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 > Your search for posts made by 'Reisender' found 996 matches.

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RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

A lot of debate about electric going on here. I can imagine at the turn of century 120 years ago there were a lot of people sitting on their saddle or in thier buggy scoffing at these early gas powered machines. Not near as many buggies these days. Dan For the record electric vehicles have been around longer than ICE cars. I saw one from the 1870's, there were reasons why they never made it and ICE vehicles did. So it took 150 years to almost compete with a gas car. Maybe a few more years they will overtake gasoline cars. Yah. The technology hasn’t changed at all since then. LOL. :)
Reisender 03/05/21 09:37pm Tow Vehicles
RE: And so it begins. (In North America).

Heh heh. I’ve actually had some pretty good coffee at a gas stations over the years. But most gas station coffee “es para lavar los platos” as they say in Spain. :). I’m not a Starbucks fan but Paneras is pretty good. Thinkin they won’t be opening up at a gas station anytime soon. :).
Reisender 03/05/21 05:00pm General RVing Issues
RE: And so it begins. (In North America).

I don’t think anyone will miss gas stations down town anywhere. Replace them with a great Italian coffe place that has great scones and I’m good. Maybe a dozen L3 urban chargers in the parking lot. :). To each his own.
Reisender 03/05/21 04:36pm Around the Campfire
And so it begins. (In North America).

This topic has been moved to another forum. You can read it here: 30213060
Reisender 03/05/21 04:06pm General RVing Issues
And so it begins. (In North America).

This kind of thing is already common in Europe and gas stations numbers have been on the decline for awhile. But that was more due to land values and fuel efficiency etc. Now It’s EV’s that are starting to cause that pressure. Obviously more so in Europe but this kind of thing will become more common as 5000 more vehicles per day hit the road without gas tanks. Our town has gained two and lost four in the last 6 or 7 years. The smaller ones seem to be disappearing here. Cheers. https://www.fastcompany.com/90608706/this-california-city-banned-the-construction-of-any-new-gas-stations
Reisender 03/05/21 04:06pm Around the Campfire
RE: Tesla is thinking of making a Van. B plus MOHO?

From what I have seen, car batteries for EV's consist of lots of little cylindrical batteries that add up in weight. As an RC modeler I use "Lipo" batteries that are quite expensive and require careful, slow, balanced charging. They require discharging to storage level 3.8 volts per cell. If we crash a model and damage a battery pack it may become unsafe to use or store. It may be that EP car batteries use safer, more robust, chemistries and the above may be or become irrelevant. It seems that miles between recharges is still a concern to EV users. A concern sure. A problem? Depends what car you bought and expect it to do. An 800 kilometer road trip in our EV takes about the same as it did in our Grand Cherokee. We haven’t gone much further than that so can’t say. For us that’s all we need it to do. Different folks have different needs.
Reisender 03/05/21 02:17pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

... Coal is irrelevant. It is a smaller and smaller component of North American power makeup. Coal’s forecast share of electricity generation rises from 20% in 2020 to 21% in 2021 and to 22% in 2022. Short Term Energy outlook Yep. And not just in the US as Europe is seeing short term needs covered by coal as well. Other countries like Great Britain and Canada are already seeing the decline. Interesting article. https://www.utilitydive.com/news/coal-could-be-just-11-of-us-generation-by-2030-moodys/558534/
Reisender 03/05/21 02:13pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

If the only thing important to a driver is driving 900 miles non stop I see nothing wrong with staying with diesel. I don’t know anybody who does that other than commercial reasons but hey. To each his own. A long travel day for us is about 600 kilometers (400 miles). For me, even 200 miles is more than enough range, especially if I knew I could fuel up at the nearest rest stop, restaurant, etc. 200 miles is 3+ hours of driving, which is more than I'd usually do without a break or switching drivers. Spending 30 minutes plugged in while I walk around (or nap, one of the best reasons to drive an RV - nap anytime, anywhere!) while I charge up for another 3 hours of driving wouldn't really get in the way of my travels. And I can charge up at the campground so always start the day with a full tank without having to find a gas station first. Yep. Travelling may be a little different in the EV world. Not necessarily a bad thing. In 10 years ranges will probably double again. I don’t think it will be an issue.
Reisender 03/05/21 02:08pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

With the extra Diesel tank in my truck I can go 900 miles (towing trailer) without refueling. How will a battery be able to cover the same ground? BTW the electricity in my town comes from coal and natural gas. How does having an EV change the equation? And we all just saw what happened in Texas. If the only thing important to a driver is driving 900 miles non stop I see nothing wrong with staying with diesel. I don’t know anybody who does that other than commercial reasons but hey. To each his own. A long travel day for us is about 600 kilometers (400 miles). A 900 miles range of a vehicle would not be an asset for me. To each his own though. A single exhaust pipe from a natural gas plant feeding a 100,000 electric vehicles is much better for air quality than 100,000 tail pipes. Plus the natural gas plant can be located out of high population zones. Coal is irrelevant. It is a smaller and smaller component of North American power makeup. Texas has a third world grid. They’ll figure it out or people will start making their own reliable and reasonably priced power. It’s easy to make electricity. Gasoline not so much.
Reisender 03/05/21 01:39pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

Here power is the same price all day although we still charge at night as BC hydro recommends it for whatever reason. I don’t care. I’m asleep when it’s charging. Usually between 1 and 3 in the morning. About 9 cents a KWh here, or about 7 cents in USD. CHEAP CHEAP. Eight bucks still takes us about 500 km.
Reisender 03/05/21 08:04am Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

Does anyone here think/believe electric will replace ICE in GM 2500 and 3500 series trucks by 2035? I can see the 1500s going that way...or at least all hybrid, but having enough power on board to tow 10K+ lbs over 200 miles seems like a big ask. They could build an electric truck that would out-pull modern diesels, but it seems like range would be severely limited. Well seeing as how the difference between the trucks you mention has nothing to do with power,the yes 2500,and 3500 willalso be electric. 2035 is a long way of in technology years. Who knows by the time '35 rolls around, electric may be the boogyman and we are fueling the planet on fribagumut I think the big difference in the 1500 vs 2500/3500 is expected load and duty cycle, which definitely relates to power delivery and consumption. I suspect the motor tech is there, but building a viable heavy hauler vs a grocery getter with foreseeable future battery tech seems to be the challenge. Of course, they are building fleet delivery vehicles that are electric, but I don’t think they haul heavy and they don’t tow. What’s also interesting about the truck market is that trucks are the bread and butter of the big three. Trucks and SUVs have the highest volumes and margins. It will be interesting to see what happens if GM has no ICE trucks come 2035 but Ford continues to offer liquid powered choices. I don’t think losing the truck market it will be as big of a hit by then as companies like Lordstown, Tesla and Riivian/Amazon will have siphoned off a lot of their market by then. Ford actually has a small stake in Rivian. That will probably help them.
Reisender 03/05/21 06:36am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ceramic Waxes

does it remove the old wax buildup on the vehicle? Nope. Wash it twice good with dish soap first and you are good to go.
Reisender 03/04/21 09:47pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Ceramic Waxes

Wife tried it on her Tesla. Maguires hybrid ceramic wax in blue bottle. She like its. She reports. - Takes awhile to put the first coat on. Subsequent coats are super easy. - Less is more on first coat. Putting on too thinck just makes it harder to buff off. - Super shiny and much easier to keep clean after. - Do the windows too. https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50203841357_569d0fb6bb_c.jpg
Reisender 03/04/21 04:55pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

Does anyone here think/believe electric will replace ICE in GM 2500 and 3500 series trucks by 2035? I can see the 1500s going that way...or at least all hybrid, but having enough power on board to tow 10K+ lbs over 200 miles seems like a big ask. They could build an electric truck that would out-pull modern diesels, but it seems like range would be severely limited. No idea. But presently all 5 Electric trucks being developed by all 5 manufacturers are 1/2 tons. Of course, 14 years is a few years away yet. You never know. Personally I think diesels will be around for a few decades yet...it at least in pickup trucks, not in cars.
Reisender 03/04/21 06:54am Tow Vehicles
RE: Wonder if truck makers will start making 10001 # 1/2 tons.

Although an intriguing idea, all EV’s are designed to not function when plugged in. That prevents people from driving away while hooked up to a charging station. It would also have to be a substantial generator. Yah I get that. But I think they may have a challenge breaking both the manufacturers code and the charging standards code. Hackers could do it, but most back yard mechanics are probably not up to the challenge. As well, onboard chargers are usually limited to 8 to 11.5 KW. Cheers. 8-11 kw,,,,, have not even tried the math but, since youre a proponent of these units and do seem to like the tech side of it,,,,, If someone had a 3000 watt genny feeding the tesla truck, (or even a 3) while it was being driven, how much in theory, would it extend the range? This is likely to become a real business in time. No idea. But it has a lot to do with wether you are going up or down hill, speed, etc. I would think an Onan quiet diesel, 12 kw unit would be somewhat effective. Really don’t know. I know the lifetime average for our old leaf was 6.4 km from 1 KWH. I would think a truck pulling a trailer would be a lot less but don’t know how much. Heck. We just drive em. :). The Cybertruck trimotor is supposed to have 500 miles of range (800 kilometers). I think it would be easier to just make a bigger battery pack than add a generator. A generator and fuel would probably add 500 pounds. Just add 500 pounds of batteries and go further. Much simpler engineering. EV’s are changing so fast. 10 years ago EV’s had a quarter of the range and took three times longer to charge than they do today. The most commonly sold EV’s sold today have 550 kilometers (350 miles) of EPA range and the average V3 Supercharger stop is less than 20 minutes. Where will they be in 10 years. :).
Reisender 03/03/21 05:10pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

The real question for me is an EV really cost effective when compared to an ICE or hybrid type vehicle. It is hard to cut through the marketing hyperbole on some of the EV web sites. I will probably give my 2009 CRV to my GS so I am looking for another car anyways and started looking at the some of these EV's. I tried to compare an EV to my current RAV4 Hybrid and this is my logic. I live in CT and my total cost per KWH is 27 cents( 9 cents to generate and 18 cents for delivery costs). Most EV's I looked would use 30 KWH's to go 100 miles. At 27 cents/KWH X 30 KWH's= $8.1 to travel 100 miles. My 2019 RAV4 averages 40MPGs so 100 miles/ 40 MPG's=2.5 gals x $2.00/gal = $5.00. If gas goes to $3/gal and it will that would be $7.50. At $4/gal = $10 to travel 100 miles. So to me the equivalent cost is about $3.40/gal. Not factored in is Ct uses mostly oil to generate electric so the electric cost will go up as the price of oil just not as fast as gas. This does not include all the other stuff others have mentioned such as higher initial cost of the vehicle, etc. Bottom line EV's don't make sense to me unless gas prices exceed $4/gal. Am I missing something in my math? Here in Michigan, I have a separate meter and rate for the electric car which helps. Also when we got our Volt a few years ago they gave us a credit on the lease of the car and a free charging station from Uncle Sam. They gave you a free charging station at your home? Or did you have to drive to the Chevy dealer to charge it for free? Not speaking for Tomman. But all EV’s come with a charging device. Some are basic and only plug into 120 volts while others plug into either 120 or 240 volt. What I think Tomman is referring to is some governments have programs where they will partially or totally pay for a secondary charge station they can install at home and keep the other one in the trunk. And yes, EV dealers usually have free charge stations at the dealership...which almost no one uses...because they are at the dealership. :). Having said that, there is one at a Nissan dealer next to the local A&W that we sometimes use. :). Generally the free stations are at restaurants or casinos or hotels. You drop 30 bucks on lunch and they give you 60 cents worth of power. :). Lol. What a deal.
Reisender 03/03/21 12:58pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

You guys are focusing on the wrong thing. This is not about AOC or the new green deal. Tesla has shown that EV's are for real and that the ICE is obsolete. EV's have left the drawing board and are in full production as we speak. The idea that we can't produce enough electric is silly. When the model T was originally made did we say this would never work because there were no gas stations? We have made it from the stage coach to jumbo jets the infrastructure will come. Going from gas stations to charging stations is not an impossible task. If you want to believe EV's are for real. Drive a Tesla. Driving a Tesla for the first time is a game changing experience. Once you drive a Tesla you will understand where all this is going and why the ICE is obsolete. The problem you are not seeing, is that the infrastructure you speak of that brought us to "Jumbo Jets" was the discovery of OIL.. ELECTRICITY is produced by OIL and COAL and Nuclear (that creates Massively Hazardous Waste that stays Massively Hazardous for 1000+ years) So, unless these enviro-nuts are willing to triple the production of OIL, COAL, and Nuclear power, there is not enough power to charge EV if EV shifts from 2% it is currently to 90% that is dreamed of... It is common freakin sense, not enough power PERIOD Hmmm. This might be a US centric point of view. I get that there are problems in the US. The US posters on this board continually describe the US grid as a third world affair with little chance of it ever being modified or upgraded because of some kind of geo-political issue. And that might be the case, but the US is only a small part of the EV market in the world. Most countries are not not predicting major difficulties with adapting to the somewhat small power increase needed to charge personal light vehicles like cars and trucks. BC Hydro addresses this on their website with estimates of about a 19 percent increase in power required to accommodate a 100 percent electric fleet of personal cars and light trucks. Also, I don't think oil or coal is a big supplier of electricity in North America. Certainly natural gas is, nuclear and hydro as well, but coal is playing less and less of a role, under 8 percent in Canada and I think somewhere around 18 percent in the US. I doubt it will be much of a player in 10 years in North America. The US will probably have some manufacturers that still build gas vehicles in 20 years but they will have a small market and virtually no export market as much of the rest of the world will have moved on. I don't pretend to understand what is happening in the US but listening to all the American posters it sounds like they have some challenges in front of them. Wishing them well and hope they find a solution to whatever the problem is. This is an old figure as I think BC is closer to about 3 or4 percent EV now. I know in 2019 9 percent of all new vehicles sold in BC were electric. 2020 numbers aren't in yet and COVID probably knocked things down a bit but there are a lot of EV's on the road here now...and a lot more every day. Once EV light trucks hit the market next year it will go nuts. But we have good charge infrastructure here and it is also going rapidly. The provincial utility BC hydro is playing a big role in that. They are doing a good job. https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49831525958_ba59f92eaf_c.jpg
Reisender 03/02/21 09:46pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

I could of replaced my older metal key for 75 cents, not cool. My Honda in college had a metal key. It was super convenient because it also worked in my roommate's similar year Honda, and it also worked in his girlfriend's Honda, but only to start the car, it wouldn't open the doors. Despite the convenience, it probably wasn't all that secure. Beside the replacement cost what do you do with the fob when you want to swim, fish a stream, free dive or scuba from the shore all of which I like to do. The low tech metal key I could just keep in my pocket and it did not mind getting wet. I have slipped on rocks in a stream and gotten wet many times. Meh. For a Tesla many just use their iphone as their key. However, we are also fairly active and don't like to always have the iphone with us. We paid the 59 bucks for the Tesla ring. It acts as our key to get in, operate the car etc. Probably our most used option. :) LOL It doesn't care if it gets wet either. To each his own. https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50043889621_eb57c2f9de_c.jpg Ain't no place to stick a key in my wifes car. :) LOL There isn't even a button to push. LOL https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50275591676_b770306924_c.jpg
Reisender 03/02/21 06:57pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Wonder if truck makers will start making 10001 # 1/2 tons.

For those of you that want to pull a trailer with your EV, Some trailer maker will outfit a toyhauler type trailer with a generator for when you are camping, that will also have an umbilical to charge the truck while going down the road, And those small engines, and industrial units don't have to meet all the enviro-whacko rules that auto's and light trucks do, so you will likely see the pollution actually get worse in some cases, although they will be a small percentage of the total number of vehicles out there, and you can still pat yourself on the back for saving the world. Although an intriguing idea, all EV’s are designed to not function when plugged in. That prevents people from driving away while hooked up to a charging station. It would also have to be a substantial generator. EV’s have gauges indicating charge state. They won’t need to be charged while driving anymore than an ICE needs a connection to a tanker while going down the road. Didn't say it would be capable of 100 % of needs when in use. But an enterprising person WILL no doubt find a way to circumvent your safety cutouts, and extend his daily range by maybe 25-50%. And the ICE vehicle doesn't NEED a tanker, refueling takes only a few minutes every six hours or so, until they match that, the EV is at a disadvantage that some people will seek to overcome by a means such as this. Yah I get that. But I think they may have a challenge breaking both the manufacturers code and the charging standards code. Hackers could do it, but most back yard mechanics are probably not up to the challenge. As well, onboard chargers are usually limited to 8 to 11.5 KW. Cheers.
Reisender 03/02/21 06:51pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

The real question for me is an EV really cost effective when compared to an ICE or hybrid type vehicle. It is hard to cut through the marketing hyperbole on some of the EV web sites. I will probably give my 2009 CRV to my GS so I am looking for another car anyways and started looking at the some of these EV's. I tried to compare an EV to my current RAV4 Hybrid and this is my logic. I live in CT and my total cost per KWH is 27 cents( 9 cents to generate and 18 cents for delivery costs). Most EV's I looked would use 30 KWH's to go 100 miles. At 27 cents/KWH X 30 KWH's= $8.1 to travel 100 miles. My 2019 RAV4 averages 40MPGs so 100 miles/ 40 MPG's=2.5 gals x $2.00/gal = $5.00. If gas goes to $3/gal and it will that would be $7.50. At $4/gal = $10 to travel 100 miles. So to me the equivalent cost is about $3.40/gal. Not factored in is Ct uses mostly oil to generate electric so the electric cost will go up as the price of oil just not as fast as gas. This does not include all the other stuff others have mentioned such as higher initial cost of the vehicle, etc. Bottom line EV's don't make sense to me unless gas prices exceed $4/gal. Am I missing something in my math? EV owner here. Your math looks fine to me. People in your position need to base their decision to buy an EV on other reasons because it doesn't make sense from the fuel point of view. So for instance, do you like the performance of an EV better, convenience (charge at home as opposed to going to gas stations) low maintenance. Winter warm ups from the cell phone as opposed to staring it up etc etc. If none of those things matter just stay with the RAV4 hybrid. They are great cars. We are just the opposite here in BC. You are from the US so I'll keep the prices and measurements in US dollars and gallons. Gas here is about 3.50 a gallon. Power is about 7 cents delivered. Absolute no brainer to go electric. Plus the vast majority of power here is hydro so cheap cheap cheap. For what its worth if I had to go back to a gasser I would be looking at a RAV 4 plug in hybrid. Neighbour has one. Really nice car. Cheers
Reisender 03/02/21 01:21pm Tow Vehicles
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