RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'RRinNFla' found 10 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
Should I get a new hitch in my new truck

I am planning to trade in my 2008 F250 for a 2021 or 2022 model. Back in 2008 I was told I needed a slider for my standard bed truck, so I went with a Pull-rite Superglide. So far I haven’t had any significant issues with my Superglide but on a couple of occasions I had to adjust my landing jacks to get the hitch jaws to release. I also want to stay with a standard bed truck. I do not believe a slider is necessary for modern radial front fivers. I am also one who believes that it pays in the long run to have a good quality hitch. So my options (as I see it) are: Have my 13 year old Superglide moved to the new truck, perhaps refurbished; Take the opportunity to change out the hitch for a model that absorbs some shock, like a comfort ride.: Follow up question, the big 3 HD truck manufacturers all offer a fifth wheel prep package priced around $1000. Is that worthwhile? I rarely use the bed of my truck for hauling anything besides my fiver.
RRinNFla 11/29/21 12:15pm General RVing Issues
RE: finding value for the RV

NADA is based on member dealers reporting actual sales. This works fine for automobiles because of the sheer volume. The data for RVs is less helpful. How many 2006 Georgia Boys have been sold by NADA dealers in the last year? Answer: not many. Your best bet is to look at RV trader for something close.
RRinNFla 11/25/21 02:42pm General RVing Issues
RE: Starting my research

One thing my buying experiences have taught me: what I thought was really important turned out to be not a big deal, while things that seemed trivial turned out to be important. Yes, a Class A or C is easier to set up, but you are talking 5 minutes rather than 10. Is that 5 minutes saving worth it? Only you can answer that question. Yes, a motor home can be set up in the rain from inside, but how often does that happen? You can always buy a poncho. From your bio, it seems a travel trailer would suit you. You might consider a used unit and see if you like it.
RRinNFla 10/06/21 12:57pm Beginning RVing
RE: landing gear issue

One other consideration is the switch. I have a four point leveler and the stabilizers are run by front, rear, left, right controls. Sometimes the switch does not make good contact. I should probably replace the control panel, but so far I have been able to press the buttons hard enough to make it work.
RRinNFla 10/06/21 09:24am General RVing Issues
RE: Question about freshwater tank use

All of the reasons above, plus if we need to use the “rest” room and there are no facilities we can use our own. I don’t like to fill it before leaving since 40 gallons of fresh water weighs almost 300 lbs. Most campgrounds without water have a fresh water fill station unless they have been shut down for winter. I also try to find out in advance if the campsite includes water hookup.
RRinNFla 10/06/21 09:15am General RVing Issues
RE: Looking for ideas on how to Roll up/store 50 amp cord

OP didn’t say if they had a trailer or MH. I use a sturdy laundry basket, then store it in the bed of my pickup. That makes it easily accessible at the next stop. I am going to look into the SOOW option.
RRinNFla 10/05/21 02:56pm General RVing Issues
RE: Flying J frustrations - Alternatives?

It’s not just a matter of the convenience of using the RV lane for fueling it’s also a matter of having a place to park after fueling. (One of my pet peeves is motorists who disappear after fueling while others are waiting in line) I like the convenience of Flying J, and I am willing to pay a little extra for the convenience. I admit I was venting a little about bad service, but my main reason for posting was to see if other travelers might be aware of an equivalent setup to Flying J. So far I haven’t heard any.
RRinNFla 10/05/21 02:42pm General RVing Issues
Flying J frustrations - Alternatives?

We’ve always preferred Flying J when traveling on interstate highways. I made the effort to get the RV Plus card which is easy to pay and gives me 6 cents per gallon discount. On our recent 4000 mile trip I was extremely disappointed with them. We tow a 32 foot fifth wheel and have a gasoline powered truck. The RV lanes are the main reason we go there. At least half of the pumps had burned out screens so I had to pay inside, usually waiting in a long line competing with the pizza customers for a cashier. The cashiers had no idea how to handle the RV Plus card. At one station, someone had run into a pump and all pumps were shut down. Obviously not the stations fault, however they could have put signs up or orange cones to let you know not to bother tryin to use those lanes. At another Flying J brand station there were no RV lanes for gasoline and the remaining pumps were at a awkward angle and very tightly spaced. Probably the most frustrating was at Lake Park, GA, I75 exit 2. On the way out the card readers did not work at the RV lane. On the return, 4 weeks later, the card readers still did not work. I guess they are hoping the gas pump repair fairy will stop by some night. I try to top off the truck when unhitched. I have learned to visually assess whether I can make the tight turns at regular gas stations. I have even backed out of stations while towing, but I love RV lanes. Is there a good alternative to Flying J?
RRinNFla 10/02/21 02:15pm General RVing Issues
RE: Wi if booster

Michael nailed it. Any network application is limited by its lowest capacity component . At a campground that component is always going to be the connection ( a MODEM) to their ISP, or internet service provider. In urban areas ISP can deliver 100-300 Mbps (million bits per second). In rural areas a FAST internet connection might be 10 Mbps. A Netflix user consumes about 5 Mbps. Do the math. A 10 Mbps connection would support only two Netflix users, and they would likely have buffering issues. Everyone else would have trouble downloading an email. To put it in a way most RVers would understand, it would be like trying to run two A/C units and a microwave at the same time on a 30 amp circuit. I suppose it’s possible that a Resort campground might purchase a commercial grade internet connection, but proper etiquette would require that you confirm that before you start streaming.
RRinNFla 08/06/21 03:19pm Beginning RVing
RE: Wi if booster

Anyone who even thinks about connecting a smart TV to campground WiFi clearly doesn’t understand the concept of bandwidth.
RRinNFla 08/05/21 07:06am Beginning RVing
Sort by:    Search within results:


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2022 CWI, Inc. © 2022 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.