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 > Your search for posts made by 'Groover' found 85 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: 2024 GMC and 2023 Super Duty

Dealer markups seem to have gone away around here. With the vehicles I see starting to pile up on the dealer's lots I expect to see some serious discounts soon.
Groover 01/29/23 12:31pm Tow Vehicles
RE: DISCUSSION: 8 ft + crew cab vs. SUV

I think that a lot depends on whether your truck will be dedicated to towing the trailer or if it is also going to be used for other tasks. I just ran an errand to Home Depot and Walmart and was thinking how glad I was that I wasn't in a crew cab pickup with an 8ft bed. Even my crew cab with a 6.5ft bed feels cumbersome in parking lots. With trucks being so high these days reaching something in the front of an 8ft bet can be quite a challenge too.
Groover 01/23/23 01:46pm Tow Vehicles
RE: EV alternative for light/medium duty trucks

Grover I'm all for nuclear power, if you can tell me how and where to safely store the waste. Until that happens I'm anti nuclear. I believe that there are plenty of good options for storage. That is pretty naive. Fact is no country anywhere in the world has a long term disposal site In operation. No one wants high-level nuclear waste in their backyard. So nuclear waste sits at open and closed nuclear plants, a huge security risk. Look at the radioactive half lives of the high-level waste components: Technetium-99 211,000 years Tin-126 230,000 years Selenium-79 327,000 years Zirconium-93. 1,530,000 years Caesium-135. 2,300,000 years Palladium-107. 6,500,000 years Iodine-129. 15,700,000 years If we continue on our current path how long do we have before climate change kills us all? The climate change activists seem to think it will be before the natural deaths of my children. How do you compare potential deaths 15,000 years out to sure deaths within the lifetimes of your children? Or, are you saying that climate change isn't really all that bad? Keep in mind that we probably only need to buy another 50 years or so before fusion is viable and fusion doesn't make those types of waste. I still believe that if we can get past the NIMBY attitude there are solutions to nuclear storage that will either outlast our civilization or until even better solutions will be found. I know what the problems are, I want to hear solutions.
Groover 01/17/23 11:10am Tow Vehicles
RE: EV alternative for light/medium duty trucks

Grover I'm all for nuclear power, if you can tell me how and where to safely store the waste. Until that happens I'm anti nuclear. I believe that there are plenty of good options for storage. It is just that for every solution there are some people in opposition to it. Just yesterday I saw an article claiming that offshore windmills are killing whales and need to be banned. Windmills and solar panels both create large quantities of hazardous waste. Some of it is possibly as dangerous as anything that could comes out of a nuclear plant. Environmentalists are tearing down hydro plants and blocking new ones. Sometimes this is taken to far extremes. A dam near me was blocked 30 years ago by an environmentalist just looking for an excuse to block the dam. He found a previously unknown type of minnow in the river and the dam was blocked to save the minnow. Later it was discovered that the minnows are plentiful elsewhere but had not been noticed before. So, if we block coal, nuclear, hydro, windmills, solar panels, and all types of petroleum products, how do you propose that we get around? Before you say horses keep in mind that they not only leave waste products in the road they also pollute the air and will even die in the road to be hauled away. You should read some articles about how nasty cities were before horses were replaced by the Model T. Every power source has drawbacks. We either have to kill of 99% of the humans and go back to the stone age or we have to find a manageable course forward. Personally, I believe that nuclear fission has proven to be the safest and cleanest source we have that is both expandable and affordable. It is looking more and more likely that fusion will be a viable power source in the not too distant future but we are not there yet. There is also some significant progress being made with solar panels and they could well be the best option in many places. We need to keep an open mind to all options.
Groover 01/17/23 09:15am Tow Vehicles
RE: EV alternative for light/medium duty trucks

Too many things do not make any sense. At a time when we are all being pushed into EVs, and electricity supply is constrained.... We have companies with warehouses full of computers running 24/7 To "mine" fake money. The electricity wasted doing this could have far better and more productive uses.. Then this fake money is sold to a greater fool for real money in the hopes that an even greater fool will come along and pay even more for it. So long as we as a society fall into this madness, I do not see how we can possibly affect the climate in a positive way. I have a long list of things that do not make any sense, but this is enough for now You are right about the madness. As a Tesla owner I believe that electric cars have a definite place on our roads and that that place will expand as everything related to electric cars improves. My concern is that most of the people pushing electric cars don't seem to have a clue on where to get the electricity. Sure, solar and wind will help but I don't believe that it is going to get us more than about half way there. As an engineer the obvious answer to me is that we need more nuclear power at a more affordable price. In the near term that is probably small modular reactors of the sort that Bill Gates has been promoting. With enough carbon free electric power we might even be able to start pulling CO2 back out of the air or make synthetic fuels with carbon pulled from the air. The response that I generally get from environmentalists is that nuclear power is too dangerous. And yet the can't show any damage done by nuclear power that is nearly as catastrophic or impending as much as the damage that they predict from too much CO2 in the air. There is an old saying about not getting the carriage in front of the horse but as far as I can tell most environmentalists don't even know why the horse is needed. Basically, many of the environmentalists are just as much or more in denial than most of the climate change deniers. If the "environmentalists" had not been in such determined opposition to nuclear power in the last 40 or 50 years we would have had a lot less fossil fuel consumption and the environment would be in a lot better shape than it currently is.
Groover 01/16/23 02:16pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Broken Frame on a RAM 3500

Wonder if this is related to the Frame Flex (or lack of) shown in this video? https://youtu.be/_f3CAnH7WIM That clip demonstrates the uber strength of RAM’s hydro-formed frame, but if used improperly, ain’t nothing infallible… 3 tons Too stiff can be bad as it lets you get into the material fatigue zone more quickly. That may be why chassis/cab trucks use less rigid C-channel frames with thicker steel. Better to flex than break.
Groover 01/07/23 10:26am Truck Campers
RE: Broken Frame on a RAM 3500

Another good point. No one knows how his rear suspension was set up. But one thing is certain, that camper won’t haul on that truck without something else besides the stock springs. Unless you are bottoming out the suspension going with stiffer springs adds stress to the frame. The suspension is there to absorb the bumps. Making it stiffer reduces that capability.
Groover 01/03/23 11:42am Truck Campers
RE: Broken Frame on a RAM 3500

Regardless of the well discussed issues here the frame failure was most likely due to fatigue. Fatigue is caused in steel by REPEATED stressing over 50% of bend strength and release. Flexing over bumps can cause a lot of stress and release situations. 40 years ago many of the truck campers I saw had shock absorbers on the front of the cabover going down to the front fenders. The point of these was to absorb the frame damaging stresses that lead to fatigue and also control a bouncy ride. I ran a rig for 20 years that was probably more overloaded than the one here. It was 19'6" overall with the cabover hanging out so far over the Supercab that it hit the radio antenna. It had a lot of frame flex that I felt had to be dealt with. I didn't like the shocks but I found some fairly still but flexible foam and built a cushion to go between the cab and the cabover just behind the windshield and full width. That extra leverage on the frame did a lot to reduce the flexing and improve the ride. Also, my truck never broke in half. Just a thought for people with long and heavy campers. If the frame was cut or welded to without smoothing the transition areas of focused stress that can lead to increased fatigue and early failures. For example, if a bracket is welded to the frame in a way that leaves a sudden step it will likely fail at the edge of that step weld bead. The step needs to be extended and ground to a smooth transition. Also, many frames are heat treated and can be locally annealed by welding and that can also lead to stress failures. Modern frames are designed to be light and strong which means that stresses are spread evenly throughout the metal. If you mess with the way those stresses are spread disaster can result.
Groover 01/03/23 08:07am Truck Campers
RE: No scheduled maintenance on Ford Superduty

Wow! That is an interesting and expensive situation. Reading that little book in the glove box is getting more and more important. My 2022 F150 came with a "Cliff Notes" edition of the owners manual. The real one is on line, or you can request they send one to you. I don't think that very many people ever read the paper manual anyway. Did you check to see if you can call up the full version on the screen? I had the impression that it is in the truck's memory. Lighter, less expensive and takes less space than the printed version. Plus, specific to your vehicle.
Groover 12/29/22 11:29am Tow Vehicles
RE: No scheduled maintenance on Ford Superduty

I can understand your nervousness about it but I have two older vehicles with sealed transmissions, an F150 that has been used quite a bit for trailer towing and 150,000 miles on the clock, and a 2011 Kia Optima with about a 160,000 on the clock. No transmission troubles from either one so far. I did recently get the fluid changed in the F150 as a precaution. My 2016 F150 only has about 61,000 miles on it but shows that 33,000 of those miles where pulling a trailer over 10,000lbs. And that is not the only trailer that it has been used to pull. If I am not hauling or pulling I generally drive something smaller. I intend to do a transmission fluid and filter change on it soon out of caution. It doesn't seem like it is going to be that hard. You just have to do everything from underneath the vehicle. That makes checking and adding fluid a little more challenging.
Groover 12/27/22 12:45pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla delivers there first semi

So I’m thinking this Pepsi douche should be thanking the People of California and the United States for making this possible. Like Time, I’m buying somebody else’s products here on out. I can't blame anyone for taking a handout that is being pushed their way by the government, unless it effects their vote or political donations. The blame lies mostly with the people making the policies.
Groover 12/18/22 09:22pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla delivers there first semi

Personally, I believe that either the quoted VP doesn't have a clue what he is talking about or there is much more to the range reduction than just weight and range. Note that O'Connell never said why the trips would be shorter or why just the initial trips will be shorter. Since he used the term "initially" it is implied that the trucks will eventually be put to work on longer trips. My personal experience with a Tesla is that weight has almost nothing to do with range. The increased rolling resistance from the extra weight is nearly negligible. There is no way that a legal load would make power consumption increase by a factor of 4. The reason that ICE engines are affect more by load is that every time they apply the brakes momentum is turned into heat and the only way to replace that momentum is by burning more fuel. An EV turns the motor into a generator which puts the momentum back into the battery for later use. About 10% of the energy is lost as heat but 85 to 90% gets put back to useful work. You can see that in the energy graph where the range actually comes back up when going down hills. You don't see that with ICE engines. It’s not implied, it’s stated. Have you done the math? I have. There is a reason that other electric trucks have x amount of range / KWH and and Tesla has 2X's-X/KWH. And it's not because they have a magic battery or battery formula. All you have to do is look at electric pickups and see what they get when towing a tiny trailer and then look at the numbers that Tesla is "alluding" to. All the other truck companies state their numbers and everything is in the open. Tesla is the only company where almost no numbers are given. Funny how that works hu? :S BTW, you must have a magic Tesla car. Because the more people I pile in my electric car the less miles I get / KWH. It's math and it works. You can't even get a sun roof in my electric car because of the weight and aero penalty. I do know that when my son used his Model 3 to pull a trailer that was empty one direction and had 3,000lbs in it the other way his overall efficiency was about the same. The effect of the hills was more pronounced but what he lost going up the hills he got back going down. Aero is a huge factor. It seems to me that many people here are laser focused on weight and mostly ignore the aero effects on efficiency. Weight is important when you are looking a frame strength, hitch setup, drive train cooling and brakes but when just cruising down the road it makes little difference, especially if regeneration is going to be used.
Groover 12/18/22 09:17pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla delivers there first semi

Personally, I believe that either the quoted VP doesn't have a clue what he is talking about or there is much more to the range reduction than just weight and range. Note that O'Connell never said why the trips would be shorter or why just the initial trips will be shorter. Since he used the term "initially" it is implied that the trucks will eventually be put to work on longer trips. My personal experience with a Tesla is that weight has almost nothing to do with range. The increased rolling resistance from the extra weight is nearly negligible. There is no way that a legal load would make power consumption increase by a factor of 4. The reason that ICE engines are affect more by load is that every time they apply the brakes momentum is turned into heat and the only way to replace that momentum is by burning more fuel. An EV turns the motor into a generator which puts the momentum back into the battery for later use. About 10% of the energy is lost as heat but 85 to 90% gets put back to useful work. You can see that in the energy graph where the range actually comes back up when going down hills. You don't see that with ICE engines.
Groover 12/17/22 07:19pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Overloaded or wrong truck?

I hauled a longer slide in for 15 years in my 1991 F250. It had a 12.5ft bed length, 20.5ft overall. The camper was a little lighter than this one but I also frequently towed a 4,000lb boat on a 4.5ft long stinger behind the camper. I did get some frame flexing on that setup. It was definitely overloaded but the frame never broke. That much newer Ram should have about twice the frame that I had. I never had all three tanks full at the same time. I always emptied at least the grey tank before filling the water tank. The grey tank in mine was behind the rear bumper. I didn't drive anywhere with much in it. A full tank that far back really messed up the steering.
Groover 12/15/22 08:34pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Major Ecoboost repair, long delays

That is what the mechanic told us. I don't want to call him a liar but I have not been able to find this pump or even a vacuum hose going to the area where he said it was. Older EcoBoost engines DID have an auxiliary vacuum pump. Some were electric, some were mechanical. I do know that both of my Ecoboost engines have vacuum boost for manual brake applications with electric braking for computer activated brake situations, like collision avoidance or ABS adjustments. I would bet that you still have a vacuum canister right behind the master brake cylinder. Mine are full electric. No vacuum chamber on the master cylinder. This is pretty new. Only out for a couple of years. The whole assembly is made by Bosch. That is interesting. Thanks for the update.
Groover 12/11/22 09:11am Tow Vehicles
RE: Major Ecoboost repair, long delays

Oh yeah, the electric vacuum pump seems to be there in case you need to apply the brakes while the turbo charger has the intake manifold pressurized. So it connected to the manifold via the brake vacuum booster and debris can be sucked through. Apparently, failures of the electric pumps are not uncommon. The amount of damage that my daughter's truck suffered is. That is what the mechanic told us but based on some other issues that have come up I don't put a lot of stock in what that guy told us but the bottom line is that I still need a good engine. Yes, vacuum can travel from the pump to the intake, but I can not understand the failure mode of the pump that could damage the engine ? FYI, my 2022 F150 2.7L EcoBoost has electric power assist brakes and electric power assist steering. That is what the mechanic told us. I don't want to call him a liar but I have not been able to find this pump or even a vacuum hose going to the area where he said it was. Unfortunately, it is my daughter's truck and since she had picked out this shop and arranged the first repair she thought that it was appropriate for her to see it through. She is brilliant in several fields but mechanics isn't her strong point. It is possible that she misunderstood what the mechanic said. It is also possible that he just made up a story to justify billing her for a botched job. I do know that both of my Ecoboost engines have vacuum boost for manual brake applications with electric braking for computer activated brake situations, like collision avoidance or ABS adjustments. I would bet that you still have a vacuum canister right behind the master brake cylinder.
Groover 12/10/22 06:25am Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla delivers there first semi

While it is capable of going up the Grapevine at 60, is there video of that? It would have been speeding as the towing limit in CA is 55. I’d really like to see the consumption doing it as if I understand correctly all 3 motors would be working in that situation. I’m sure it’s well under a mile per KWh then. Said it before, Pepsi is beta test. I’m sure it will do great for them as the use pattern is set for success. There is a time compressed video on you tube. You can kinda see the display and topography so I guess that’s a yes. I won’t bother to look at it but if you have the time you might be able to see all the details. Here is the video that explains everything about the Tesla Semi. It even talks about the thermal nuclear glass that is in this truck and many, many other details about this Semi. Pretty cool!!! I never heard about the thermal nuclear glass? I learn something every day! The narrator lost me in the first 30 seconds. First, how did he divine how much weight is inside the enclosed trailer? Second, how did he calculate that there is only 5 tons of material on the Tesla's trailer? Those look like standard 10ft Jersey barricades to me and there appears to be 11 or 12 of them on the trailer. A Google search turned up the bit of information "The most common concrete jersey barricade size used is: 10 ft Long x 24 in Wide x 32 in High and weigh approximately 4,000 lbs." That is two tons each. 11 dividers X 2 tons/divider = 22 tons. Once I realized that narrator was blowing smoke I just shut it down.
Groover 12/09/22 01:01pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla delivers there first semi

I have heard that a leading cause of runaway trucks is drivers missing a gear at a bad time. Regen should eliminate that. I think the "missed shift" is less of issue the last few decades. In the days past, like my '76 Pete, (by then that set-up was rare. But that was the 3rd truck the 1693 was in. Likely the gearboxes where from earlier times too) with 2 non synchronized transmissions, trying a split, getting both boxes in neutral, getting back in gear was hard. And driver not wanting to show they missed was issue. Going up hill, speed would drop fast enough with the peaky torque curve, by the time got in a gear could not pull. Down steep hill, the best idea is save the brakes by standing hard until stopped. But many trucks sold in the last 15 years (or what I saw last time I was used truck shopping) for fleet operations had some form of computer controlled auto-shift. Bell, the Super 10 in my '95 Pete, moved the stick once from 40 MPH to topped out. Based on what I see just driving around it does appear that use of runaway truck ramps has declined considerably of the last 40 years. Maybe we won't need them at all in another 10 or 15 years.
Groover 12/08/22 09:09am Tow Vehicles
RE: Interesting video on the Cybertruck design & designer

The only thing I got, is IMO it is not a truck. Trucks are the way they are for a reason. The standard 8' bed can carry a lot of building supplies. It's popularity many years ago was the reason truck campers were born. Long live REAL trucks There are very few 8' beds on the lots at the dealers around here. I would have to special order a F150 to even get a 6.5ft bed. I sold my truck camper 8 years ago but kept the truck I hauled it with. The buyer of the camper told me that he would go buy a suitable truck and return soon for the camper. About 6 weeks later he came back and asked what what I would take for my 22 year old 2wd 8' bed F250 with a gas engine. I figured that it was worth about $3,500 so I told him $7,000 just to get rid of him. I really wasn't ready to sell the truck. But he called my bluff and handed me $7,000 cash. I am going to say the that 8' bed is not standard anymore. Government rules for cars have made them useless for many people so they are turning to "trucks" and their variants to meet the needs of their families and businesses. Since it is illegal now to have kids ride in the bed crew cab trucks and SUVs have taken over. A crew cab truck with an 8' bed is too cumbersome for most people. I think that Tesla will find plenty of buyers for their truck. The 1.5 million pre-orders support that opinion. And, so far there aren't any electric trucks on the market that strike me as suitable for towing much of a trailer. I think that the Cybertruck is going to change that. Especially with its ability to use a full megawatt output charger designed for the Semi.
Groover 12/08/22 09:05am Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla delivers there first semi

I have had my Model Y nearly 2 years now and their is no discernable wear on the brakes. Tesla put a lot of emphasis on the semi having good regen characteristics. I have heard that a leading cause of runaway trucks is drivers missing a gear at a bad time. Regen should eliminate that.
Groover 12/07/22 03:14pm Tow Vehicles
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