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 > Your search for posts made by 'Huntindog' found 578 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Check this out! A Dodge dually with a Ford 6.0 PSD!!!

It's a bird, it's a plane, no it's a FODGE!!
Huntindog 05/30/16 02:26pm Tow Vehicles
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

Went back today with another tube of grease and all four are now done. Two full tubes of grease and a bit did all four hubs. Pulled a wheel and checked the drum. No issues. No gross grease coming out where the grease is supposed to come out either, just nice new grease so I think they had the bare minimum at the factory and that was it. Travelled about 6000 kliks with no grease? I always touch the hubs every time I stop as a habit and they were never hot. The grease came out as was supposed to. I had bailed just too early as each hub needed just a bit more. Wheels are fine, brakes are fine. Your hubs had more grease in them than others have reported. When you pulled the one drum... Did you happen to look at the grease hole on the spindle for the inner bearing? There was a thread about this hole in the past having a sharp edge that could damage the seal when installing the drum. The poster chamfered this edge with a dremel. I haven't looked at mine yet to see if this is still an issue. If this edge still exists, the problem is that the seal can be nicked any time the drum is installed. So you can take it off, see that everything is fine, and then nick the seal putting it back on. When I do my bearings, (not gonna use the easy lube feature) I will be looking at this closely, and chamfering this edge if it needs it. Or perhaps installing the sleeves.
Huntindog 05/30/16 01:40pm Tech Issues
RE: The China-Bomb debate Put to rest

You will never, ever know how often or by how much someone's ST tires ran over 65 mph, or how often they were under-inflated, or how often they hit potholes or speed bumps at speed, how often they turned 90 degree corners on pavement, or how often they ran on road shoulders, etc. How close were they to their max. load capacity rating? Internal damage from heat due to under-inflation and/or excess speed is cumulative and it can be many miles later that you have a failure and thus you can't relate the failure to what you recently did. If you bought a used TT, you can't possibly know how the tires were treated. If you live on the west coast, you will never know how much the delivery guy drove over 65 mph or how many potholes or big cracks in concrete slab highways he hit. Your brand new TT can have over 2K miles on used tires in unknown condition. We followed a delivery guy last year in Ca. and saw how he treated the TT tires. This is what amazes me about the ST tire proponents. They are so accepting of low quality that they use all of these excuses for them. Any ST tire failure had to be caused by abuse like is stated above. I don't think that any of that is "abuse". It is a normal part of a tires life. I refuse to rub baby oil on my TT tires, have a rabbi bless them and drive like an old man who forgot his glasses to make them live. I went to LT tires in 2006, and haven't needed since to make any excuses for my TT tires. THERE ARE better tires out there for those that want them.
Huntindog 05/30/16 01:10pm Travel Trailers
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

Lets not get too far away from typical trailer bearings, here. Some of the members here are brilliant technicians or have years of mobile repair and other experience. Some don't like grease on their hands. I'm sort of in the Lynnmor camp, the EZ Lube feature is not so much a system as it is a hole drilled and a zerk fitting. If it works well for someone, cool. If I had them, I'd be pulling the hubs. About service intervals: For years, before 1970, trucks and cars all had a similar bearing set to those in RV trailers. Typical service intervals (using the fiber grease) would have been around 10,000 miles. Many of those bearings saw a harder life than an RV trailer. Opposing tapered roller bearing/races were still pretty common til at least the mid 80s... The grease was a lot better than what was used pre 70 though...Typical service grew to repacking when the brakes were done with the better grease... at least 30K. So yeah, their is no logical reason why TT bearings need to be done annually or at 12K.
Huntindog 05/27/16 11:44pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

Go around that car or truck and take inventory of how many oil/grease seals there actually are, and then figure out how many of those you've had to replace on all the vehicles you've owned. My guess would be very, very few overall. Which is my point. Your guess would be dead wrong. I have a 73 Blazer that I bought in 1985. It now has over 305,000 miles on it. I have replaced most everything on it at least once. I've had other vehicles as well. Had to do axle seals on my 2001 Silverado 1 ton DRW... That was a real pain. All parts, even grease seals can fail. In fact they all will fail at some point. Nobody can say when it will happen. But happen,, it will. The bad thing about the Easy Lubes is that it is unseen until it is wayyy too late. All the parts that you mention that you claim last forever... Call an auto parts store and see how hard it is to buy new ones... It will be really easy. Why is that? Because they SELL them! To people that have had FAILURES.
Huntindog 05/27/16 04:49pm Tech Issues
RE: Creekside 26 RLS - potential problem?

Lots of times there isn't a choice as to where it has to be... The manufacturer has many competing things to consider. The tank location may be where it is to help maintain good weight distribution (not everyone can dump at camp) whatever is plumbed into it, slide room hardware etc. My TT has one valve like that. Of course I have four 42 gallon waste tanks and a 42 gallon fresh water tank... So they were running out of room with mine. LOL. But I wouldn't let this be a deal breaker. There are electric valves you can install, and the on off switch can be put most anywhere. You would need to hook up your hose before extending the slide when setting up camp, but the dumping would be as simple as flipping a switch.
Huntindog 05/27/16 04:28pm Travel Trailers
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

The first big problem here is that there are only two kinds of grease seals. Those that leak, and those that will leak. That's right. There has never been a grease seal made that won't fail at some point. The next problem here is that WHEN a grease seal in the easy lube system fails..... It is unseen. It is most always discovered after the damage is done. So for those of you that are giving good reports on using this system... I am happy for you now. But at some point your seals WILL fail too. It could be next week, next year or the year after. For all you know, they may have failed now.:EOkay, that's not the most ridiculous thing I've ever read, but it's pretty darned close.What part is ridiculous? The part about all seals failing at some point? Surely you don't believe that they will last forever. The part about the grease getting on the brakes when they fail? That is pretty much indisputable unless you have disk brakes.I've worked around machinery for 40 years that depended on grease and oil seals to keep lubricants where they belong. And as long as the seal isn't damaged, it actually will pretty much last forever. I've seen them last long enough for that rubber coated spring seal lip wear a groove in a 4 inch diameter steel shaft. How do you think they keep oil, under pressure I might add, in engines? They use oil seals and those seals last hundreds of thousands of miles. When was the last time you pulled the engine of your car apart to replace the seals? Or pulled the wheel bearings off your car for failed grease seals? Or pulled the differential for leaking oil seals? Grease seals and oil seals work the same way. So yeah, yours was a pretty ridiculous statement. Ummmm. Replacing a engine rear main seal is pretty common. I have done a few on my own autos.. Iv'e done a few axle pinion seals and axle shaft seals too. I've also seen quite a few wheel bearing seals that failed. But I have built quite a few motors, transfer cases, trannys and differentials.... So I DO know what I am talking about. But in most all of the cases I just listed, a failed seal is mostly an annoyance. The particular part just oozes or leaks fluid without causing any harm other than a spot on the driveway.... Not rear main with a stick shift though... That oil gets on the clutch. Our TT wheel bearing grease will end up on the brakes.
Huntindog 05/27/16 01:50pm Tech Issues
RE: Lippert - You can do better than this.

To be fair... It's not just Lippert. They all use the same nylon bushings. I just replaced my axles last year. While I was at it I upgraded to the Never Fail bushings. My old Nylon bushings had held up suprisingly well. Only a couple were getting bad. Not sure why they did so well, as we are not easy on it and tow a lot of miles too. I hear reports of people getting over 50K on the Never Fails. I probably had over 40K on the Nylons... Go figure. I had the bronze wet bushings on my last TT. It seemed to eat bushings as the nylon ones were trashed... The bronze ones didn't hold up a whole lot better.... That TT was a lot lighter as well.... Go figure. So when I saw the Never Fails on the market, I decided to give them a try. So far so good. I will point out one thing I have noticed on all of my TTs. The equalizer center/habger bushing is always the first to go... By a lot. Probably be a good ideas to check/replace that one on a regular schedule.
Huntindog 05/27/16 01:37pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

The first big problem here is that there are only two kinds of grease seals. Those that leak, and those that will leak. That's right. There has never been a grease seal made that won't fail at some point. The next problem here is that WHEN a grease seal in the easy lube system fails..... It is unseen. It is most always discovered after the damage is done. So for those of you that are giving good reports on using this system... I am happy for you now. But at some point your seals WILL fail too. It could be next week, next year or the year after. For all you know, they may have failed now.:EOkay, that's not the most ridiculous thing I've ever read, but it's pretty darned close.What part is ridiculous? The part about all seals failing at some point? Surely you don't believe that they will last forever. The part about the grease getting on the brakes when they fail? That is pretty much indisputable unless you have disk brakes.
Huntindog 05/27/16 12:30pm Tech Issues
RE: Bigger tires? Where do they make a difference

You don't have the authority to change the GVWR or GAWR. I do That's great! Ihad no idea it would be so easy. Can you print me a new sticker for my truck?:R This internet stuff just keeps getting better. More things that were previously hard or impossible to get are becoming easy every day.:B
Huntindog 05/27/16 03:28am Tow Vehicles
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

The first big problem here is that there are only two kinds of grease seals. Those that leak, and those that will leak. That's right. There has never been a grease seal made that won't fail at some point. The next problem here is that WHEN a grease seal in the easy lube system fails..... It is unseen. It is most always discovered after the damage is done. So for those of you that are giving good reports on using this system... I am happy for you now. But at some point your seals WILL fail too. It could be next week, next year or the year after. For all you know, they may have failed now.:E
Huntindog 05/27/16 03:20am Tech Issues
RE: WD shanks

To a lot of people higher price automatically equates to better quality. If the manufacturer says the part will do the job you can be assured that it will do the job. If it did not they would be out of business because they would not be able to afford to pay their liability insurance premiums.. Randy To a certain extent, I kinda agree. Our company switched from american suppliers of warehouse equiptment to Chinese supplied some years back. The steel used is obviously inferior. Oh the equipment is rated for the same loads, but it sure doesn't last compared to the American made stuff. The equipment is used and abused, but so was the American stuff. The failures that we see now, are much more severe than before... But the price is SOOOO much cheaper that it is considered throw away. We don't fix any of it. It just gets scrapped and we buy new junk. From a bussiness standpoint, it makes sense in this case. Now a drawbar failure would not make any sense to me. Just because the company that made it MAY be able to be held liable would not make me happy. So when a piece of equipment is as crucial as a drawbar is.... I don't cheap out.
Huntindog 05/25/16 07:36pm Tech Issues
RE: WD shanks

I actually own an EQUALIZER shank. That is how I know that not all manufacturers use the same steel. I didn't mention my shank in my previous response as I had no idea if it was one you were looking at.... I guess that made that response unintelligent in your eyes.... But now that you have an "intelligent" response, do you still believe the type of steel is of "no consequence"? I personally like that part to be as good as it can be... It is a pretty important part of the system.
Huntindog 05/25/16 01:38pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

Typical greasing of the EZLube requires how much grease? Half tube? Quarter tube? Pushed a quarter tube in and nothing coming out. Almost half a tube in another. Can't be that much grease needed? Pile of videos and diagrams out there but not how much grease would be typical. To get all of the old dirty grease out of the hubs will require 3 tubes of grease... Every time you service it.
Huntindog 05/23/16 05:00pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease in the Ez lube?

I just did it for the first time and it took almost 3 large tubes to do the 4 wheels. Some may have stopped using less grease, but I kept going until it was very clean. It is "mixed" for a while. My piece of mind that I didn't go past the rear seal is that with each pump, I could see the equivalent amount coming out the front. I don't think that would happen if it were going out the rear. Unless your seal is destroyed, the amount of grease that will seep past it is much smaller than what you will see exiting the hub. So your visual observation wouldn't show such a small amount missing from each pump. But it doesn't take much to wreak havoc with the brakes. Think about a garden hose with a small leak, Much more water comes out the open end of the hose while a small amount comes out of the leak. So now we all know just how many tubes of grease it takes to service the easy lubes... 3 tubes. And that is the amount it will take EVERY time (not just the first time) if you want to get all of the old grease out from the inner bearing.
Huntindog 05/23/16 04:52pm Tech Issues
RE: WD shanks

As already said, we don't know what you have been looking at. I will say that there are different grades of steel. I have even seen some shanks that appear to be cast. They tend to be cheaper. I do not know if any of this applies to the ones you have been looking at, but it at least gives you some questions to ask about the materials used, so you can decide if that is the reason for the price differences. As per my previous post, all the shanks are made by the major manufacturers and are of similar size and construction. Even if I provided specific items, no one would be able to decern the differences from a picture or manufacturers data. The steel is of no consequence as even the lowest grade of steel including cast steel would have a tensile and shear strength of over 100,000# for a 2x2 bar. The suspect items could be weld quality or or possibly fatigue failure. Fatigue failure is not likely as the bar is only subject to a very small percent of its 100,000# capacity. Now given the above information, does anyone have an answer? Same answer I already gave you. Some manufacturers DO use higher grades of steel... Whether it is needed or not IYO. They tend to be higher priced. Whether it is worth it to you or not is totally up to you.... Many people are happy with the local auto parts stores tools... Others prefer Snap On.. Both will do the job. Your money, your choice... OTOH I suppose it is possible to over pay by paying a premium price for a shank that is not made of the better steels... That is why I suggested that you inquire about that. Since you now say that is of no consequence... Just buy the cheapest one you can find.
Huntindog 05/23/16 02:29pm Tech Issues
RE: WD shanks

As already said, we don't know what you have been looking at. I will say that there are different grades of steel. I have even seen some shanks that appear to be cast. They tend to be cheaper. I do not know if any of this applies to the ones you have been looking at, but it at least gives you some questions to ask about the materials used, so you can decide if that is the reason for the price differences.
Huntindog 05/23/16 03:08am Tech Issues
RE: Tire Dry Rot Is A Misnomer

An article I read this morning on RvTravel.com. I thought it was interesting as I see lots of references to tire rot. For those interested HERE is a report issued by NHTSA on tire aging. You will note that on page 3 of the report titled "Background" they identify that "degradation is accelerated with higher temperatures", You may also note that there is no mention of UV as a significant contributor to the aging process. Tire Dry Rot Is A Misnomer NHTSA Report UV WAS not mentioned as it was not part of the testAre you saying that the test was conducted at night?:B
Huntindog 05/22/16 01:17pm Tech Issues
RE: Fram Air Hog filters

I put a K&N on my 73 Blazer in 1985. It has been there ever since. Probably over 250K on it now. I put one on mt 2001 Duramax as well... That truck had a mass air sensor. So the right amount of oil is critical for it to work right. I never had any issues in over 130K, but many did. Most do tend to over oil them.
Huntindog 05/21/16 06:50pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2, 6 volts or 2, 12 volts

I have a 50-year old suit. It looks the same as they day it came back from the tailor. Absolutely brand new. I must say this is the best suit i have ever owned and it equals any $4,000 Italian suit. It has never been worn. (David ... what has "never been worn" got to do with it?? The never-worn-stuff in my closet looks pretty bad after years of gathering California dust.) RJsfishin said that his 12 volts have lasted a long time over the years,,, then said that they were on the "wizard" 365, That means that they have never really been used. Ya gotta keep up with the conversation.:B
Huntindog 05/21/16 06:42pm Tech Issues
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