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 > Your search for posts made by 'Thetruck454' found 3 matches.

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RE: First TT advice

1590 - your family (going to guess 500 lbs adjust as you like -100 lbs for hitch - whatever you have in the car (going to guess 250 lbs adjust accordingly_ =740 left of your payload 740/1.15 = 4933 lbs gvwr. I don't know your weight numbers but I suspect you are way out of payload It's just me and my wife so including stuff in the Durango and the hitch I wouldn't think I'd use enough payload to eat into that 870 tongue weight cap. First off, forget all the bravado talk about how much power your Durango has, as in how it laughs at trailers... Power has nothing to do with being able to tow safely and under control. In fact, having a lot of power in an other wise towing challenged platform can just get you in trouble faster. Some well regarded TVs in the past such as the early Dodge/Cummins and Ford Powerstrokes were far more capable than your Durango, with much less power. That said, you do seem to realize that your limitation will be payload. In my situation, I have a 1 ton dually CC, So I don't pay a lot of attention to it.... But you NEED to KNOW your numbers everytime, as you will be cutting it close. This is difficult with a TT, as normal usage can drastically alter the TW of the TT in the course of a trip. Propane gets consumed and disappears, FW leaves its tank and ends up in the black/grey tanks. Food/drink gets consumed and leaves the pantry/fridge, and ends up in the black tank. Clothes get used, an leave the closets ending up in the hamper etc. Many other items may ride home in a different location than they started the out on the trip. So you need to know your weights..No guessing or estimating. Get it weighed (Durango and TT) ready to camp, at the heaviest you will ever be. Figure out where your TW needs to be. Then get and USE a Sherline TW scale Everytime you hitch up. Doing this will allow you to make any needed adjustments BEFORE getting on the highway and finding out the hard way that your TW is too low. Be safe out there. Happy camping I actually have one of those Sherline TW scales in my amazon cart as we speak. I'm thinking of getting one of othe OBDII Haul gauges to use after I cross reference it to actual weighting the trailer and Durango to make sure that Haul gauge is accurate. You are right power only gets you going, stopping and maneuvering the trailer is really where a vehicle has to work to handle a trailer. I know it may have sounded as if all I was talking about was the power of the Durango SRT, but I was also referring to how well the suspension and rest of the vehicle took it. I've towed a much larger trailer with a half ton truck that was comparable when looking at trailer weight vs max trailer weight and it yanked that half ton around a lot more than the Durango. I was truly surprised just how planted the vehicle was. I've talked to similar people that towed closer to the 8700# cap with the SRT and they had similar observation on how well it handled the load. As long as the tongue weight or payload isn't exceeded I bet it would surprise any "truck guy" with how confidently it tows. I know because I used to be one that only ever owned trucks and I was impressed. Are you a family or just a couple? We fell in love with the Coachman 192 RBS Just a couple... with two fur-kids aka two cats haha ^Mitch.....and the wheelbarrow legs (the rear axle in your example) now have 0 weight on-them because your wdh (arms) put the weight more on the front axle and trailer. My only issue with using the SRT Durango is the fancy self leveling and adjustable damping is not made to, imo, manage a heavy trailer with a large duty cycle and that stuff is expensive. Aside from wear n tear on that, any reasonable sub 1000lb tongue weight with a wdh will work great. And the rest of the vehicle is more capable than a 2500 Hemi (engine, trans and brakes) Thank you, I don't think many people realize how well set up the Durango SRT is. It's definitely going to cost a lot more in wear and tear to tow than a 2500, but it sure won't fuss about it in the process. Also to challenge the general consensus, The "technical" articles I've read in regards to towing all say to count the weight of the WDH for payload and GAWR, but DO NOT count it towards tongue weight. To be safe you can count the weight of the spring bars and the brackets that attach to the trailer tongue, but that's it. Unless the manufacturers are rating the actual weight applied to the reciever, they are referencing the weight applied vertically to the hitch at the center point of the ball. I'm referencing the thread on this forum https://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/14265335.cfm Based on this thread, if I tow a trailer with a WDH with a tongue weight less than 870# (as measured at the hitch with a Sherline TW scale or similar not including the weight of the WDH) and total weight less is than 8700# AND both the front ant rear GAWR GVW and GCWR of the tow vehicle are not exceeded I'm technically in the green. I'm curious where everyone is getting to add the weight of the WDH to the tongue weight?
Thetruck454 09/21/19 10:01pm Travel Trailers
RE: First TT advice

Thanks for the responses everyone. I should have mentioned the vehicle occupancy in that first post. All I'll have is myself, my soon to be wife, and a couple cats. Don't have kids and neither of us want them so my payload probably won't be much. If and that's a big IF we have another couple camp with us I'd expect them to be in their own vehicle. As far as extra stuff I figure I have the flexibility to put it in the trailer to reduce tow vehicle payload or put it in the Durango if I need to shift it there. I've seen those fold down racks on the back of the trailer to store stuff so I would think that adds minimal tongue weight if not removes some. The catch being I don't want to take off tougue weight below 10%. On the safe side I bet I could assume 500# of stuff in the Durango, so that leaves me 1100# to play with for tongue weight, which is more than I can use while keeping the tongue weight below 870#. When I look at trailers looks like I should add to the criteria the GVW can't start with a 7 based on what everyone is saying.
Thetruck454 09/19/19 05:43pm Travel Trailers
First TT advice

Long winded first post, but here we go: I’m looking for a travel trailer to tow with my Durango SRT. I know ideally you pick the trailer first, then the tow vehicle, but I unfortunately put the cart before the horse (although technically I have the horse and now am looking for the cart). I have experience towing enclosed cargo trailers and open trailers with my previous trucks so towing isn’t new to me. With the Durango SRT I’ve only towed a 7x18 enclosed cargo trailer weighing 4000# and it laughed at it. With a 475hp 392 hemi, it has more than enough power. It was more fun than it should be taking off from a stop light cracking of 5k+ rpm upshifts and out accelerating cars next to you all while towing a trailer. The back end is so planted you don’t really feel the effects of the cross winds and there is zero pogoing effect over bumps (tow mode stiffens the rear adjustable Bilstien stocks to help control the trailer while leaving the fronts on soft). As far as braking the Durango has a factory brake controller and the trailer had electric brakes, but the Durango has 6 piston Brembo’s up front and 4 piston Brembo’s on back so it has significant stopping power. I also towed the same cargo trailer with a significant quantity of cargo (both middle seat and back seat down) and aside from squatting the back end enough to make me concerned, it displayed the same confident control as towing the trailer without the extra cargo. This tells me the Durango’s towing weakness is not the trailer weight, but is the tongue weight so I’ll definitely need a WDH with a TT. The Durango has a towing capacity of 8700# with a maximum tongue weight of 870#. GVW is 7100#, vehicle weight is 5510#, and payload is listed as 1590#. When looking at travel trailers I’m finding plenty of ones that fit my needs while keeping the GVW (not the underestimated dry weight) under the 8700#. What does have me nervous is a lot of them list a significant (for the Durango) tongue weight. When looking at dry hitch weights, I’m figuring in 2 full propane tanks @ 35# a piece, a couple batteries weighing 50#, a WDH, plus a honey pot and whatever cargo I’d put in the under bed storage so that means I’m going to add an easy 250# to the tongue. With that being said I’m ruling out travel trailers that list a dry hitch weight of over 600# to be safe. One thing I have found is some 5000# TT’s have a dry hitch weight of well over 600# yet some 6000# TT’s have a dry hitch weight of 550# or less. In looking to keep the tongue weight low I’m looking at TT’s that have the bathroom and kitchen over or behind the trailer axles which should mean at least the gray and black tank should also be over or behind the trailer axles. The Heartland trailer’s I’ve found that fit my needs all while appearing to be within the Durango’s towing limits are the North Trail 22FBS (Dry weight of 5497#, dry hitch 395#, GVW 6900#), the North Trail 27RBDS (Dry weight of 6354#, dry hitch 572#, GVW 7400#), and the North Trail 28RKDS (Dry weight of 6780#, dry hitch 542#, GVW 8600#). I really like the Mallard M260 (Dry weight of 5866#, dry hitch 674#, GVW 6900#), but the dry hitch weight has me nervous so I ruled it out. I guess my questions to the forum are: Is the ratio of trailer weigh to hitch weight something that significantly changes when you load it up? Should I be worried about 6000# plus dry trailer that lists a sub 600# dry hitch weight? Can anyone see any flaws or wrong assumptions in my approach or have any other suggestions?
Thetruck454 09/19/19 10:42am Travel Trailers
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