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 > Your search for posts made by 'avarusbrightfyre' found 48 matches.

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RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

There are 24 volt LI battery packs. https://battlebornbatteries.com/shop/50ah-24v-lifepo4-deep-cycle-battery/ Much appreciated. However, the max continuous amps is 60, which would still require 2 batteries to handle the expected loads.
avarusbrightfyre 04/07/20 11:16pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

At 24 volts, the amps are all cut in half..... Since I'd need 2 batteries anyway, it is starting to make sense to do a 24v system. Does this sound right?Keep in mind the 24v isn't any magic where it nets you any more wattage or battery life. It simply means you don't have to size your wire to carry the huge 12v amp loads.Your problem seems to be that you need 440 AH of bank like the rest of us who do a lot of 12v stuff and you don't want to carry that much weight. .He's talking about Lifepos. Yeah, I understand that. Just trying to figure out the minimum system I need to safely run everything in the trailer without damaging anything. If my numbers are correct, it seems like I need 2 batteries minimum to either spread the load in parallel or reduce the amps in series. Or just having to constantly remind six other people not to use the microwave if anything else is on.
avarusbrightfyre 04/07/20 07:46pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

Ok, let me see if my understanding makes sense. At 12 volts, assuming a 3000w inverter, at max load that would be 3000w/12v for a total of 250 amps. However, other than my air conditioner, I believe my 900 watt microwave is the highest load I'd have, which would be 900w/12v for a total of 75 amps. The only other appliances would be the fridge and water heater on gas, my TV and sound bar, lights, and other miscellaneous low power items. Let's say no more than 1500 watts total at any given time for a max amp draw of 125. Might be a low estimate, but that's still over the 100 amp continuous limit for one battery, so I would need a minimum of 2 batteries to spread that load safely. At 24 volts, the amps are all cut in half. Max amps of 125 under full inverter load, which I don't think I'd ever reach without running the air conditioner, and 63 amps at the more reasonable 1500 watt level. Since I'd need 2 batteries anyway, it is starting to make sense to do a 24v system. Does this sound right?
avarusbrightfyre 04/07/20 06:24pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

"Lifepo4 chemistry" I have read that some folks have and it was no big deal, most seasonal campers aren't cycling them a whole lot in the season. I have also read of folks that have batteries that are like mine made up of individual cells (not pre-made dropins) that have had a cell start to go south after a few years of heavy use and replace that individual cell with no harm. This is why it's advisable to be able for individual cell monitoring not just the battery as a whole. I had originally considered building a battery, but once you factor in the BMS the overall cost savings wasn't enough to offset the additional effort required to put it all together. If I could get quality cells for like $100 each and a decent BMS for around $100, then it would definitely be worth the effort to go that route.
avarusbrightfyre 04/07/20 11:38am Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

Can you add Li batts over the years? Not a good idea with lead-acid batts. You want them all to be in the same condition--usually achieved by buying them at the same time. I'm not sure, but I would imagine it depends on the battery chemistry. My understanding is that lithium iron phosphate batteries are very different from lithium ion batteries.
avarusbrightfyre 04/07/20 10:20am Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

However, to get a 48 volt system would require four batteries...24v only requires two. 36 isn't very common. Agreed, I would skip from 24v to 48v if I decided it needed. However, decent lithium batteries are still up around $1,000 per unit, so even two batteries is a very large up front purchase. I'm trying to build my system over time to spread out the cost. Sticking with a 12v system, at least at first, will allow me to get started with one battery and slowly build capacity over time as needed. Buying one battery at a time will also allow me to figure out how much capacity I need in reality rather than how I live right now. I use a lot of power when on the grid, but that's with the fridge and water heater on AC power, and my big gaming computer on several hours per day. Starting to live on one battery will let me know what I am willing to live without and increase the system size from there as desired. I won't say as needed, lol.
avarusbrightfyre 04/07/20 09:42am Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

If the inverter only has to go from 48 volts up to 120 volts it works a LOT less harder. If I were starting over, I would not use a 12 volt inverter. That makes sense. However, to get a 48 volt system would require four batteries, and I'm trying to go the LifePo4 route to save on space and weight since you can use at least 90% of the capacity. That's a lot of money up front that I don't have.
avarusbrightfyre 04/06/20 08:31pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

Wouldn't increasing to 24 or 48 volts require more batteries to reach the same capacity? I believe I would need twice number the batteries at 24 volts to get the same number of amp hours as a 12 volt setup. I plan on mounting the inverter right next to the batteries and using big fat cables to minimize heat. You do need twice as many batteries to have the same charge capacity (measured in Amp-hours). You do not need twice as many batteries to have the same energy storage (measured in watt-hours), and it's energy that you're ultimately using. Since the voltage to the inverter is greater, the current it requires for the same output is proportionally lower, and so your amp-hour requirements--but not your watt-hour requirements--are also correspondingly lower. Incidentally, this is basically the same reason why power company distribution lines operate at high voltages: they need to carry much lower currents to supply the same amount of power, and so they can use reasonably sized wires and still have acceptably low line losses. What about the DC side of the trailer? I would need to step it back down to 12 volts on that side, and wouldn't that bring the capacity back down to what it would have been in a 12v system? When step down from 24V to 12V, you will get roughly 2x the current out at 12V than goes in at 24V (minus any efficiency losses). Capacity is not lost, just reshaped when using a higher voltage for your storage. So 100AH at 24V would yield 200AH at 12V. I guess that makes sense. It just feels counter intuitive somehow. I know the formula, but it just doesn't click for me, I guess. I can see the benefit of using higher voltages on a homestead or something similar where you might need to run longer cables, but does it make sense for an RV setup where the inverter is right next to the batteries?
avarusbrightfyre 04/06/20 04:13pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

Wouldn't increasing to 24 or 48 volts require more batteries to reach the same capacity? I believe I would need twice number the batteries at 24 volts to get the same number of amp hours as a 12 volt setup. I plan on mounting the inverter right next to the batteries and using big fat cables to minimize heat. You do need twice as many batteries to have the same charge capacity (measured in Amp-hours). You do not need twice as many batteries to have the same energy storage (measured in watt-hours), and it's energy that you're ultimately using. Since the voltage to the inverter is greater, the current it requires for the same output is proportionally lower, and so your amp-hour requirements--but not your watt-hour requirements--are also correspondingly lower. Incidentally, this is basically the same reason why power company distribution lines operate at high voltages: they need to carry much lower currents to supply the same amount of power, and so they can use reasonably sized wires and still have acceptably low line losses. What about the DC side of the trailer? I would need to step it back down to 12 volts on that side, and wouldn't that bring the capacity back down to what it would have been in a 12v system?
avarusbrightfyre 04/06/20 01:25pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

Quick update on my situation. I opened up the breaker panel again yesterday trying to decide whether I wanted to figure out how to wire the inverter into the panel instead of doing an outlet. I'm starting to think the continuing hassle of only being able to use the inverter with the RV power cord plugged in could become tedious. If we want to make a quick stop for lunch or something, I don't know that I want to have to haul out the big heavy cable just to use the microwave. Turns out that almost all of the things I want to run on the inverter were already on the left leg of the main 50 amp breaker. Only thing missing was the microwave, but fortunately the electric fireplace (which was on the right leg) and the microwave both had 15 amp breakers, so I was able to easily swap the wiring and now everything the inverter would power is on the left leg now, and the remaining items will only power up when connected to shore power. This means I won't have to figure out splitting the single hot wire from the inverter to both legs of the system. The cool thing is that I have a breaker for the converter, which is on the right leg, which will by default be unpowered when the RV is being powered by the inverter...assuming I decide against doing the shore power plugged into outlet route. I was going to install a relay to automatically cut power to the converter when the inverter is on, but this would automatically solve that problem for me. So I guess now I need to settle on a different inverter and figure out the best way to swap between shore power and the inverter. I was considering a rotary switch, as I'm a big fan of keeping it simple, but some of the automatic transfer switches aren't all that expensive and might be worth the hassle in the long run.
avarusbrightfyre 04/06/20 01:12pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

avarusbrightfyre, Magnum does not recommend running a roof air conditioner from their 3000 watt inverter/chargers. Going to 4000 watts means moving to a 24 or better yet a 48 volt battery bank. Then use a DC to dc converter to power the (low) 12 volt loads, or just use the OEM converter. Wouldn't increasing to 24 or 48 volts require more batteries to reach the same capacity? I believe I would need twice number the batteries at 24 volts to get the same number of amp hours as a 12 volt setup. I plan on mounting the inverter right next to the batteries and using big fat cables to minimize heat.
avarusbrightfyre 04/06/20 12:56pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

Hmm, I didn't see those reviews about fires, but now that I filtered for negative review, you are correct. I think I'll start browsing around for other options. I live in my travel trailer, so a fire would be catastrophic.
avarusbrightfyre 04/06/20 12:22pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

avarusbrightfyre, Magnum does not recommend running a roof air conditioner from their 3000 watt inverter/chargers. Going to 4000 watts means moving to a 24 or better yet a 48 volt battery bank. Then use a DC to dc converter to power the (low) 12 volt loads, or just use the OEM converter. I appreciate the information. At this time, it is not my intent to attempt running the air conditioner while on battery power. The inverter could technically do it, but I'd have to install crazy amounts of solar and battery capacity to make it viable. I'm mostly trying to oversize my system a bit to reduce wear and tear on the electrical and to ensure I can safely run everything at the same time without having to think about popping the breaker.
avarusbrightfyre 04/06/20 12:12pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

It's been my experience in a lot of things that a high price tag is not an indicator of quality. There are plenty of high priced items out there that aren't worth the cost to make them, and plenty of dirt cheap items that blow the competition out of the water. It just depends. Objecting to a product solely based on price is an unhelpful waste of time, especially if you are not going to recommend what you consider to be a better product.
avarusbrightfyre 04/05/20 11:13pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

My GoPower 2000 watt SW inverter will run anything in the trailer. Although not all at once. Sort of the reason I want a larger inverter. Don't want to have to worry about tripping the inverter by turning on too many things at once. I will obviously not want to leave things running because of battery capacity, but I don't want to have to think twice about using the microwave for a couple of minutes. Coupled with a decent solar setup, I hope to be able to live like I normally do on batteries except air conditioning. It would technically be able to run the air conditioner, but I'd have to have crazy amounts of solar to keep the batteries from dying very quickly. Probably doable on my trailer, but I don't know that I want to spend that much.
avarusbrightfyre 04/04/20 12:46pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

I have that one and have been using for 2 years. Works just fine and powers everything in the coach exept A/C. Draws a LOT of DC current for a short time to make coffee or run microwave. Runs her hair dryer just fine. Cost is reasonable. Housted Good to hear another good review on the product. I don't want to buy a bad product, but I also don't want to break the bank if I can avoid it.
avarusbrightfyre 04/04/20 11:48am Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

AFAIK the usual 3000w inverter will have 15a AC worth in two receptacles, which you can do with a 2000w inverter. To get more from the 3000w , you need to plug something separately into another of its (three is common, can have four) receptacles. I am unclear on the concept, so asking what happens with the 3000w that has hard wire output to your RV's 120v panel? How do you get all 3000w? Is the hard wire 30a to connect to your 30a or 50a RV? Meanwhile on what is a good 3000w inverter for a decent price, this one is (at least the 2000w is), but is not for hard wiring. I have the 2000w version and so does at least one other member here, and we are happy after two years so far doing whole house. No need for a 3000w. https://powermaxconverters.com/product-category/inverters-dc-ac/ The outlets on an inverter are rated for the same as a standard household outlet, from what I understand. That's fine for the most part, but for convenience, I want to be able to just run everything like normal in my RV, except the air conditioner. That means having to hard wire it into the RV electrical. To do that, you either have to wire it directly to your breaker panel, or figure out a way to plug your shore power cable into the inverter, which involves installing a 30 or 50 amp receptacle that you wire to the high output terminal that some inverters come with. This allows you to use the full range of the inverter and also all of your AC outlets in the RV. I will be pairing it with lithium iron phosphate batteries that can safely handle high loads.
avarusbrightfyre 04/04/20 11:44am Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

Where did you find a 3000 watt PSW inverter for $300? I might be interested. I would only need the high wattage for a second or two at a time, when both my freezers come on simultaneously. Running wattage would be under 1000 and so a cheaply built 3000 watt inverter might be just what I need :-). I obviously can't personally recommend anything since I haven't bought anything yet, but the front runner I'm considering is this one: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0792LW2H7/?coliid=I1GS5XIVYAJH4Z&colid=2O5BCSUPZ2QWT&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it It has good reviews on Amazon, and there is a YouTube review that does a load test at 3000 watts continuous for a while.
avarusbrightfyre 04/04/20 10:13am Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

I've been struggling to find good information on inverters. Do you have any recommendations for quality pure sine wave inverters at that wattage? I'd need one with the hard wire terminal. I'm not really up on specific brands, sorry, beyond generally hearing good things about the major well-known brands such as Samlex, Xantrex, Go Power, etc. Partially because oversizing the system reduces wear and tear by not approaching the limits of the hardware. Partially because I want to have some room for upgrades later without having to buy a whole new inverter.
avarusbrightfyre 04/03/20 11:45pm Tech Issues
RE: 50 Amp Receptacle to Inverter

My standard recommendation for high-wattage inverters, if you do run microwaves and toasters and coffee makers regularly, is to get a 24v or higher model. Higher voltage in means smaller cables and less potential for heat buildup in the batteries and cable connectors. I admit I may be confused, but wouldn't that mean running a 24 volt battery bank? How would that work with the 12V system in the RV?
avarusbrightfyre 04/03/20 03:56pm Tech Issues
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