winter shows up way before January in many northern states and can be very unpredictable so the wisest thing to do is to stick some extra battery capacity into your rig, supplement with some solar panels on the roof and even carry a small generator.. Be prepared for several days of being delayed and staying put. Worst plan is to ignore the weather, throw caution to the wind and hope there is a live electric plug somewhere you can use.. Depending on a bunch of campgrounds being open and easily accessed in winter time is a foolhardy plan. You have a "self contained" mobile home but yet you are not willing to make it "self sustaining" and cut the cord. An extra battery to what you have will go a long way in giving you enough power to run a furnace overnight without the need for commercial power.
Gdetrailer 09/16/22 12:49pm General RVing Issues
RE: Using pourable epoxy on floor soft spots

Wow, they have drastically shortened the warranties :M sorry to here this. Back a few yrs ago, there were often 2 or 3 yr warranties on most TTs. Keep in mind, new RV sales are similar to cars. A 2021 unit may have been sold in June/July 2020 which would make it over 2yrs old. Plus, leaks are typically called out as maintenance issues unless you can prove otherwise, so after the first week or so over ownership, it's a tough battle. The warranty "meter" on RVs just like automobiles does not start until you have signed and taken possession. After that you are at the mercy of the dealership network and manufacturer on how well they handle the warranty and repairs. That is the "gold standard". So, a "2021" model may have been manufactured in "2020" but the "consumer's" warranty clock doesn't start running until the buyer (consumer) signs the sales agreement and pulls it off the lot in 2021. Up to the point of sale, the dealer and manufacturer are on the hook for failing to provide proper care of a 2020 built 2021 model that was sold in 2021 up to the point it was sold. In a nutshell, the hidden damage exhibited by the OPs pix could and most likely started well before the OP signed the agreement and took possession.. It takes time for moisture to wick and soften wood, this was not a one month or even one yr worth of exposure, but most likely was leaking as soon as it left the factory. Approaching this with proper tact through the dealer and possibly directly with the manufacturer on such a new trailer, the manufacturer may be willing to exercise some "goodwill" in making the unit whole again at minimal expense to the OP.. Going in with guns a blazing isn't going to help, OP just needs to be calm but firm in getting the manufacturer to help getting the unit made right.
Gdetrailer 09/16/22 10:38am Travel Trailers
RE: a plea for more cool weather sites for migratory travelers

What you say makes a lot of sense - if most of the campground's sites remain open. What I have found (but due to demand you have to book many months in advance) are campgrounds that fully close most of the sites. The remaining sites are generally close to the office and very likely only provide electric. Staffing is generally the owner(s) and MAYBE one person for part-time phone coverage. Minimal plowing, minimal maintenance - they would keep the office accessible regardless if open or closed. Showers as well as other park amenities are closed. You might be able to get water jugs filled from inside the office. As I said, the few campgrounds that offer this do a brisk business with their limited sites. I wish more campgrounds offered this service. I don't believe very many campgrounds will find it economically viable to keep a couple or handful of sites near the office open yr round. If it was, they WOULD already be doing that everywhere.. I see your from Texas, up here in PA, pretty much all campgrounds close, even ones that are setup with permanent lot leases. It is not unusual to have a winter storm sock roads in with a lot of drifting snow along with ice.. I live on a pretty busy rural road and there have been a lot of times over the years I called off from work when I woke up to 6" of fresh snow on a bed of 1/4" thick ice that happened overnight and no sign of a plow and salt truck for hrs.. Heck vehicles often get stuck on the hill below my home every winter.. If you think a campground can "operate" and still turn a profit on one or two "overnighters" in the middle of winter, I would suggest perhaps you may have a good business plan to start your own chain of "overnight" campgrounds across the US and have a go at it. Find a few small gas stations and pitch your idea and give it a spin, charge $10 for one night and split it with the station.. But for larger campgrounds doing this, I suspect if they really thought they could turn a profit they would have been doing it for yrs. Your plea won't even be considered.
Gdetrailer 09/15/22 08:59pm General RVing Issues
RE: Using pourable epoxy on floor soft spots

Even though the unit is a 2021, it was purchased in 2020 and is out of warranty. I have contacted the manufactured several times and they are not getting back to me. The soft spots are not numerous - and I know the proper repair is to cut out the osb and repair it. Given that I only have a few spots - I thought I might get away with an epoxy repair. Given the location of the spots - its really going to take some work to replace the wood where the issues are. The door will have to come out - amongst some other furniture and wall panels. Wow, they have drastically shortened the warranties :M sorry to here this. Back a few yrs ago, there were often 2 or 3 yr warranties on most TTs. The problem with a quick fix, is the damage when it comes to water is typically a lot more extensive, the soft spots are a symptom of long term leaks that happened without your knowledge until you start noticing a soft spot. Epoxy by itself is going to create a temporary at best hard inflexible bridge to the adjacent OSB which will still flex. The already compromised OSB around the epoxy will simply continue deteriorating. OSB is pretty much all water based glue with large flecks of wood chips and the whole thing is pressed together under high pressure until the glue sets. All it takes is a little moisture to wick into the wood strands and it all falls apart. OSB and MDF doesn't glue well if you are looking for strength. I didn't check your model number, if it is a "lite" or Lightweight trailer, you may have a double whammy.. Typically to save weight, the manufacturers for "lite" models use much thinner 1/4" subfloor which starts to weaken and sag in high traffic areas.. Basically the floor strength depends on the foam insulation and that breaks down each time it is walked on and flexed.
Gdetrailer 09/15/22 08:40pm Travel Trailers
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