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 > Your search for posts made by 'dturm' found 262 matches.

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RE: Dog urinating and defecating on your site while owners watch

While replies have been diverse and very entertaining, most have stayed pretty civil. Let's keep it that way.
dturm 07/29/15 07:16pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Microchips

But if you or your tech get a reading on a chip, do you generally stop there....or would you routinely check for another? Our tech didn't do a secondary scan when we had our cat's chip read. I agree you'd be more likely to stop, but standard procedure is to scan multiple time to confirm the number (at least twice). Hopefully both chips would be put in close proximity - they are supposed to all go in the same area.
dturm 07/29/15 07:14pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Microchips

Having multiple chips is not a problem as long as all are read. I had a client who was going to Greece and I had to place a second chip that was ISO compliant with the European Pet Passport. My understanding is that they have re-engineered the chips to make migration less of a problem that the first generation chips. I have scanned them almost near the elbow :B, talk about migration.
dturm 07/29/15 06:55pm RV Pet Stop
RE: The Importance of Pet Identification

My dogs are chipped only problem I do not remember through what company it has been 7 years. I will have to find their adoption (sshh don't tell them they are adopted) papers. They also have id tags on their collar. One tag tells what kind of camper for in a campground and my cell number. Next time you go in to your vet, have them scan them. Most readers now will read the number (it won't tell you what company) and the numbers are unique, you should be able to find the company through one of the lookup services.
dturm 07/29/15 04:29pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Microchips

AVMA Microchip Literature and Summary
dturm 07/29/15 02:18pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Microchips

Q: What are some of the problems associated with microchips? How common are they? A: The British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA) maintains a database of adverse reactions to microchips. Since the database was started in 1996, over 4 million animals have been microchipped and only 391 adverse reactions have been reported. Of these reactions, migration of the microchip from its original implantation site is the most common problem reported. Other problems, such as failure of the microchip, hair loss, infection, swelling, and tumor formation, were reported in much lower numbers. For a chart summarizing the BSAVA reports, read the AVMA's literature review on Microchipping of Animals. Q: I've heard lately that microchips cause cancer. Do they? A: There have been reports that mice and rats developed cancer associated with implanted microchips. However, the majority of these mice and rats were being used for cancer studies when the tumors were found, and the rat and mice strains used in the studies are known to be more likely to develop cancer. Tumors associated with microchips in two dogs and two cats have been reported, but in at least one dog and one cat the tumor could not be directly linked to the microchip itself (and may have been caused by something else). For more details on the studies, read the AVMA's literature review on Microchipping of Animals. Q: I don't want my pet to get cancer. Should I have my pet's microchip removed? A: We do not recommend that you have your pet's microchip removed, for two reasons. First, based on our review of the studies, the risk that your animal will develop cancer due to its microchip is very, very low, and is far outweighed by the improved likelihood that you will get your animal back if it becomes lost. Second, although implanting a microchip is a very simple and quick procedure, removing one is more involved and may require general anesthesia and surgery. Current thinking now is that any insult to tissue (injection, bite, repeated trauma, etc.) causes the release of substances that in some individuals (very, very small percentage) may set up the circumstances where specific types of tumors could develop. There seems to be a familial (genetic) tendency. This is thought to be the mechanism where vaccine induced sarcomas develop in some cats. There are ongoing investigations to try to pin down the exact mechanism, but the chances of developing cancer from an RFID chip are just about nil. Much greater chance of getting away, lost and no ID without the chip.
dturm 07/29/15 02:04pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Microchips

Actually there have been reports of injection-site carcinoma (Founded or not? Obviously you'd know more about that.) Just saying...that could be one reason someone would want to unchip a pet. But generally I agree with you that removal has more potential for harm than good. Thanks for bringing that up. Totally UNFOUNDED by multiple studies.
dturm 07/29/15 12:49pm RV Pet Stop
RE: The Importance of Pet Identification

AAHA has started a universal microchip lookup service Pet microchip lookup Another private company is attempting to unify databases Check the chip Not all companies have yearly fees. There are some that do a single lifetime registration, but do have charges for changes in address or ownership. Doug, DVM
dturm 07/29/15 12:37pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Microchips

JMHO. If the pet was mine I would have a vet remove the pound chip. We have a home again chip. The chip is only as good as how the pet was lost. Since people stealing pets could remove the chip. Our only hope is honest people find the pet.We bought a high quality tag with our phone # and home again phone # Seems like it would be easy to remove, but unless there was an overwhelming reason, I'd never agree to do it. Having to retrieve bullets (for forensic reasons) or finding an object in a body is NEVER as easy as the movies and old cowboy shows seem to portray. You end up causing harm, tissue trauma, possibly introduce infection and cause PAIN. Just not an ethical procedure for any vet to do. Doug, DVM
dturm 07/29/15 12:28pm RV Pet Stop
RE: A very old stray {The Old Fella Story}

Get a owl stick-on applicque. It might frighten away flying birds. The house I grew up in had a big picture window and open space to the back porch that had windows, then an open field in back of the house. We'd get birds (mostly quail) trying to fly through.
dturm 07/28/15 11:15am RV Pet Stop
RE: Teaching a dog to "talk"

Youtube video
dturm 07/22/15 06:33pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Dog breed descrimination - showing up late un-announced

Sarcasm
dturm 07/21/15 08:12pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Dog breed descrimination - showing up late un-announced

I've always suspected the people doing the check-ins, especially the state CGs, that when they offer your dog(s) a treat, its just an unofficial test of the dog's friendliness. ... Probably a better way to test a dog's tendencies than by breed assessment.
dturm 07/21/15 06:48pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Dog breed descrimination - showing up late un-announced

I think you missed the point. If the dog is a rescued mix, then ANY identification of its "breed" is a visual guess - whether done by a vet, rescuer, owner, or city official. It means absolutely nothing in regards to the dog being dangerous or not. It's amazing the breed identification we get when people first visit with a dog. Rescues and individuals often put breeds and mixes that defy my experiences with breeds. We will often label a mix breed as a labX or goldenX or terrierX when the X is a pit or doberman or shepherd. Taking a vets id is no more accurate that just allowing the public to fill in the blank. This is one reason why the breed restrictions/laws are a joke. A huge percentage of the named breeds are not included due to bad ID. A law or regulation where people can knowingly avoid it (by merely adopting a position - "my dog is a lab cross") makes no sense.
dturm 07/21/15 09:50am RV Pet Stop
RE: Foam Mattress Question.....

Is yours a short queen? What brand mattress? I don't seem to be able to find much in a conventional mattress. jeff It's a full queen, I don't remember the brand but we got it at one of the mattress stores (mattress warehouse I think). We were more concerned about height as the bedroom slide out has to fit under the wardrobe slide on the other side when closed. We just found one comfortable then measured height to make sure it fit.
dturm 07/20/15 05:05am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Foam Mattress Question.....

We replaced the sleep number bed with a conventional mattress (inner spring/foam top) and the gas struts on the lift worked fine. If yours is a similar set up you should be OK. The gas struts do come in different strengths and it's a pretty easy fix if yours doesn't have enough umph to lift it (I've had to replace a couple on outside basement doors). Doug
dturm 07/19/15 08:40pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Dog breed descrimination - showing up late un-announced

Breed bans are brought about because it is statistically proven that the risk of loss from those breeds are higher than the risks from others to the point that they are uninsurable. This is the problem and a reason breed bans don't really work. The statistics are NOT proven because the input data is seriously flawed. Breed identification in bite incidents is seriously inaccurate. To try to reach reliable conclusions with this information is pointless. Actually breed bans do exist because some clerk or bean counter is trying to develop any method possible to mitigate damages and payouts thus resulting in more profit. I'd really like to see if the breed bans do actually reduce the number of claims involving dog bites. Then you have all the mix breed dogs that are mostly ignored by the insurance industry. And you have all the individuals identified by their owners as XXX breed, not one of banned breeds. Is the insurance company or you as a business owner going to refuse service to those owners because you "know" this is one of the banned breeds? There are so many better ways to deal with dog aggression and dog bite prevention than to institute breed bans.
dturm 07/18/15 09:41am RV Pet Stop
RE: Dog breed descrimination - showing up late un-announced

While all that is true, there is no way for any business (including yours) to pre-determine whether or not a dog arriving is a stable, well trained dog, or a poorly socialized, untrained one. While you would rather deal with a well trained Doberman or Pit Bull, I would also like to point out you would much rather be attacked by a Lab or a Poodle than attacked by a Doberman or Pit Bull. The damage that can be inflicted by the breeds most often targeted for breed exclusions is much more serious than can be inflicted by the vast majority of dogs. The first statement is true, the second is poppycock. While I can't pre-determine a dog's reaction to a certain situation, I (as most vets) have developed a pretty good ability to read the situations pretty quickly. I wouldn't have lasted 37 years with my body relatively intact without that ability. While I've had more training and experience than most, there is a minimal skill level that needs to be taught early to everybody This would help avoid situations where bites happen. A lab, golden, poodle or any breed can inflict damage as severe as any of the named breeds. Terriers tend to shake after biting which causes so much tissue trauma. While size of the dog biting CAN make a difference, it's just a fallacy that bites from dogs not on the list are less serious. I understand that there are lots of people that aren't dog people and running a business to try to satisfy everybody is tough, but to think that dog related problems will be eliminated or even reduced by breed restrictions just doesn't seem valid. If that's what the insurance people demand, you just don't have much choice.
dturm 07/17/15 05:16pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Niagra Falls to Sault Ste Marie Ontario

Moved to road & routes.
dturm 07/17/15 05:00pm Roads and Routes
RE: 10 Most Dangerous Breeds of Dogs

There are glaring flaws in these breed statistics, they do not take into account the population of each breed. In many human statistics the data are equated on a per capita basis. This is not done with breed statistics because breed populations are not determined. Additionally, there is no good way to deal with mixed breed dogs. I'll bet you'll find the bite and fatality statistics indicate that the most dangerous breed of dog is "mixed breed" since it is the most populous "breed" of dog. Those compiling the data often add bite data of mixed breeds dogs to the breed they most resemble. Glaring problems with dog bite statistics exist to the point that they are just about useless when trying to really evaluate the problem of dog bites. First, a huge percentage of bites are never reported. If the dog in your family bites but doesn't severely injure, it's not reported but is an important statistical event when trying to solve the dog bite problem. Second, the dog breed involved in the reported events are notoriously mis-identified. After all, we all know that the dog that bites must be one of those breeds on the list. Mark's point about mix breed dogs being the most dangerous statistically is REALLY valid. So often the events surrounding a bite center on the dog while there are several other factors, probably most notable the lack of proper control, supervision and training by the owner of the dog involved. Doug, DVM
dturm 07/17/15 04:52pm RV Pet Stop
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