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 > Your search for posts made by 'Rick Jay' found 86 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: How many folks just want to gripe about EVs?

It's in our best interest for people to buy EVs... I really have to disagree with this statement. From beginning to end of the entire process, there is no clear "best" between EVs and ICE vehicles. As a daily work commuting vehicle, sure, an EV might possibly be a good solution. But for those who routinely have to travel further than the allowed range? Not so much. Or travel with young kids who'd have to deal with the recharging breaks on a vacation trip? Or hauling heavy loads, like our RVs? These things aren't ready to handle those challenges. Sure, overtime the technology will allow this and folks will then naturally move in that direction. As I said in my previous post, we SHOULD BE pushing PLUG-IN HYBRID vehicles now. It's a sensible compromise that has the best of both worlds. EV use for short, local trips. Gas engine hybrid use for long trips which will make use of a refueling infrastructure which is already in place. Should you come home from work and you don't have any electricity to charge due to storms, or such, no problem, you can still get to work the next day on the gas engine. They're a sensible compromise. Smaller batteries, less charging required, they can cover the round-trip range most commuters need going to work and back. But if something happens and there's not enough charge? No sweat, the gas engine will get you to wherever you need to go. To the best of my knowledge, there is not an electric vehicle made that would replace the convenience of our Honda Odyssey minivan on a long trip. And I don't see one becoming available for 5-10 years, so no EV for us any time soon. But a plug-in hybrid minivan, should Honda decide to incorporate that into their offerings, would definitely get my attention. ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/17/22 12:10pm Around the Campfire
RE: OBD Port F53

Best way to find it is to take a good dose of Advil.... I loved this advice. I, too, have reached the point in life where taking a "dose of (insert favorite pain reliever here)" is the first step of many things I now do around the house and the vehicles. LOL GREAT ADVICE!!!! :) ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/17/22 11:55am Class A Motorhomes
RE: How many folks just want to gripe about EVs?

Tax incentives encourage all sorts of stuff including home mortgages and having kids. I had to chuckle at this. It is an entirely correct statement, of course. But anyone who could be persuaded or convinced to have a child (or another child) for the sole purpose of tax benefits, in my opinion, would easily be swayed by the "savings" arguments to purchase an EV. LOL :) There is A LOT more to most things than tax liability. ;) According to this post it costs over $300,000 to raise a child through age 17. KHN Morning Breakout - Cost to Raise a Child in 2022. ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/17/22 09:59am Around the Campfire
RE: How many folks just want to gripe about EVs?

Sure, I'll jump on this bandwagon. I think EV's are being pushed upon us and forcing technology upon us that will be outdated and very expensive to repair for those of us who keep our vehicles for a long time. Do I think that eventually that will be the way vehicles are powered? Most likely, unless something better comes along. But we're forcing the technology, creating powertrains and batteries that will be obsolete before the useful life of the vehicle has been reached, and ultimately will just add to the ever increasing landfill piles. I think Plug-In HYBRID vehicles should be what is pushed now and probably for the next 10+ years to give the EVs a chance to develop an infrastructure AND to allow the electrical grid time to expand and grow to fill the demand for widespread use of EVs. The batteries are MUCH smaller so each plug-in hybrid battery made is much less damaging to the planet. Or, put another way, more than a half a dozen plug-in hybrid batteries could be made using the resources for just one EV. A plug-in hybrid has an effectively an unlimited range, except for fuel stops. Long distance travel can be done with little change to our current life style. Short distance travel such as typical work commutes, can make use of the batteries for the first 40-60 miles, which is well within the average work commute. If you need to run extra errands that day, the gas engine will get you where you need to go. The distribution network for gasoline is already in place, so we don't have to search high and low for charging stations. I can't imagine having an EV minivan loaded up with the kids, heading out on vacation, and having to stop for potentially a few hours to recharge. And the EVs I've researched would could carry such a family are in the $80k+ range. A good gas powered minivan is in the $40-50K range, and plug-in hybrid hardware would only add a few thousand dollars to that platform. MUCH more economical, affordable and practical for middle-class families. Like I said, I think EVs WILL be the way we travel in the coming decades. But I don't like seeing "bleeding edge" technology forced upon the population, especially when it doesn't make good sense, given all of the issues. It effectively becomes a burdensome tax upon the lower and middle class citizens. For the time being, I would like to see the plug-in hybrids be the technology which is developed. In my opinion, it's a sensible compromise. :) ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/16/22 08:33am Around the Campfire
RE: RV AC condenser w/integral oil cooler

Well, it definitely looked like it needed to be cleaned. Nice job! :) By any chance, do you know if that was the original radiator? If so, I'd probably be tempted to change it out as well. I always beat myself up making these type of decisions when repairing things. It would just be my luck to get everything back together and a month later the radiator would start leaking! I've found that by doing the work myself (free labor), that it's sometimes better to change certain items while it's easy to do so. Maybe this radiator isn't that hard to get to, but some are. And I guess it depends upon the price of a replacement. But cleaning it you should've gotten a good look at it, so hopefully it's still sound and has some good years left on it. Anyway, good job cleaning things up. Hopefully the cleaning along with your new bug screen system will help keep the rig cool for years to come! :) ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/11/22 11:17am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Front grill filter

udidwht, I think I'm going to have to side with the folks that think this might create a worse problem due to excessive heat. As wolfe10 mentioned, take a piece of that material (I'd think 1' x 1' would be enough) and while someone else is driving, you hold onto it with both hands and stick it out the window at highway speed. The air rushing toward that material will see that material almost like a wall, a higher pressure area will be created in front of it, and incoming air will be deflected around the material by that higher pressure. The same will happen in front of your radiator and you'll be limiting the amount of fresh, cooler air, getting to your engine. Vehicle manufacturers usually spend a lot of time making sure that proper air flow exists under a wide variety of environments. Remember that fluid flow is from high pressure to low pressure. A high pressure area in front of that material will cause the air flow to find a lower pressure route. As others have said, carefully monitor your temps. Even if things are just running moderately hotter, higher operating temps tend to shorten the life of lubricating fluids, transmission fluid especially, so you might wish to shorten those change intervals. The material you purchased is used in an application where there is a low pressure area created behind the filter by the circulation fan in the A/C. It is also (usually) contained in a rigid frame so air must flow through it, and it is not exposed to the elements (moisture especially). The air is drawn in THROUGH the filter. The air filter in your engine operates the same way, the low pressure inside the intake manifold (due to the intake strokes of the pistons) draws air through the air filter with atmospheric pressure on the outside creating the pressure differential. One other thing I thought about...you said you held it in place with zip ties. LOL...I'm a "zip tie guy" myself. But that foam material isn't that strong. If the material rips free, can it get "sucked in" to the radiator or go underneath and get wrapped around the fans and belts? Just a thought. I could be way off base with that, but figured I'd mention it. Oh...just had another thought...what about in the rain? That material will get heavier and stress those zip tie connections even more, while further limiting air flow. Personally, I'd think you'd be better off with hardware cloth (actually wire mesh). I think the size they recommend for "rock catchers" is 1/2" x 1/2" holes. It might not catch everything you want it to, but it should help and will pass a lot more air. Until/if it becomes clogged. Hey...it's your rig. Maybe it'll work and won't cause you any problems. We'll keep our fingers crossed for ya'! :) Good Luck, ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/10/22 11:41am Class A Motorhomes
RE: 2020 Equinox Charging Battery While Towing

I'm puzzled how the rear wiper, which isn't running, has a draw of 6 amps? How the heck much does it draw when it's operational? LOL ON EDIT: I just found this which might explain the issue. Apparently the rear wiper might not "park" in the proper position when shutting off and attempts to correct itself continually, whether the wiper control is on or off. Parasitic Draw on Equinox ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/09/22 06:36pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Slideout stuck in half way position

Situation has been resolved, The slide is apparently wired to the engine/chassis battery getting a full charge on the a battery has allowed it to work normal and be pulled in, it's now weather safe , for the coming rain tonight Great news! Thanks for posting the update! I hope you're safe from the impending storm. ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/09/22 11:16am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Slideout stuck in half way position

MrWizard, I'm sure you checked this, but I didn't see it specifically mentioned in your post.... Are you sure there's sufficient hydraulic fluid in the system? If you checked it before you moved the slide, check it again with the slide mid-deployed. Sorry, I don't mean to annoy if you've already checked that, but in troubleshooting, it's always important to start from the beginning. Good Luck, and I hope you're able to get this resolved quickly. ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/09/22 07:28am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Resealing Fiberglass Roof

Ok, I'm a bit puzzled. As long as I've been on these forums, I have heard some folks say that they would only get an RV with a fiberglass roof and that they WOULD NEVER buy a rig with a rubber roof. The reason being was the extra maintenance required with a rubber roof, that they only last "X" years, yada yada. Our rig, with a rubber roof, is about the same age as JCat's. I've sealed the original seams with Eternabond as needed over the years and generally just kept the roof clean, inspecting it Spring and Fall. I don't think it'll need to be replaced in the near future, but who knows? So, I'm surprised that a fiberglass roof needs this type of attention after a similar time period. Is this type of deterioration unusual for fiberglass roofs? An inquiring mind would like to know. :) Thanks, ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/07/22 12:17pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: ALWAYS something!

If our second MH had been our first one there never would have been another. I had to chuckle at this. I've always said that if our third child had been our first, she would've been an only child! LOL :) RJL, Yes, it does seem to be "ALWAYS something!". Our rig is now going on 18 years old. Unfortunately, we haven't done any travelling since COVID hit. Not due to COVID entirely, but also that our children were/are transitioning from high school to college to "real life" and coordinating schedules was tough. Plus work got crazy with the all of the COVID BS. Wifey and I have been sleeping in the rig while it's parked on our property, so I know all of the normal "house" systems work, but I'm going to have to give it a good once over on the the chassis and engine mechanicals before we start hitting the road again. I'm sure they'll be a list of things that will need tending before I have any real confidence in it to make a long trip. The first real trip will be to get a Mass State Inspection sticker. LOL But even from the factory, there were some relatively minor issues that needed tending. When we brought it back to the dealer to be corrected, they had one week to deal with 3 relatively simple issues. They addressed 1 of the 3 issues, and even that wasn't done properly, and we needed the rig for a planned trip, so I picked it up and that was it. From that point on I figured I'd just "do it myself". And so I have (except for the Workhorse chassis recalls). Heck, I do all of those things around the house anyway, so it's just "more of the same". We DID order our motorhome with the "cabinet upgrade" so I have to say, the woodwork in our rig is very good. In fact, better than our house (which isn't really saying much, but it's definitely better than the house). The bathroom and bedroom doors are solid, the cabinets are constructed with real wood, not particle board/etc. (Now, if they had put more than a single screw to hold each drawer slide in place at the back of the cabinet, that would've been nice. But an hour with a power screwdriver resolved that issue.) I'm hoping to retire next year so hopefully wifey and I will be taking longer trips. The kids will be in the house so they can take care of it while we're on the road and I'll just have the motorhome to keep worry about. Well...the motorhome and wife...there's some maintenance THERE too! LOL But I wouldn't change it for the world. Truth is, I'm a putterer and "Mr. Fixit" and enjoy repairing things. I view it as a hobby which pays itself off by not requiring to pay others to do things. We both love the RV/Motorhome lifestyle and can't wait until we can get back into it. ~Rick
Rick Jay 09/03/22 11:16am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Backup Camera System Options

I only want one camera, audio not required. I guess my first question is, what exactly are you looking for that the wired options don't offer? As others have said, a wired option will be the best. In my opinion, I would only entertain a wireless option if I had to run the wires for the installation. If the wires are already in place, I'd use them. I also would not write off the need for an audio option. While we don't use it a lot, there have been times when wifey will be directing me backing up the rig and it was nice being able to hear her verbal instructions, especially at night, without yelling loud enough for the entire campground to hear! LOL :) ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/16/22 04:01pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Side door latch/lock won't close without assist...

Hi Chris, Definitely check it with a magnet. Here's the link to Pot Metal from Wikipedia. Basically it's an alloy of various metals which have a low melting point (cheaper to melt at lower temp, and not much strenght) which allows manufacturers to make an inexpensive casting of an object. It usually has little, if any, iron in the mix as that would raise the melting point, which requires more energy to melt, and thus more expensive to produce. The driving force behind pot metal is CHEAP! :) In the link above, an important line is this: "Depending on the exact metals "thrown into the pot," pot metal can become unstable over time, as it has a tendency to bend, distort, crack, shatter, and pit with age. The low boiling point of zinc and fast cooling of newly cast parts often trap air bubbles within the cast part, weakening it." So this kind of makes it a "ticking time-bomb", so to speak. The replacement parts, and I assume the new Tri-Mark locks, use steel for the part which provides considerably more strength and is more ductile and less brittle, so it's very unlikely to crack. And steel, with its high iron content, is magnetic. Hence why a magnet test will easily show which type of metal yours if made from. Hope this helps. ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/13/22 08:40am Tech Issues
RE: Side door latch/lock won't close without assist...

SJ-Chris, I applaud you for your solution to prevent the slider bolt from extending all the way. I could tell from your pics that yours didn't break. However, it WILL break. And this guy named Murphy will tell you that when it does, it will be at the worst possible time. :) You've already closed the door (probably several times) with the slider bolt over-extended. That put lateral stress on that part, and might have already weakened it. That's the problem, when it breaks, there IS no warning. The door does NOT open and you're trapped...either inside or outside. The first time this happened to our rig, I was surprised how many others had the EXACT same problem. And like I said, we pretty much babied the closing of the door...I detest door slammers! LOL Anyway, I believe, there were some folks who sent documentation to the NHTSA to see if Tri-Mark could be forced to fix this as this could conceivable be a life-threatening failure if the lock broke and there was a fire inside the RV. Perhaps a "perfect storm" of problems, but not outside the realm of possibility. We have a driver's door on our Class A, but if the fire is at the front of the rig, that door would be useless. If the main entrance door didn't open, then wifey and I have to try to squeeze our "not so skinny" butts out the emergency window in the bedroom with the requisite "fall" to the ground. LOL Ok, just my line of thinking, but what I paid for that upgraded steel bolt and the peace of mind it provides, I felt it is well worth it. I didn't want to take any chances, and when the kit mentioned above became available, I quickly ordered it and installed it. I'd recommend that you order it. The frustration you save will be your own! ;) Safe travels, ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/12/22 04:57pm Tech Issues
RE: New awning issue

If I'm understanding your description properly, that does not sound correct. The awning should go over the roller to prevent the "pooling" issue that you describe. That would allow water to run off over the roller instead of pooling. Pooling, without a tilt in the awning, could cause damage to the awning if enough water weight built up on it. I don't know if it matters, but is this a manual awning or an electric awning? Would you be able to post a pic? ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/11/22 02:25pm General RVing Issues
RE: Side door latch/lock won't close without assist...

I book marked a E Bay seller a while back that sold a repair kit that may have been mentioned earlier. Trimark Repair Kit That's it!!! Nice work! The website for the part is www.latchfix.com. There's a video which shows how to do the replacement. It looks like it went up in price a bit....but then again, what hasn't? Just make sure it fits the style of Tri-Mark door lock that you have on your rig. If it does, then I highly recommend this product. SJ-Chris, looking at your pictures a bit closer, I'm 95% sure your bolt/plunger is the older pot-metal type. The pot metal is a dull gray in appearance, no shine or gloss to it. If it was the newer model, I believe it would be shinier. I believe you can also check it with a magnet. If a magnet doesn't stick to it, it's the pot metal version. For peace of mind, I'd replace it. Getting locked in OR locked out is not fun, and it happens without warning. That pot metal cracks and it "no worky no more". Good Luck ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/11/22 08:37am Tech Issues
RE: Side door latch/lock won't close without assist...

SJ-Chris, Our rig was built in 2004, and it was about 2014 the original lock mechanism broke. I replaced the entire assembly at that time and it, too, had the pot metal bolt. The video you posted wiped away some cobwebs. I DID buy a new lock assembly the second time, but a few months later someone posted a link to somebody who manufactured new, bolts. I ended up buying one and replacing the one on my second lock set BEFORE it broke. As an FYI, I think Tri-Mark came out with the new model around 2014 or 2015? Maybe? I do know the link of the person selling the new kit was posted on these forums back then. I'll see if I can find it. ~Rick On Edit: No luck finding it yet. I do believe it was a one-man show who designed and built the replacement lock-bolt kit and I believe sold them through E-Bay. Again...cloudy memory. Perhaps with the new design, it wasn't worth him to continue making them? I'll keep looking, though, and if I do find anything, I'll be sure to post it. I think it was $29 or somewhere in that area, which is A LOT cheaper than replacing the entire assembly.
Rick Jay 08/10/22 05:10pm Tech Issues
RE: Side door latch/lock won't close without assist...

Hi, It's been a while since I played "Tri-Mark Lock" on my rig, so I forgot most of the details. Suffice it to say that the plastic part you have was probably what kept the bolt from extending completely. You can try to rig something up that will keep it from extending all the way. BUT....while I can't tell definitively from the pics, it looks like the sliding mechanism might be the style which is made from pot (cast) metal. If that's the case, at this point, I'd highly recommend you replace the entire lock assembly with the new version which has a stronger bolt mechanism. IF that's the pot metal version, it WILL break, it's just a matter of time. And when it does, you're either trapped inside the RV or outside the RV. If you're inside, hope you have a screwdriver handy AND that there isn't a fire. If you're outside, hopefully you have another door into the rig OR you left a large window unlocked and can get in that way. Or call a locksmith. My original lock broke after about 10 years, and we were VERY careful about NOT slamming the door. It's replacement barely lasted four years. I then replaced that one with the new model and (knock on wood), no problems yet. Perhaps someone here has some pics to show more details of where the pot metal failures occur. On mine, it's been at those two thin sections of pot metal with the rectangular hole inside. That's the weakest part and it doesn't take much for it to snap. Good Luck, ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/09/22 06:43am Tech Issues
RE: Rear Fiberglass Cap Damage

TechWriter, I guess the question is...how many more years do you expect to use the rig? The marine grade plywood will probably last 10+ years in that application. Probably longer if you treat it with preservative before it's installed. While it will get wet with road spray, it should also be able to dry. Aluminum or plastic would be permanent...but as you said, there's a price for that. I know if this was me trying to make the decision, I'd probably drive myself nuts trying to decide. If I go with the less expensive plywood option, and then the work done on the back looks A1 perfect, I'd be kicking myself for not using aluminum or plastic. On the other hand, if I put the expensive stuff behind it, and then the back didn't look so good, I'd be kicking myself for spending more than needed. Knowing myself....(after 60 years, I almost do! LOL)...I'd still probably opt for the marine grade plywood option. And SHOULD the back come out better than expected, I'd just spray some wood sealer up there every couple of years...if it even needed it. Well, sounds like you've been assembling a great diversity of advice & opinions and sorting through it all to find a good solution for your needs. I wish you good luck with this project, and I can't wait to see how it turns out! ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/06/22 10:42pm General RVing Issues
RE: Rear Fiberglass Cap Damage

TechWriter, That WAS a series of unfortunate events, for sure. I think that's an AWESOME game plan. I've always liked the look of RV's with a mural on the back. Something your wife creates makes it so much more special! So tell me, are you going to have her paint the grill so it looks like a DP too? ;) While it's probably not necessary, I would recommend that you use marine grade plywood behind the fiberglass. It adds a bit to the price but you won't have to worry about water that splashes up on it from underneath the vehicle degrading the plywood. PLEASE keep us up to date on the repair. I'm really interested in seeing how this turns out for you. ~Rick
Rick Jay 08/06/22 08:35pm General RVing Issues
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