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 > Your search for posts made by 'Huntindog' found 568 matches.

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RE: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on the Open Roads Forum

It all depends on the design of the trailer and the capabilities of the TV and hitch. The general recommendation is that a TT should have fron 10% to 15% TW How this came about is pretty simple. Most TTs NEED at least 10% TW to tow well. And most TVs and hitches won't be able to handle more than 15% TW. The bottom 10% figure is pretty much set in stone. But the upper 15% figure can be gone over IF the TV and hitch are capable of it. In fact the more TW, the better they will tow. Many here are very concerned about TW as their TVs have a low limit in this area. Another thought to ponder, is that TTs are different from most other trailers in that the TW can vary a lot in the course of a trip. FW gets used and ends up in waste tanks. Food gets eaten and ends up there as well. Propane gets consummed and dissappears. Many other items can move around the TT as well. This why I always caution those with a TV that can barely handle the 10% TW. I have a stout truck and hitch, and like my TW heavy. MY TT has four 42 gallon waste tanks.... Talk about some potential for weight moving around!
Huntindog 07/31/15 05:18am Beginning RVing
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

So my question to you is, why do you care how others maintain their campers? The only reason I'd care would be if I was buying a trailer used. All other things equal, I'd go with the one maintained every year over one that gets this magical inspection every 7-10. I don't. The basic question is: Why is there disparity between trailers and TV's because Timken say's they are both a tapered roller bearing. I could be wrong, so don't slam me, just my observation based on the vehicles I've owned. You are; but I won't slam you as you have requested. Hate to break this to you, but what you're doing is not a proper bearing inspection. Do you even remove the inner bearing? How do you possible inspect the bearing without cleaning it off? Not proper inspection? But yet I have never had a bearing failure. :h LOL, fairies must be inspecting and packing them at night for me! Hate to break this to you but hubs are a sealed system. If the seals are in good condition and there is no contamination and the grease is in good condition and no spalling on the front side it works for me. Remember, I'm not the one with bearing failures. You're wrong regarding the lateral forces on bearings on a TANDEM trailer v a car or truck. See that little 1/8" or 3/16 x 1 1/4" shackle on your trailer? That little piece of sheet metal holds all of that twisting force you like to talk about. How many bearing have you seen fail from side load? (It's really called thrust load but I used common words for you.) There is a reason manufactures use big strong parts in front end steering and suspension parts but scarcely more than sheet metal parts to put with all of that thrust load of yours. X2 on the shackle. Also the spring hangars are just heavy pieces of tin as well. Fact is that these heavy side loads is an internet myth. It got it's start when the ST tire manufacturers made it up as a selling point for their junk tires. It has NEVER been independantly verified as fact. Just the opposite. Guess which tire, LT or ST is tested to a higher standard for bead seat retention force? The truth is, they are exactly the same. So much for the marketing of STs having stiffer sidewalls to deal with this made up increased force. If that were true, then the spring hangars and shackles would NEED to be heavier as well... It ain't rocket science.
Huntindog 07/30/15 03:17am Travel Trailers
RE: Live and learn

I knew better than to put too much pressure on my stablizer jacks and did it anyway. The street side rear caused the siding to flex to the point that the lower row of siding broke loose right at the connection point with the row above it. It actually broke the panel loose along a line just at the point where the upper edge goes under the panel above. It split the metal for about 18 inches from the rear corner toward the front. I hope to repair it without taking the whole bottom panel off. This is all due to frame flex I think.Taking the bottom panel off is pretty easy. It is the first one that comes off. A new panel will be the best fix. You will need a power staple gun to install it. I used a pneumatic one, but an electric one would probably work. I doubt that a hand powered manual one has enough umph to do it. No idea on the cost of the panels.
Huntindog 07/29/15 07:38pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Holy cow, went away camping and I missed all the fun. The interesting thing is that the fact in this 8 pages is 12k or 1 year is fact for 2 major manufacturers. The rest of this 8 pages is opinion. I think I will use the 12k or 1 year as a good reference point and then apply my personal experience and personal opinion to arrive at a repacking schedule that suits my personal RVing habits. But in reality it will likely be close to what the manufacturer recommends. What would be really interesting is if we applied the same opinions in the thread to trailer towing weights (ya I am going there... sorry guys). Just opinion here, not fact but... I wonder if people who repack religiously every year and never miss even by a week are the ones who will never pull a trailer more than 40-50% (dry) of the tow capacity and people who repack every 7-8 years tow at 200-300% capacity??? Is it safe to assume that what I have learned from this thread is that the manufacturers have to put some number to towing weight but that number is not right for everyone, so GVWR and towing capacity of the TV are really rough numbers as the manufacturer really has no idea how you are going to tow and then lawyer fudge factor has to be added in too... will you have 6 kids, 2 dogs and 1000 pounds of luggage going across death valley in the summer or a couple of tiny grandparents with 2 changes of clothes, stopping for groceries every day and only driving 2 hours across the prairies when it is in the 60's??? But regardless for bearing repacking or towing weight or most anything to do with towing, for those who are not very experienced should stick close to the manufacturers numbers and those who are more experienced have some wiggle room because they understand the risks and the factors that make up the numbers? Now I am really going to stir things up: Since TTs do not have odometers on them, and the only way to determine actual mileage would be to log it off of the TV..... I surmise that nobody really knows just how many miles they go on a bearing repack..... Oh there will be some that swear they know.... But in most cases it is only a rough guess... Some guesses will be a LOT rougher than others.... So now for those of you that want a firm milage number.... How will you deal with the fact that you really don't have one at all. Since thare are some that swear that the 12K limit is the golden rule, and they really don't know when they are getting close to it.... Better repack early so you don't go over.
Huntindog 07/29/15 07:28pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

If you had read anything I wrote, in any of my threads, you would know that I just bought the camper in March. I just recently repacked the bearings. You have no idea what grease I used yet you use a condescending tone suggesting I buy QUALITY grease... The real point is that you have decided to come on this forum and deride folks here because they are diligent with maintaining their RVs. What they do has no effect on you, YET you start finding fault. Perhaps it would be best to just live and let live here. We can all go back to our rvs... nuf saidI would like to point out that your questions have been answered... You just didn't like the answers.:B
Huntindog 07/28/15 04:54pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Actually. you asked me. See my response on the last page for your reply.It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply...
Huntindog 07/28/15 03:15am Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today. OK, So the manufacturer is wrong.... how often do YOU recommend?That is a tough call. I will say that everyone should learn how to do this themselves. I think more failures are caused by repackings done incorrectly than from lack of maintainence. (and that includes a lot of shops) If done right, there is no reason that they cannot last as long as on a car. But.... Everyones usage is different. Some are just harder on things than others. Personally, I do mine at 2-4 years give or take.
Huntindog 07/27/15 06:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today.
Huntindog 07/27/15 01:33pm Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

Do you have 6 lug drums? If so, then that is a great start as 16" rims are most common with 6 lugs. If not, then a swap to 6 lug drums is likely the best solution. With a diameter difference of only 1", that will only change this measurement by 1/2" over what you have now. So you are probably OK here, though you do need to check it to make sure. If you will not have the necessary clearance, then it can be obtained by a small lift. If the springs are over the axles, then a 1/2" lift block will work. The other clearance issue is the space between the tires. You need 1" when level. So you will need 2" now in order for the new tires to work. You likely do have this much space. If not, then there is no easy way to solve this issue Yes, currently have 15" x 6" Rim - 6 lug on 5-1/2. I'll need to re-check but feel like I have at least 4 inches from the top of the 15 in tire to the inside of the wheel well. . I know I have more than two inches between tires. Where did you get your clearance info? The clearance info is straight from the Dexter manual. Just checked. I have 2 1/2 inches clearance from the top of the 15 in tire to the inside of the wheel well and 5 1/2 inches clearance between tires. Doesn't appear like this is going to work without the lift kit you mentioned. I plan to call Jayco Monday to verify. I'll probably end up going the most conservative direction and mount five Maxxis M8008 225/75R15 10ply ST Trailer tires with the expectation I'll need to do it again in about 5 years. Thanks!2.5" is less than the minimum spec. Was that measure ment the same for all 4 tires? If so, then you already have a clearance issue. It is possible that you just haven't hit a bump hard enough for the tire to contact the wheelwell,,,,,,yet. More likely is the measurement wasn't done right. The axles are constantly moving and shifting in relation to one another. If the equalizer between the springs is not level, then one tire will have more clearance than the other. A simple way to account for this is to measure the clearance od both tires and divide by two. And... ST tires are considered used up at 3 years. From Discount Tire: Time •Time and the elements weaken a trailer tire. •In approximately three years, roughly one-third of the tire's strength is gone. •Three to five years is the projected life of a normal trailer tire. •It is suggested that trailer tires be replaced after three to four years of service regardless of tread depth or tire appearance.
Huntindog 07/26/15 01:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

Do you have 6 lug drums? If so, then that is a great start as 16" rims are most common with 6 lugs. If not, then a swap to 6 lug drums is likely the best solution. With a diameter difference of only 1", that will only change this measurement by 1/2" over what you have now. So you are probably OK here, though you do need to check it to make sure. If you will not have the necessary clearance, then it can be obtained by a small lift. If the springs are over the axles, then a 1/2" lift block will work. The other clearance issue is the space between the tires. You need 1" when level. So you will need 2" now in order for the new tires to work. You likely do have this much space. If not, then there is no easy way to solve this issue Yes, currently have 15" x 6" Rim - 6 lug on 5-1/2. I'll need to re-check but feel like I have at least 4 inches from the top of the 15 in tire to the inside of the wheel well. . I know I have more than two inches between tires. Where did you get your clearance info? The clearance info is straight from the Dexter manual.
Huntindog 07/26/15 02:33am Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

I posted in another thread my concerns with the ST225/75R15 Goodyear® Marathon Radial on our 2011 Jayco33rlds. I received a lot of good information on different ST tires and some suggestions on upgrading to an LT 16 inch tire. I am willing to spend the money on 16 inch wheels to upgrade to a LT225/75R16. I am looking at Firestone Transforce HT 225/75R16. The specs on the Firestone Transforce HT 225/75R16 indicates that the overall diameter is 29.3 inches. The overall diameter on the ST225/75R15 Goodyear® Marathon Radial is 28.30. Has anyone with a Jayco33rlds done this upgrade and if so what were the results? I truly appreciate the experienced minds that prowl these forums. Thanks for the help. I have no experience with your TT. But I have upgraded tires on all of my TTs. Some are eaiser than others to do. Do you have 6 lug drums? If so, then that is a great start as 16" rims are most common with 6 lugs. If not, then a swap to 6 lug drums is likely the best solution. The tire diameter is a concern in two areas. The clearance from the top of the tire to the wheelwell. It needs to be 3" or more. Measured when the TT spring equalizer is level. With a diameter difference of only 1", that will only change this measurement by 1/2" over what you have now. So you are probably OK here, though you do need to check it to make sure. If you will not have the necessary clearance, then it can be obtained by a small lift. If the springs are over the axles, then a 1/2" lift block will work. The other clearance issue is the space between the tires. You need 1" when level. So you will need 2" now in order for the new tires to work. You likely do have this much space. If not, then there is no easy way to solve this issue. 16" tires are a great upgrade, as it opens up a vast choice of quality tires to you. Due to the fact that many pickups take this size, it is one of the most common sizes available.
Huntindog 07/25/15 03:52pm Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

I guess the question is how much safer is safer? My TT axels are rated to 3500 lbs. each or 1750 lbs. per tire, my OEM ST205/75R15 tires are rated 1820 lbs. load range C. A safety margin of 70 lbs. per tire. When it comes time to change I will probably go to a slightly larger ST225/75R15 load range C rated 2150 lbs. per tire, providing a safety factor of 400 lbs. per tire. If there is enough clearance for the wider tire I can use the same rims. I could go to a D rated tire and get a 790 lb. safety factor per tire but where do you draw the line? Heck there are some E rated tire that would darn near allow me to go to a single axle. I have put 10,000 plus miles on the OEM tire and I bought the rig used. The tires will time out before they wear out and the ST225s are about the same price as the ST205s. I only hope they will ride as smooth.One thing to consider is that the tire rating is for a new tire. As the tire ages, it will become less and less able to perform as designed. Of course that is true of most all of the running gear, but axles, bearings etc. degrade much slower over time than rubber.... So starting with a substantial margin in a tire is a good thing. How much is debatable.... I like to get as much as is reasonably possible YMMV.
Huntindog 07/25/15 03:36pm Travel Trailers
RE: Damage after a tire blow out

Who knows....for them, they may decide the ST is what they want to run. But at least they have been given the suggestion to look a little deeper at the whole process of selection. After all....tires are pretty important. One thing we can all agree on hopefully is the importance of correct inflation. So, as a newbie, I have been reading this thread with great interest, and performing my own, independent (off this website) research (as suggested). From what I have read, yes, you can indeed run LT tires on a trailer, given they are properly matched load wise, and you select an LT tire that has at LEAST the same load rating as the ST the OEM originally equipped the trailer with. If a manufacturer alters the vehicle he is required to disclose that, even if the alteration still meets or exceeds the standards. So, yes, the manufacturer would seem to be able to switch tires from ST to LT, but would have to disclose that, and I believe update the labeling accordingly. Can't just do it without disclosing it. Having said that, and assuming, for the sake of argument, that one still intends to keep speed at 65, and one intends on buying a quality ST tire, what would the advantage of LT vs ST be? My still open for debate thoughts are There is currently only one ST tire that enjoys a decent reputation. That is the Maxxis. But Maxxis has a major drawback. Availability. Post after post on here where they have to be ordered.... Since any tire can suffer a road hazard and need replacing at any time, then this can possibly leave one stranded waiting for a replacement. This won't happen with an LT tire. They are available everywhere. (1) Potentially able to exceed 65MPH, if necessary, and not exceed the speed rating of the tire. I totally get that ST tires could prematurely fail by exceeding the rated speed. But, reading some of these posts, I worry that I exceeded 65 for a couple hundred yards, and now Im running on borrowed time. It's really a factor of tire temp, and running higher speeds heat the tires up over time. I've read if you increase the pressure of the ST tire, you can run them over 65. I wouldn't but.... In fact, Im comfortable towing at 65 and enjoy that speed, so no need to exceed it, unless briefly due to traffic situatins.Every time you exceed 65 on an ST tire, you are damaging it. This damage is cumulative, and can be hastened by heat, and even slight underinflation... It is also hidden inside the tire. You cannot see it or feel it. Personnally, I do not feel it wise to run any piece of equipment close to it's max continuously. Many other industries feel the same way. I remember from flight school many years ago that aircraft engines were not to be run at max for long.. IIRC it was recommended not to exceed 2/3s throttle for long. (2) Perhaps longer lasting tires? ST's are recommended to be replaced after 3 years, regardless of miles. Could one get more than 3 years use out of LT's, running on a trailer? Would you want to replace even LT's after 3 years? LTs will last longer. I replace mine at 5 years.. And I am in Phoenix AZ, about as tough a place for tires as there is. Michelin says you can go longer. I sell my great looking used LT tires on Craigs list to help defer the cost of the new ones. What other advantages would there be to switching to LT's? No tire problems compared to STs.. Often you read about all of the precautions one must take with ST tires... It's as if they are made of China... But the TT tires follow the LT tires on my truck, yet my Truck tires just do the job reliably with out all the tender loving treatment we are told is necessary with STs. If you were to read the testing requirements for LT tires vs. ST tires, you will see the difference for yourself There are, no doubt, inferior/junk ST tires. There are also inferior/junk LT tires. There are good ST tires (from what I've read) as well. Not all ST tires are junk. Now this is where you are pretty much dead wrong. LT tires, especially in the 16" rim size are available in many different price points and quality levels. Many from the same manufacturer. But most manufacturers that make ST tires only make one. An entry level cheap one. They call it affordable. Still learning, with an open mind. Mike
Huntindog 07/22/15 08:58pm Travel Trailers
RE: Damage after a tire blow out

I'd be willing to bet there are no tire manufacturers recommending LT tires over ST tires for trailer applications. Legally speaking, makes no sense for them to do so. Out of curiosity, which fifth wheel manufacturers are supplying their product with LT tires? Seems like that would be a legal issue in the case of a blowout/wreck "X product was delivered from the factory with non trailer tires and caused X incident". Not saying that has happened, just trying to make sense of it. Just throwing that out there, as it seems odd to me.Did you know that a lot of high end TTs offer LT tires, as either standard or optional equipment? Have you ever read the testing requirements for ST tires vs. LT tires? This would be a real eye opener for you. The ST tire proponents never like to bring this up.... They really cannot explain it well enough to convince most people... Heck I think it even gives them some self doubt about their hard fought position... But of course, pride keeps them from admitting as much.
Huntindog 07/22/15 08:20pm Travel Trailers
RE: flipped & chipped

The axle thing is a popular mod. In many cases it is consideed an upgrade. THe chips on the front... It sounds like what I call road rash. It is pretty normal for a TT to have it... All of mine have. It means I've been using it.
Huntindog 07/21/15 05:35pm Travel Trailers
RE: Shore power cord stuck in the compartment.

Marinco or Furrion shore power kit, no more problems. My next trailer will get this treatment for sure. Not only because it will avoid the "plug falling into the hole" issue but because it will eliminate another place for mice to get in. That little slide door thing will NOT stop them from using the cord to climb in if they want too. Sounds good but a local campground had the cords stolen from six trailers. Most likely for scrap. All had the removable cord.A lot of those guys will just cut the cords... Which repair would you rather have? Boy am I glad I don't frequent campgrounds. Let me see cutting the cord with 120 volts going thru it would make for a interesting timeSure would...If they didn't unplug it from the pedastel first.... Duh. We had about 400' of wire stolen from my work building. They cut it. Luckily for them, it was a ground cable.
Huntindog 07/21/15 03:08am Travel Trailers
RE: Mor ryde cre 3000

Are you trying to get more wheelwell clearance? I do not think that either of the products you listed will lift it much if any. There are other ways to lift it, if that is what you are trying to do.
Huntindog 07/20/15 02:49pm Travel Trailers
RE: Shore power cord stuck in the compartment.

Marinco or Furrion shore power kit, no more problems. My next trailer will get this treatment for sure. Not only because it will avoid the "plug falling into the hole" issue but because it will eliminate another place for mice to get in. That little slide door thing will NOT stop them from using the cord to climb in if they want too. Sounds good but a local campground had the cords stolen from six trailers. Most likely for scrap. All had the removable cord.A lot of those guys will just cut the cords... Which repair would you rather have? Boy am I glad I don't frequent campgrounds.
Huntindog 07/20/15 01:47am Travel Trailers
RE: Somebody's vacation got ruined

I think an auto ramp (steel kind, with a lot of rust on the right-hand side) bounced off the back of a 15 year old F-150 that was piled high with track-picked stuff. The driver of the vehicle pulling the trailer tried to swerve, but didn't swerve quite enough. The ramp landed upright, and the tow-vehicle missed the ramp, but the trailer didn't. It's wheels climbed up onto the ramp and as they hit the top, the rusted right side of the ramp collapsed, causing the trailer to crash down on that side. When it crashed down the China Bomb tires blew causing it collapse over onto its side. It then slid, skid around, pushed the TV into the guardrail pushing the rear of it up into the air. I hope no one was hurt.It's a small world. I was there too, and saw it the same way.:B
Huntindog 07/18/15 03:52pm Travel Trailers
RE: Equalizer- Sway Bracket Jacket

It must be a very small degree. I have used it both ways extensively and have no sway either way. I use an Equal-i-zer we have nicknamed "Moana." I, too, would think that the percentage of sway control lost would not be noticeable, especially if the rig is set up properly to begin with. I towed a 26-ft. TT for years with no sway control. My Sunline towed as well as my Rockwood does now. I'm not sure my Eq. hitch's sway control function has ever come into play. And that's my point. One can't tell if it is working, or how well it's working until it doesn't. Besides, no back-'em-up "beep, beep, beep" works as well as a Equal-i-zer to warn folks your rig is moving.:) Teach Well all I can say about that is we are NOT fair weather towers. We have been in wind storms and snow storms that most people here wouldn't dare to tow in. One snowstorm, we passed several cars that had spun off the road (it is amazing how they always seem to end up on their roof) and an 18 wheeler laying on its side. Whether it's all setup or TV or hitch.... Matters not to me. I always thought of these things as the total package. Nobody should be using a hitch as a band aid for a poorly setup rig.
Huntindog 07/18/15 03:46pm Travel Trailers
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