RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'burningman' found 247 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 13  
Prev  |  Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: How to destroy a truck camper in .5 seconds.

That’s a better way to unload than using Happijacs.
burningman 11/10/19 07:56am Truck Campers
RE: Pick up for TC

The first thing that truck needs is wider mirrors, you can’t see around a camper with the ones it has on it. 2nd Gen Dodge tow mirrors They’re later model flip out mirrors that bolt to that ‘99. You need them. You can get manual ones or electric and heated. If you add heated ones and it didn’t have them already, you’ll need the heater control panel that has the switch and circuitry. Available on eBay. If you add power adjustable mirrors and the truck didn’t have that already, you’ll need the switch for that, also available on eBay. It mounts in a hole on the driver for that will have a cap over it if not originally equipped. The wiring is usually already there in the truck. Everything just plugs right in.
burningman 11/09/19 12:25pm Truck Campers
RE: Pick up for TC

That truck has a Dana 70 rear axle. Dana rates it for 7500 pounds, even though Dodge put a lower number on it. It’s probably a great rig. Your camper weight expectations aren’t realistic. Listed “dry weights” are pure fantasy land. In general, that truck should be fine with any camper in the 8 to 10 foot range. FORGET buying any half ton. 2500s are way under-rated. The biggest weight issue with half ton trucks is the wimpy rear axle. The wheels ride on the axle shafts, with one small bearing at each end. 3/4 tons generally have “floating” axles with a hub on each end that rides on two large bearings. The axle shafts just supply the power.
burningman 11/09/19 12:17pm Truck Campers
RE: Pick up for TC

There’s no such thing as a single rear wheel ‘99 Dodge 3500. If it has a manual transmission, it has a Dana 80 rear axle rated at 11,000 pounds, so if it’s a single rear wheel (2500) it’s limited mostly by the tires. If it’s a dually (3500) stock size tires will handle 10,800 pounds on the rear. That’s plenty. If it’s a single rear wheel 2500 with an automatic trans, it has a Dana 70. Those have enough capacity for single rear wheels, but if it has a lot of miles on it, beware the Dana 70 is known to fail and need rebuilding a lot sooner than the 80. The single most important thing about a ‘99 Dodge with a Cummins diesel is what engine block casting number it has. Specifically, whether it’s a “53 block”. If it is, DON’T buy it unless you’re ok with replacing the motor. 53 block Cummins have a very common nasty habit of cracking and they aren’t repairable. They were cast too thin and crack at the right rear. Look under the truck at the engine block. On the driver side, toward the front, down low. If there’s a “53” cast into it in inch high numbers, run away. If it says 54, 55, or 56 it’s fine. If it has a long series of 1/4 inch high numbers and letters, it’s the least common and most desirable Mexican block. (The 50-series blocks were cast in Brazil.) Seriously, read up on how to identify a 53 block Cummins and DON’T buy one. I’ve had two of them crack in my own truck. If it’s an automatic, it really needs some expensive upgrades. Plan on a $4000–$5000 performance-built transmission. Trust me, it needs it. If it was a 5th wheel hauler it may already have that done, but it’s hard to verify unless it has paperwork. The Diesel engine (I’m assuming it has that) does not lower the payload as so many people and even the factories tell you. All the camper weight goes on the rear. A lighter engine (gas) up front does not help carry a heavier load, you can’t get the weight of the camper up front anyway. There’s a lot more to pickup trucks than the length of the bed. How big a camper you want to haul changes a lot about what truck you need for it.
burningman 11/07/19 04:28am Truck Campers
RE: Truck Camper Proctology

Great, another cool tool I didn’t know I needed. Stop telling me about those!!
burningman 11/02/19 10:53am Truck Campers
RE: 2WD or 4X4 for a truck camper

Frankly when somebody writes that 4x4 doesn't cost in thousands over the life of the truck, I think he must be idiot or liar. Anybody can come with different explanation? I probably can’t come up with an explanation you would understand... My experience owning many two and four wheel drive trucks doesn’t bear that out. I had a 2WD crewcab dually and parked on a steep hill with a camper and heavy trailer. Tried to back up, but couldn’t. The 4WD I replaced it with, same otherwise, did it easily because it had low range. I could rattle off other incidents half the day. Just recently I was coming up the trail out of my friend’s camping property on wet leaves and lost traction. Not goin’ nowhere, even with the camper weight and limited slip diff. A simple shift to 4WD and problem gone, truck not stuck. These examples are with the camper on. Even if it did cost thousands extra over the life of the truck - which it doesn’t - it would be worth it. And I’d get it all back in resale value.
burningman 11/02/19 05:14am Truck Campers
RE: Overloaded wheel Breakage

FYI/question - on a 1-ton, the tire, wheel, axle, spring and frame ratings tend to be max'ed out equally, so upgrading just one component doesn't necessarily buy you much. I read what seemed like a fairly competent posting elsewhere that the lug bolts (pattern, count, size) are another weight-rated link-in-the-chain to consider. While the tires always win the weakest-link award, I wonder where lug bolts fall in the line-up? Axles are in fact very under-rated by the truck makers. If you check with the axle makers, you’ll find that 3/4 and 1-ton rear axles are rated a whole lot higher than the truck makers claim. Upgrading wheels and tires gets you real benefits.
burningman 11/01/19 10:13pm Truck Campers
RE: 2WD or 4X4 for a truck camper

I guess if you can’t handle a four wheel drive because you’ll think you’re invincible and you’ll crash it, you shouldn’t buy one.
burningman 10/31/19 10:45am Truck Campers
RE: 2WD or 4X4 for a truck camper

The usually-exaggerated story about seeing 4WDs crashed in the ditch all the time is a poor driver issue, not a disadvantage to having 4WD. And it’s not even true in my experience, which includes having been a tow truck driver. I see a lot more 2WDs struggling in snow every winter. What is the advantage of not being able to drive the front wheels when you want to, besides being a little cheaper to buy the truck? None!
burningman 10/31/19 10:02am Truck Campers
RE: 2WD or 4X4 for a truck camper

4x4 isn’t even a correct term. That name came from WWII vehicles with a 4’x4’ cargo space. They happened to be four wheel drive but that’s not what “4x4” means. The best argument for 4WD I’ve witnessed was driving over the pass in the snow one day. A guy in a 2WD pickup suddenly spun out and hit the wall. It was because we were all on the throttle to climb uphill, but he broke traction and spun. Everyone else around was in 4WD and didn’t. While it’s a side benefit, the low-range gears in a 4WD transfer case are a big advantage in lots of situations. 4WD trucks have tons of advantages. 2WD trucks are a little cheaper. That’s basically it.
burningman 10/31/19 07:02am Truck Campers
RE: True Truck Payload

New trucks have way higher payload ratings. Yet all along, they’ve had the same parts. Look at a 20 year old Dodge 2500, manual trans. It’s got a Dana 80 rear axle, rated for 11,000 pounds by Dana. Same one the same era F450 had. The payload rating sticker said you could barely haul a load of wet leaves. Dodge didn’t even sell a single rear wheel badged as a “3500” then, because it was redundant when the 2500 was literally the same thing. It really comes down to wheels and tires. The hard parts in 2500-3500 trucks are all similar. They put stiffer springs in some. They put taller suspension on some. Ford puts a couple-inch taller block between the axle and springs, and slightly stiffer springs into its SRW F250 and calls it an F350. Oh, and a bigger number on the sticker. The all-mighty payload sticker... it’s a magic thing.
burningman 10/28/19 06:17am Truck Campers
RE: Now that is a big Truck Camper

I think the 20,000 pound payload might be a stretch. That truck is only legal for 32,000 total, it hasn’t got the axles and tires for more. This looks cool but it’s a terrible rig to drive. The ride in these cabovers is horrible! Off road you have to crawl or you’ll beat yourself and the camper to death. I’d sooner use an old Peterbilt 359 or 389, with a real engine and air ride suspension. At least they drive nice.
burningman 10/28/19 05:49am Truck Campers
RE: Seat belts in a camper?

I’d sell the whole setup and buy a Suburban and trailer. You haven’t got room for twins and teens in a truck camper even if you can cram everyone into the truck.
burningman 10/23/19 11:33pm Truck Campers
RE: Recommendations for quiet portable generator

https://i.imgur.com/40stqeXl.jpg Where in your camper does that 3500 Predator fit? 4000 Watts (more than a 3500 Predator) of Honda EU2000 fits right in my generator compartment. Oh, that’s right... the 3500 doesn’t fit. You have to mount those things on a front hitch rack. And get someone to help you lift it. That sounds great.
burningman 10/22/19 01:30pm Truck Campers
RE: Recommendations for quiet portable generator

All the other Honda would do is return to idle and not make electricity. You can’t even run it out of oil, it shuts down before that happens too. Thousands of other people run a pair of Hondas, they work great. As for what model is best, pick your preference. The EU3000 is a little bit quieter, but it’s big and heavy and there’s nowhere to carry it in a truck camper. You have to either use a front truck hitch rack or build some sort of mount on the back. If it weren’t for that, I’d have one myself. The pair of EU2000s fit easily and you only ever have to lift one 50-pound set at a time. That’s a huge selling point. And they actually make more power. They DON’T grenade themselves if one quits running for whatever reason while powering an AC. That’s just not how it is.
burningman 10/21/19 04:44pm Truck Campers
RE: Planing on getting an Arctic Fox TC

Most leaks aren’t in the main part of the material that covers the TC. Most leaks seem to be in marker lights followed by other holes made installing antennas, sky lights, etc. Those leaks seem to be the cause of the delamination. Water has to enter somewhere to penetrate the filon. The advantage of a Bigfoot/Northern Lite vs other types is fiberglass generally doesn’t delaminate. :D Although there was the guy who bought a new Northern Lite who posted here about a similar buckle in his new one. That being said, aluminum doesn’t delaminate, and Azdel doesn’t either. Filon processes not done right will definitely delaminate if done wrong and a leak happens. If you do have a leak in a Bigfoot/Northern Lite, good luck fixing it once the insulation collects water. Host has a vacuum process to build their walls. So far, my almost 14 year old TC outside is fine. (It was actually built in 2005. YMMV. As noted, if you want a slide, Northern Lite is off the table. There are some Bigfoots with a slide. Seams along every corner and edge can leak. Seams that don’t exist can’t. Slides are virtually guaranteed future leaks and trouble. That’s why the good rigs don’t have them.
burningman 10/21/19 04:34pm Truck Campers
RE: Recommendations for quiet portable generator

OK sorry but I have to call BS on that. Honda EUs do not “go up in smoke” when they overload. All they do is return to idle speed and shut down the electricity. You just stop it and restart it and it’s on again. That’s how they work. I’ve owned six of ‘em, over the last almost-20 years. I’d have fried all of them if that story was true.
burningman 10/21/19 10:27am Truck Campers
RE: Recommendations for quiet portable generator

I have two Honda EU2000s, and I often run both even though one will handle what I’m doing, just because two barely off idle sound nicer than one throttled up. It’s a whole lot easier to lift and carry a couple of 50 pound sets than one 140 pound EU3000. And together they make more power too. You also get the option of running just one when your load is very light. The EU3000 is a terrific unit, but it’s size and weight make it not perfectly suited to use with a truck camper.
burningman 10/20/19 10:17pm Truck Campers
RE: Planing on getting an Arctic Fox TC

I’ve never heard of anyone needing to caulk the top/bottom joint on a Bigfoot or Northern Lite especially within a year. And that joint overlaps, too. There are always hatches, windows and vents, but the fiberglass shells have a huge advantage with no roof-to-wall seams, no corner seams and no rubber roofs. These things are the most leak-resistant available.
burningman 10/20/19 09:58pm Truck Campers
RE: Planing on getting an Arctic Fox TC

Northern Lite is a great choice, mainly for durability. They aren’t “stick built”, they don’t have roof and wall seams to leak.
burningman 10/19/19 10:11pm Truck Campers
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 13  
Prev  |  Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.