RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'SteveAE' found 22 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 2  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: RV Parking at Hovenweep National Monument

As has been said, it isn't a very busy place and there is plenty of room to turn around. Not all the campground sites are appropriate for larger RV's, but there are a few. In the unlikely event you didn't get a site large enough for your rig, you could just park at the visitor center or along the road. Great, quiet, place to spend a couple days. Have fun.
SteveAE 09/12/19 08:00am Roads and Routes
RE: Which Oregon Highway?

97 is probably faster and busier. Along 97 you can stop at Shanko (an fun, old, town to explore....as long as they haven't "rolled up the sidewalks" for the year yet). 197 has a fairly steep grade dropping down to the Deschutes River and then back up the other side. But, if you wanted to explore the Deschutes river (go rafting, drive down to Shears Falls, check out the White River, etc), then that would be the way to go. If you truly had a day to burn then I would suggest 97 to Shanko, then backtrack the few miles back to 197 and go that route north. Enjoy the journey.
SteveAE 09/10/19 06:02pm Roads and Routes
RE: John Day Fossil Beds NM

Hi. I can't help with the camping (unless you are rafting), but may be able to help with the bug question. It is doubtful that there will be flying bugs (if any, they would be the pesky little black flies). But there will probably be ticks in the grass. So if you bring a dog, I suggest treating him/her with Frontline or similar a week or two prior. Have fun.
SteveAE 02/26/19 08:02am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: How do you guys carry bicycles inside?

I welded up a steel frame and screwed some track it so that the bikes stand vertically, alternating between front tire up and rear tire up. The track (and frame) extends horizontally at the bottom to better support the weight of each bike. There is a bar between the bikes to keep them secure and a large hook up high to hold them in place while I strap the wheels to the trays. Darn thing weighs more than my two bikes....but it is rock solid. Do these bikes have hydraulic brakes? I hang my drop bar bikes upside down in my shop at home because they have mechanical brakes, but I have yet to consider that for the hydraulic brake bikes as my friends who flip their bikes over even to install the wheels have introduced air into the system and I've ended up having to bleed their brakes for them. Mechanical brakes. Since you have such variety of bikes, with different frames and wheels, and can't hang them, maybe you can strap them to appropriately sized tracks that are screwed to the floor and run two more straps (one on each side) from the frame/seat post down to eye bolts in the floor to keep them stable. It will take a lot of space, but it's a simple solution that allows for some flexibility if you get a different bike. Good luck and happy riding.
SteveAE 02/21/19 11:46pm Toy Haulers
RE: How do you guys carry bicycles inside?

I welded up a steel frame and screwed some track it so that the bikes stand vertically, alternating between front tire up and rear tire up. The track (and frame) extends horizontally at the bottom to better support the weight of each bike. There is a bar between the bikes to keep them secure and a large hook up high to hold them in place while I strap the wheels to the trays. Darn thing weighs more than my two bikes....but it is rock solid. My rack bolts to the outside of our travel trailer, but I suppose you could do similar for inside a toy hauler. Indeed, the more I think of it, why not just screw some track to the walls and floor and strap the bikes to that. Maybe put a hook up high to support the upper wheels.
SteveAE 02/21/19 06:53am Toy Haulers
RE: Fiberglass insulation that doesn't stay wet or attract mice?

And Steve, they say that EPS closed cell extruded polystyrene panels don't retain moisture -- is that not true? For example, a styrofoam ice chest seems to be perfectly dry after the ice water is poured out. Dan, Without researching exactly what you are planning on using, I can't say for sure. But I do know that the commonly available white, trade marked, product called "Stryofoam" absorbs moisture. Interesting comment on the ice chest......but I wonder if the ice chest might weigh a bit more after being drained???? Over the years, I have encountered the remains of a number of these ice chests in and alongside rivers and I can say without a doubt, that they are saturated with water. I also have several large panels of Styrofoam here that used to be so saturated with water that I could hardly lift them....before I let them dry out for several years in my barn. Personally I would avoid this product anywhere that it could get wet.
SteveAE 02/17/19 08:38pm Tech Issues
RE: Fiberglass insulation that doesn't stay wet or attract mice?

I assume you know this, but Styrofoam (the white stuff) also absorbs water.....and it takes a very long time to dry out (much longer than spun glass insulation). Of course, if it doesn't get (and stay) wet, you'll probably be fine. Why not use thicker foam (or multiple pieces) where you have the room and thinner foam under your tanks? Under my tanks, I used a piece of 1/2" camping mat with a piece of 1/2" plywood underneath to help support the tanks (the plywood is supported with tubular steel that bolted up to the original tank supports). I also cut lots of small foam pieces with my bandsaw to fit as needed. Glued them in with spray adhesive. Note that most spray adhesives will eat Stroyfoam, but are fine for Blue Board (or similar products designed for below grade use). Don't forget low point drains to get any water out that will eventually find it's way in.....esp. if you tow when it's raining. Great project and I suspect you'll find the floors warmer on your toes when done.
SteveAE 02/17/19 12:20pm Tech Issues
RE: Furnace Noise

I too dislike the noisy, inefficient, furnace. So I mainly just use it for quick warm-ups and then use a catalytic heater (Olympian Wave 6) for the bulk of my heating needs. Opinions differ on catalytic/portable propane space heaters, so do your homework before buying one if that is what you choose to do.
SteveAE 02/09/19 05:14pm Tech Issues
RE: AZ camping in March

There is boondocking available off the road to Thousand Trails, which is off Hwy 260 between Camp Verde and Cottonwood. Also boondocking on FR 525 which is off Hwy 89A between Sedona and Cottonwood. Note that the dispersion camping area off Thousand Trails road has been closed down. :(
SteveAE 01/25/19 08:07pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Vermilion Cliffs

Yes, the weather will determine where you can (should) go. But there's plenty to do and see, so I have no doubt that you'll have an awesome time. Just have some flexibility in your planning.
SteveAE 01/23/19 06:12am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Vermilion Cliffs

I don't know if this will help but here goes: Unless you do the much longer loop (think backpacking), the Paria is (or used to be) a self issue permit at the trail head. It's just a walk down the river. You will be in the water (possibly up to your waist in places). It will be cold and the mud will stick to everything (and the stain will take months to clean out). Don't misunderstand, it's a wonderful place, just go prepared...bring trekking poles and clothes you don't mind either laundering multiple times or just throwing away. As you are aware, The Wave requires a permit...which can be hard to get. You used to be able to get this permit from the Paria Contact Station, not too far from the dirt road that goes down to the Wave trail head. Now (well, once the shutdown ends), you have to go to Kanab for the permit. Kanab is about 40 miles west of the dirt road that leads to the Wave trail head. There is an alternative however...... If you go to the Paria Contact Station, they will call the Paria office and, IF there are any open permits, they will issue it to you from there. Saves 80 miles of driving..... For best "luck" getting a permit however, I suggest you just go to the Kanab BLM office. Good luck. But don't dispair. South Coyote Buttes is also very pretty. It now requires a permit (same office), but the likelihood of getting it is much greater than the Wave (everyone wants the Wave...silly folks....). Keep in mind that, in February, it can be cold down there and there might be some snow (personally, I wouldn't want to wander down the Paria canyon then). Snow isn't a problem, but those roads can turn into a real mess when wet. DO NOT venture down them when there is a lot of rain coming.....unless you want to wait for a day or three until it all drys out. Some awesome options in that area are: - South Coyote Buttes - wander up Cottonwood Canyon Rd. (north) into the Coxcomb (part of Escalante National Monument) - Paria Movie Set (a cool area north of hwy 89...The Wave is South of 89) - Just east of Page is the "New Wave". I have not been there, but it might be worth checking out???? - The visitor center in Big Water (assuming the gov. shutdown is over) is well worth a stop and they can make suggestions on where to explore. - You are aware of Antalope Cyn., but IF you have a boat, Antelope Canyon can also be accessed from Lake Powell. Not the same, but it's free....... There is just so much to do down there. Headed back to that area (again) for a couple months in March ourselves. If you are into getting books, check out this one. I doubt that you will be disappointed. Oh yea, this is an El Nino year so they are getting lots of moisture down there (at the present). Might be something you want to factor in (watch out for those dirt roads in the rain!) Hope this helps and ......... have fun.
SteveAE 01/21/19 06:18pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Leveling with half of a Lynx block??

I switched to the Andersen Camper Leveler awhile back and am very pleased for all but extreme leveling situations. I put a big level on the front of my trailer and simply watch it as I pull onto the levelers. Way faster than the lego style blocks or boards. The only situation I have had difficulties using this product on is slick surfaces (which I seldom camp on anyway), where the levelers sometimes slip. A piece of rubber mat under each leveler solves this. Now I just use the lego blocks under my stabilizers.
SteveAE 01/11/19 01:27am Tech Issues
RE: City of Grants Pass OR

When I read the ordinance, it seemed to only be referring to camping on public property and on private property without the owners permission. "5.61.050 Removal of Campsite on Private Property Upon discovery of a campsite on private property without the consent of the owner, ......." I would assume you have permission to park on your parents property, so why don't you just park in their driveway or lawn and not worry about it? Best of luck with your folks.
SteveAE 12/26/18 11:05pm Truck Campers
RE: What is the max length travel trailer you think is practical

Interesting reading the answers to your post with quite a number of them pinging the 25' range (not always clear if they mean box length or total length though). I think it really depends: - what you expect your "camping experience" to be like (i.e.; are you happy sitting at the dinette all the time or do you "want" a separate seating area). - how many people (don't forget visitors and pets) and how much "personal space" (i.e.; privacy) you want. - where you want to go (boondocking, public CG's, private CG's) - the season and how much time you intend to spend inside vs. outside. - how flexible with travel plans you want to be. - the floor plan of the trailer (one big open space vs. interior walls). - what you are lucky enough to find when shopping. - many other variables that I can't think of right now. Our 22' box (with one slide) trailer has no room dividers (except the bathroom of course). And we find that about half the time it is either too big or too small with the the other half of the time being just right (sort of like the three bears story). Of course, this may change as we get older and/or we stop preferring to boondock, but for now, this length works well for us (keep in mind that we are backpackers and rafters so are comfortable living with less). It is interesting to see that our trailer length jives about right with my earlier observation on the ~25' length being the most often mentioned in the responses to your post. My guess though is that, whatever length you eventually do get, you will conclude that it is perfect.....for you. Happy shopping.
SteveAE 12/26/18 08:11am Travel Trailers
RE: Small scale heat tape project -- is this possible?

Don, Good catch. Thanks for keeping me honest (written early in the morning when I was worried about my dog in surgery) power goes down by the square of the voltage. 120 x 120= 14400 12 X 12 = 144 So heat output at 12 volts is 1/100, not 1/10. Here's another thought. I have never tried this, but I see no reason why it shouldn't work for the temps you experienced as long as you insulate the pipe. Wrap the shortest Home Depot heat tape around the pipe (they are intended to be laid on the pipe, not wrapped) and power it with 12 volts. No, it won't get as warm (it will get about 1/10th as warm....maybe a little warmer since you wrapped it), but if you leave it on all night and your pipe is insulated, I suspect that you will be fine for temps into the single digits. And, if it doesn't work, then simply just power it with your inverter (120 volts) and use a timer to cycle it on/off.
SteveAE 11/21/18 02:23pm Tech Issues
RE: Small scale heat tape project -- is this possible?

Here's another thought. I have never tried this, but I see no reason why it shouldn't work for the temps you experienced as long as you insulate the pipe. Wrap the shortest Home Depot heat tape around the pipe (they are intended to be laid on the pipe, not wrapped) and power it with 12 volts. No, it won't get as warm (it will get about 1/10th as warm....maybe a little warmer since you wrapped it), but if you leave it on all night and your pipe is insulated, I suspect that you will be fine for temps into the single digits. And, if it doesn't work, then simply just power it with your inverter (120 volts) and use a timer to cycle it on/off.
SteveAE 11/21/18 03:03am Tech Issues
RE: Small scale heat tape project -- is this possible?

Dan, I understand. Just looking for other options that might help. Yes, heat tape will work. Heck, just get a short length of 120 v tape at Home Depot, cut the thermostat off, and run it from your inverter. Losses really won't be that much, especially if your inverter is controlled by a timer so it is only on for a couple times a night, for an hour or so at a time. Don't forget to insulate the pipe or all this will be a waste. My experience is that it doesn't get too hot for fex type plumbing.....even when then that plumbing is insulated. As to your recirculating system, am guessing you just have a valve that you open and close by hand. If so, you could replace that manual valve with one that is controlled by a solenoid (~15.00). Then just use a timer (unknown price as I built my own) to activate it. Another thought. If I remember correctly, you prefer to save battery power by keeping the inside of your trailer cool (er, cold) at night. Perhaps if you heated the inside of the trailer, maybe even directed some heat into the problem area with a fan, and insulated the pipe, the problem would go away. Yea, I know, the darn furnace draws a lot of power.....much more than heat tape does. So just install a Wave Heater (and an second CO detector). Not only "might" your freezing problem go away, but no more cold noses and toes too. You can use the thermostat you cut off the heat tape to control a fan (it's just a switch).
SteveAE 11/20/18 04:57pm Tech Issues
RE: Small scale heat tape project -- is this possible?

Is the trouble area included in your recirculation loop?
SteveAE 11/20/18 06:14am Tech Issues
RE: Towing in snow?

We regularly tow (and camp) in the snow. Four wheel drive, good M&S tires and slow down. Perhaps it's my hitch (Hensley), but I find I slide less going around turns...much less than when not towing. And, when I do, it's fairly easy to correct. I find the increase in braking distance to be the biggest change (be prepared to slide if you hit the brakes too hard...). Have fun and enjoy the journey.
SteveAE 10/10/18 07:28pm Towing
RE: Whitewater Draw, Az

I believe the overflow parking is ~1.1 mile north off Coffman road and is called the "Sportsman Access" Plug these coordinates into Google maps and look at the satellite view: 31.576579, -109.716533 It would just be a spot to dump the rig and then drive in (there is quite a bit of non-RV parking available at Whitewater Draw).
SteveAE 10/01/18 07:51pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 2  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS