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 > Your search for posts made by 'Teleman' found 118 matches.

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RE: Question about Redarc 40A DC to DC charger wiring.

I put circuit breakers on both sides of the charger too. I'm pretty confident I won't have any trouble.Circuit breakers and fuses are very imprecise devices. A batch of 60a breakers/fuses of the same type, from the same manufacturer, may open at 70a, 85a, or even higher. It's wishful thinking to assume a 60a breaker/fuse is going to open at 61a. Breakers/fuses are primarily designed to protect in the event of a short or massive overload condition. They don't have the precision necessary to effectively protect an alternator or battery from all over-current conditions. BTW, the Redarc instruction manual (pg 10) states it does not recommend the use of self-resetting circuit breakers. They recommend the use of low-resistance MIDI fuses. They are not self resetting.
Teleman 11/22/21 09:21am Tech Issues
RE: Question about Redarc 40A DC to DC charger wiring.

The starting battery between the alternator and DC-DC cushions the load on the alternator during the odd low output idle time one would think. This DC DC probably has some control around overloading the alternator. Especially REDARC equipment- Australia has been a decade or two ahead of north North America using on board charging equipment in campers and trucks operating in remote regions. I put circuit breakers on both sides of the charger too. I'm pretty confident I won't have any trouble.
Teleman 11/21/21 05:44pm Tech Issues
RE: Question about Redarc 40A DC to DC charger wiring.

Worked as it should. The starting battery voltage is too low to turn the charger on but as soon as the alternator is engaged the voltage is sufficient. Everything works like it should and yes i installed a LiFePo battery. That was the reason for the DC to DC charger.Glad to hear your install went well. We used a battery isolator to activate our dc to dc charger. We installed our BI (and dc to dc charger) inside our truck camper (vs. the truck) so the truck's battery is only subjected to parasitic current when the TC is connected to the truck. It'll be interesting to see how your 124a alternator handles the 40-45a dc to dc charger input load for the long haul---especially if you have any plans to charge while idling. Enjoy! Pretty much the only time we're idling is at stoplights. When we're not driving we use the generator to charge the batteries.
Teleman 11/21/21 08:23am Tech Issues
RE: Question about Redarc 40A DC to DC charger wiring.

Worked as it should. The starting battery voltage is too low to turn the charger on but as soon as the alternator is engaged the voltage is sufficient. Everything works like it should and yes i installed a LiFePo battery. That was the reason for the DC to DC charger.
Teleman 11/20/21 06:23pm Tech Issues
RE: Question about Redarc 40A DC to DC charger wiring.

Well I suppose I should have just Google it first. I most certainly have a fixed voltage alternator. t alternators vs fixed voltage alternators   Fixed voltage alternators are becoming less common on new vehicles as reduced fuel consumption targets and more stringent environmental and emissions standards are adopted by manufacturers. A fixed voltage alternator has a high enough voltage to charge a secondary battery in the vehicle to a usable level for leisure or auxiliary use. The smart alternator system, also known as variable voltage alternators, allow the vehicle to control the output voltage and current from the alternator based on vehicle operating conditions. The idea behind this is to reduce electrical load and in turn mechanical load on the engine by the alternator. Unfortunately, this renders it unsuitable for charging a secondary battery system to a usable level.   How do I tell if I have a smart alternator?   Smart alternators are par for the course in most modern vehicles, but when measuring or monitoring output voltage from a vehicle with a variable voltage alternator you will find the voltage can range between 12.3V-15V. It’s not easy to tell if it’s a variable voltage alternator by only measuring voltage as sometimes the result may be deceiving or look similar to a standard alternator at time of testing.  A good way to determine whether your vehicle has a variable voltage alternator is to look at the vehicle start battery. What you are looking for is a module mounted on or close to the battery terminal (usually the battery negative). This is the battery sensor, if it’s got one of these, you have a variable voltage alternator.
Teleman 11/20/21 08:47am Tech Issues
RE: Question about Redarc 40A DC to DC charger wiring.

See if there is a tag or plate attached to the alternator frame somewhere. I would guess it is a Delco sumthin sumthin on your GM engine. A good GM commercial vehicle dealership parts dept might be able to discover the original equipment alternator model from the engine number or chassis number build info. Is there an original build line sheet deep in the file folder from Airstream? I'll look through the paperwork. I need to know more about the two types of alrenators.
Teleman 11/20/21 08:41am Tech Issues
Question about Redarc 40A DC to DC charger wiring.

In the instructions it says: The BLUE wire is used to switch the vehicle input turn ON trigger mode between: • Standard trigger (for fixed voltage or temperature compensating alternators) • Low Voltage trigger (for variable voltage alternators) Standard trigger the blue wire is disconnected Low voltage trigger the blue wire is connected to the ignition My question is which kind of alternator do I have? My motorhome is a 2000 Airstream Land Yacht Class A with the 7.4 Vortec and a 124A alternator. Any ideas, or how I can find out?
Teleman 11/20/21 12:53am Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

Teleman, Another reason to have a bypass circuit is for a "poor mans" boost switch. If the chassis batteries are dead, you would be able to get some amps into them from the "house" bank. Don't have it "active" when starting. The Li bms will NOT like it. If the alternator did fail, then that bypass circuit could be used to keep the engine running a lot longer while getting to a service center. Of course the Redarc ought to be turned off to do this. What kind of switch do you use? I take it using the house battery boost switch as is isn't recommended? I carry a jump start battery pack too. Hi Teleman, I use this type: https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NW_786125?impressionRank=3 I like it because I store it with the "key" hanging on a string. It would be nearly impossible to turn it on by accident. Maximum load up to 300 Amp @ 24 Volt DC. https://i.ebayimg.com/thumbs/images/g/aFQAAOSw1nVd2Frz/s-l225.webp width=395 OK thanks. Do you place it between the staring battery and the charger or the charger and house battery? How did you mount it?
Teleman 11/14/21 09:13am Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

Teleman, Another reason to have a bypass circuit is for a "poor mans" boost switch. If the chassis batteries are dead, you would be able to get some amps into them from the "house" bank. Don't have it "active" when starting. The Li bms will NOT like it. If the alternator did fail, then that bypass circuit could be used to keep the engine running a lot longer while getting to a service center. Of course the Redarc ought to be turned off to do this. What kind of switch do you use? I take it using the house battery boost switch as is isn't recommended? I carry a jump start battery pack too. Hi Teleman, I use this type: https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NW_786125?impressionRank=3 I like it because I store it with the "key" hanging on a string. It would be nearly impossible to turn it on by accident. Maximum load up to 300 Amp @ 24 Volt DC. https://i.ebayimg.com/thumbs/images/g/aFQAAOSw1nVd2Frz/s-l225.webp width=395 OK thanks.
Teleman 11/14/21 08:26am Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

. . . Can it be limited to 20 amps if need be? . . . This could potentially be an important feature consideration. It'll be interesting to see if the 124a alternator has the headroom to handle the additional ~40a load for the long haul. I'll have to look into it. I was originally looking at a 25A unit but that would have been inadequate for 400 watts of solo panels, which I plan to install next spring. That would not be a switch. It would be a feature on the dc to DC charger. Sorry that wasn't meant for you. Since edited.
Teleman 11/14/21 08:09am Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

Teleman, That is a good decision. Can it be limited to 20 amps if need be? It is a far superior make. Another reason to have a bypass circuit is for a "poor mans" boost switch. If the chassis batteries are dead, you would be able to get some amps into them from the "house" bank. Don't have it "active" when starting. The Li bms will NOT like it. If the alternator did fail, then that bypass circuit could be used to keep the engine running a lot longer while getting to a service center. Of course the Redarc ought to be turned off to do this. What kind of switch do you use? I take it using the house battery boost switch as is isn't recommended? I carry a jump start battery pack too.
Teleman 11/14/21 08:03am Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

. . . Can it be limited to 20 amps if need be? . . . This could potentially be an important feature consideration. It'll be interesting to see if the 124a alternator has the headroom to handle the additional ~40a load for the long haul. I'll have to look into it. I was originally looking at a 25A unit but that would have been inadequate for 400 watts of solo panels, which I plan to install next spring.
Teleman 11/14/21 08:01am Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

After having the chance to investigate further I decided to return the Renogy unit and bite the bullet and get a Redarc 40A waterproof charger. It's $320 more but it's really the best solution. Trying to figure out a way to keep the Renogy dry was pretty much impossible without moving it to a basement. This way I can place it right next to the house battery and only a few feet from the starting battery. It also has a solar input with an MPPT regulator so when I add solar panels eventually I won't have the added expense of one.
Teleman 11/13/21 08:39pm Tech Issues
RE: Battery tray for LifePo 200AH Battery?

A wet battery is no problem. I looked, but could not find a tray that size or even close to that size. Me neither. I guess most RVs have slide out trays for batteries large enough to accomodate these big guys. I was surprised my house batteries were up front under the hood when I bought it.
Teleman 11/11/21 04:45pm Tech Issues
RE: Battery tray for LifePo 200AH Battery?

This box should work for you. I prefer a tray if that's ok. The battery will get wet but that shouldn't be a problem correct?
Teleman 11/11/21 01:39pm Tech Issues
RE: Battery tray for LifePo 200AH Battery?

I just bought a LifePo battery to replace my two lead acid deep cycle batteries and I'm having trouble finding a hold down tray for it. It measures 20.5x9.4x8.5 inchs. Any ideas? got any pictures of where the batteries were? Steve No but they are behind the grill and separated from the engine by a firewall as it's a Class A motorhome.
Teleman 11/11/21 12:26pm Tech Issues
Battery tray for LifePo 200AH Battery?

I just bought a LifePo battery to replace my two lead acid deep cycle batteries and I'm having trouble finding a hold down tray for it. It measures 20.5x9.4x8.5 inchs. The bottom is 19"x9". Any ideas?
Teleman 11/11/21 06:49am Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

If I can mount it in a plastic box safely I can keep the wires really short, 12-18", as the starter and house batteries are located very close to each other under the hood. Renogy recommendso 6ga from the starter battery up to 8' and a 60a fuse, and 8ga and a 50a fuse to the house battery. If there is room--use a plastic battery box to hold the renogy. Make sure there is plenty of ventilation. dc to DC are not wonderfully efficient so the unit may need to dissipate over 250 watts of heat. One minor concern. Is the starter battery flooded? If so the renogy should not be in the same compartment (corrosion will eat the renogy up). If the starter is AGM, then that's ok for the renogy to be in the same compartment. I use auto reset circuit breakers rather than fuses. I have dual 50amp charging paths (an attempt to improve charging before dc to DC devices were available). I've seen 70 amps--back in the old days when I had flooded house batteries (975 amp hours). I would use my inverter while running down the road and turn on the water heater. I used a duty cycle of 20 minutes on and 40 minutes off. I have manual control over the isolation solenoids. Can you recommend or share links to the circuit breakers? I need a 60a and 50a. Thanks!
Teleman 11/09/21 05:06pm Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

Thanks for all the helpful advice. I'll be sure to use adequate wire, proper fuses or circuit breakers, and make sure the charger is ventilated and protected.
Teleman 11/08/21 10:16pm Tech Issues
RE: LiFePo battery upgrade question

I ordered a 200AH LifePo battery to replace my two 100AH lead acid batteries and also a compatabile converter which takes care of charging the battery with shore or generator power but what about charging the battery with the alternator? Does the battery's BMS take care of everything and therefore no need to change or upgrade the alternator? Sorry if this is a dumb question!A BMS is not designed to function as a charger. It is designed as final line of defense to protect the battery. If you're counting on the wiring to/from the alternator to limit current between your alternator and batteries, you're going to have to choose the proper gauge wire or cable. Too big (physically), may allow excessive current (potentially overloading both the alternator and/or battery). Too little current will result in excessive charge times. There's no magical chart that's going to give you a precise answer. If you've priced copper wire lately, a trial and error approach could get very expensive. Also, if you change size/type of batteries in the future, you'll need to current match the wiring again. That's one of the upsides to using a dc to dc charger. It will limit current to a precise amount. Sized properly, you're never in danger of overloading your alternator, plus it will properly charge your lifepo4 by precisely controlling the voltage applied to the battery. IMO $200-$300 for a dc to dc charger is a good insurance to protect both your motorhome and battery. As for using a fuse as an alternator/battery current limiting device, that's not recommended. Fuses are very inexact devices. Some fuses can allow up to twice their current rating before they open. Fuses are primarily designed to protect in the event of a direct short. What should I be looking for in a DC to DC charger given a 124A alternator and a 200AH lithium battery? I suppose it's possible I may add a second battery in the future as my motorhomes has space for two.I think pianotuna has been giving you some solid advice. I'd have to agree with his choice of a 20a dc to dc charger to use with his alternator which he described as similar to yours. Since you're going with a 40a, it's important to keep the voltage drop between the battery/alternator and your dc to dc charger to an absolute minimum (a voltage drop calculator can help determine the proper gauge wire/cable to use). Any significant voltage drop can push the input current to a 40a dc to dc charger as high as 60a. IMO, 60a is way too much load for a 124a alternator--especially if you have a scenario where you have discharged engine and house batteries, headlights on, a/c on, etc. all at the same time. FWIW, the 20a dc to dc charger under the same max load scenario would draw 30a. If you do run into problems with your 40a you do have the option (as pianotuna also mentioned) of resetting a dip-switch on the outside case to drop it into half-power mode so it will operate just like the 20a Renogy. Lastly, keep in mind the Renogy is not a sealed unit. It has a couple cooling fans that force air (along with any dust and dirt) inside the case. If you mount the dc to dc charger inside a dusty engine compartment this is something to be aware of (along with any water intrusion issues). FWIW, we mounted 40a our dc to dc charger (truck has a 220a alternator) inside our truck camper and made a ~20 ft 2-gauge run from our truck's battery terminals to the dc to dc charger located inside the truck camper. With 40a of charge current we only experience a 43.5a load on the alternator. Larger (physical size) wires/cables decrease the load on the alternator (decreased voltage drop) while still maintaining 40a of charge current. Good luck with your install! If I can mount it in a plastic box safely I can keep the wires really short, 12-18", as the starter and house batteries are located very close to each other under the hood. Renogy recommendso 6ga from the starter battery up to 8' and a 60a fuse, and 8ga and a 50a fuse to the house battery.
Teleman 11/08/21 07:56pm Tech Issues
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