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 > Your search for posts made by 'jshupe' found 157 matches.

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RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

With 4500 pound trailer no extra engine braking is needed. Even at the full tow rating no additional engine braking is needed. This would be what the truck is rated for. https://fifthwheelst.com/SAE-J2807-Tow-Tests.html The standardized tow rating tests don't involve anything with downhill braking, where your brakes might fade from overuse and cease to be effective. All they require is that the combination be able to stop in <80ft from 20mph without leaving the lane. Stating that equates to driving in the mountains is disingenuous at best. Even with J2807, tow ratings are ambiguous and often unequivocal to real-world performance.
jshupe 04/26/21 10:34am Towing
RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

You're not going to downshift and cruise on down the hill with your feet flat on the floor towing a trailer. Most vehicles won't even do that empty. I do exactly that - I usually let the EB do all the work and don't even have to touch the brakes except to slow for curves. All your statement does is show that you've never driven anything with an effective EB. Nothing more. Regarding Op's question, that engine will be far less effective than the 8.1L in your sig. And the 8.1 in your sig will be far less effective than a modern Cummins, Duramax, or Scorpion. This has nothing to do with the subject at hand here. Last I checked you could not get a diesel with an engine brake in a 2021 Ford Ranger, so the discussion is limited to gasoline engines. The OP is trying to tow something like a 4500lb trailer. He does not need a big dually diesel. At what point did I say he needs a diesel? I suggested a larger displacement engine that can offer more engine/transmission braking performance, since engine braking is proportional to displacement (and compression).
jshupe 04/26/21 10:10am Towing
RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

You're not going to downshift and cruise on down the hill with your feet flat on the floor towing a trailer. Most vehicles won't even do that empty. I do exactly that - I usually let the EB do all the work and don't even have to touch the brakes except to slow for curves. All your statement does is show that you've never driven anything with an effective EB. Nothing more. Regarding Op's question, that engine will be far less effective than the 8.1L in your sig. And the 8.1 in your sig will be far less effective than a modern Cummins, Duramax, or Scorpion.
jshupe 04/22/21 08:09am Towing
RE: Are lithium batteries worth the cost?

Substantially increased usable energy in the same footprint, a fraction of the weight, and many times the cycle life. Whether or not it is worth the investment depends on your individual usage. If you're boondocking extensively, they're absolutely worth it. I believe that people who advocate against LiFePO4 specifically, are those who have never used them or who don't have a camping style appreciable to them. As noted elsewhere in this thread, charging them below freezing can be an issue. The battery bay on your AF1150 will not provide a lot of insulation, so you would want to invest in batteries that have built in heaters. It easily mitigates the issue. Also, as you scale up bank size, Lithium becomes the only way to go due to space/weight -- but it doesn't sound like you're considering more than the two drop-ins at the moment.
jshupe 04/21/21 05:37pm Truck Campers
RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

What is all this malarkey about "engine braking?" I've owned several full size pickup trucks, all with small block V8's except my '03 Chevy 3500, and NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THEM could hold ITSELF back on any sort of incline using the engine alone. Downshift downshift downshift, rev rev rev, faster faster faster... I ALWAYS had to control the descent with brakes. The ONLY truck I've ever owned that would control itself on a hill is the '03 Chevy 3500 with the 8.1L and Allison. Turn on tow haul mode, hold the brakes for 3 seconds, and the hill would have to be EXTREMELY steep to need brakes, and then only a brief tap. However, the truck still needs frequent application of brakes to maintain speed with any sort of trailer behind. Unless you're throwing out a ship's anchor at the top of the hill, you're using brakes. That's my experience with gas engines, not diesels with exhaust brakes. My current truck does a great job managing 25K+ GCW on 6-7% grades without having to use the brakes. The EB in my Duramax was considerably weaker, but still much better than any gas engine I've used.
jshupe 04/21/21 11:40am Towing
RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

I think other people have answered this appropriately, so I'll just add an example: Just yesterday we drove eastbound over Monarch Pass in Colorado. The east side is 10 miles of 6-7% grade -- if you try going down that using nothing but your service brakes, you're going to end up on the runaway truck ramp halfway down. Driving in the mountains, the irresponsible thing is using your service brakes to maintain a fixed speed on the downhills rather than engine/transmission braking. Brakes fade under continued use and if you ride them to control your speed, they won't be effective when you actually need them to suddenly slow (like to make it around a curve) or stop the vehicle. Oh, and the drum brakes that come on most trailers are much worse about fading than disc brakes - on my fifth wheel, I converted over to disc many years ago, and suggest you do the same if you think you're going to be using the trailer brakes on any long grades. Most trailers come with barely sufficient brakes for the hill country.
jshupe 04/21/21 08:22am Towing
RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

When I said screaming, I was referring to my experience with engine/transmission braking on downhill grades with a... 2014 3.5 Ecoboost. The engine had more than enough power to make it up (without screaming), but struggled to keep speeds under control coming down without the brakes. No trailer brakes ? Downshift early on long downhills ! Of course I had trailer brakes - I prefer not to use them to maintain a fixed speed on long downhill grades. I reserve them for tight turns, traffic, and stopping. I always downshifted on long downhills. Doing so increases RPM, resulting in the screaming I mentioned. Gas engine braking is proportional to displacement. Smaller engines have less of it and I doubt this engine would have enough to handle the trailer in question alone on a 6% grade without riding the brakes. Modern 3/4T+ diesels have exhaust or engine brakes from the factory, which are extremely effective. Not sure about the smaller diesels.
jshupe 04/21/21 12:45am Towing
RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

thanks for the response, think i will forget about my plans for the ford ranger. think I need something more heavy duty.You have more power and less weight than me and I been over plenty of hills. Hitch up and go have some fun. No diesel needed by a long shot with 4500 pounds. Don't worry these turbo charged engines run at much lower RPM that what in implied with people using the work "screaming". Most likely you glide effortlessly over the hills without issue. When I said screaming, I was referring to my experience with engine/transmission braking on downhill grades with a... 2014 3.5 Ecoboost. The engine had more than enough power to make it up (without screaming), but struggled to keep speeds under control coming down without the brakes.
jshupe 04/20/21 07:33pm Towing
RE: can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

Going up, you'll work the engine and spend the entire climb in boost. I doubt power will be an issue, but wear might be in the distant future if you tow often enough. Going down I expect you'll be working the brakes because I don't imagine that engine/trans will offer enough hold back for the truck and 4500lb trailer to be of much use. Sounds like you might be setting yourself up for some white knuckle descents, but I've never tried that combination and I doubt many others here have. I know my old Ecoboost 3.5 struggled to hold speed coming down 7-8% grades with a ~6K trailer, or at least scream doing it and still required some assistance. Your smaller engine will be notably less effective.
jshupe 04/20/21 04:24pm Towing
RE: 19.5" Tire Comparisons

Wheels, specifically the steel inners I believe. I was more interested in hearing the timeline than the parts.
jshupe 04/19/21 11:56am Truck Campers
RE: 19.5" Tire Comparisons

I ended up cancelling the order because the original lead time was 2-3 weeks and they just doubled that to 4-6 weeks -- off to find another vendor, or back to the drawing board.
jshupe 04/19/21 10:51am Truck Campers
RE: Solar Panel Height

Mine are as close as possible given a curved roof. If I redo the system in summer of 2022, I'll have a rack that is above the air conditioner. Now that would be something to see going down the road. Rack is the way to go. It avoids shading and gives you maximum use of space.
jshupe 04/19/21 10:24am Tech Issues
RE: 19.5" Tire Comparisons

Wow. That is quiet the rear tread. Thought the first pic was the drive until I scrolled down. Interested to here your experience on the noise from them. Yeah, I was going to run them all around but was worried about them on the steer axle - talked to a tire shop that deals with these, and this was his recommendation based on experience. Makes sense to me. As I think I mentioned elsewhere in this thread, I used Michelin XDS2 tires on my last truck, and these Hybrid HD3 tires look to be very similar.
jshupe 04/18/21 04:24pm Truck Campers
RE: 19.5" Tire Comparisons

Ended up 245/70r19.5 tires and wheels today. Chose Continental Hybrid HD3 steers and Continental Terra HD3 drives. If anyone is interested in the combination, I can post feedback/reviews later. The steers are a fairly conventional 19.5" drive tire like most people who go 19.5s end up with -- I believe they may be the OE AT option on F-450s? https://blobs.continental-tires.com/www8/servlet/image/191418/uncropped/0/560/6/hybrid-hd3-19-5.png width=500 The drives are definitely more aggressive - but potentially too aggressive for the front, and no siping. https://blobs.continental-tires.com/www8/servlet/image/192578/product_detail_xl/570/880/4/cthd3-tire-image1.png?fbclid=IwAR2nDPfl4NM4cN2BxDCv10FWzsy5vbDDbzKfsnTCZaK-B4v6or2QYycOIT8 width=500
jshupe 04/18/21 11:57am Truck Campers
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

The title of this thread is "OPERATIONAL PROBLEMS WITH NEW DIESEL PICKUPS". I literally listed all the operational problems with 2011-onwards diesel pickups ("new"). I explained the cost of ownership of a "new" diesel pickup vs gasser and how many miles/years it would take to make up the $10K premium of a diesel engine vs a gasser engine. I explained that the new 2020+ gas engines are potent tow-ers with plenty of HP and torque, that can easily satisfy the towing needs of the general - occasional - towing public that tows weights below, let's say 16-18,000 lbs. I also explained that the new gas engines are also much cheaper to operate and maintain and do not suffer from all the drama associated with the new diesels. IMHO the diesel truck manufacturers have been focusing on the wrong objectives - competing on extra lbs of towing capacity and higher torque. Instead, they should be competing on reliability and quality. But those things are not easy to measure. You can't say "New Duramax is 17.3% more reliable". What is much easier to say is "New Duramax has leading torque in its class, exceeding the competition by 17 ft/lbs of torque and 12 HP". In essence, they are competing on "whose is bigger" and the unwashed masses that are conditioned to lap this up - are lapping it up. As for your claim that I am overstating the CP4 problems - there are literally millions and millions of trucks out there with a ticking time bomb (the CP4 pump) - all powerstrokes from 2011-2021, Duramaxes from 2011-2016 and Cummins from 2014 and onwards. That's a lot of potentially expensive repairs for a hell of a lot of people. Ford is embroiled in a class action lawsuit, so is GM. RAM is probably next. You telling me that my beef is with a pump, not a fuel system is silly. Diesels can be great but they are NOT great in millions and millions of vehicles sold in the last 10+ years. What about emissions systems? Plenty of expensive repairs in that arena as well. Why do you think half of these trucks are deleted, despite the fact that it is illegal to do so? My experience owning diesels has been relatively problem free. So have the ownership experiences of most people I know -- I know of several owners, but not of any other HPFP failures. You keep talking about a fuel pump, but it's both easy to mitigate and easy to avoid. It accounts for a very small amount of actual, real-world issues, it just happens to be a rather loud one that gets lots of attention due to the repair bills. For what it's worth, the 2014-2018 Cummins still used the CP3, they only used CP4 for 2019-2020. I've put 70K+ on CP4s and while I did lose one, it was the exception and not the rule (on a '10, nonetheless). Many people have gone hundreds of thousands of miles on them. They don't all have issues and while dealerships may repair a few a year, the overwhleing majority of trucks with CP4 pumps do not end up in the shop for them. Again, other than on Ford, they're easy to swap out and avoid if they keep you up at night. You've bought into the "squeaky wheel" arguments and now think every CP4 is a ticking time bomb and that all the emissions systems are going to fail. The people with issues complain loudly - the people without generally don't have as much to say. And very importantly, information and reputations take years to turn around, so you're missing the point that substantial improvements have been made in the last decade. As you were so quick to remind me, we're discussing the "OPERATIONAL PROBLEMS WITH NEW DIESEL PICKUPS". I could equally say that you are understating the problems. I could say that your whole premise has been "I am rich and buy what I want and I want a diesel and if you can't afford it, buy a gasser"? Although you also said "buy the right tool for the job". So, one of us must be confused ;) For most of the fools out there towing, say, 8-15,000 lbs once or twice a month to the local campgrounds within a 500 mile radius and whose trucks otherwise do not work for a living hauling equipment around construction sites etc. - please explain to me why the diesel is the right tool for the job (righter) than the new 2020+ gasser like the 7.3L Ford or the 6.6L Chevy. Esp. at the $10K premium right off the bat and the much higher maintenance/operational cost down the road. Not rich - I have to prioritize my spending and budget just like most other people. This forum is largely dedicated to a leisure activity, so most people here have already made the decision to spend lots of money on things that aren't necessary. You're getting all caught up on a $10K difference in vehicles that cost $60K+ already. The higher the trim, the more marginal the cost is relative to the purchase price. Vehicles are pay to play - I don't think diesel mainteinance costs are that high or out of hand. I do think they make the experience much better, starting at 7K, and much safer starting at 14K or 10K if you spend a lot of time in the mountains. Those are all loose numbers, but I firmly disagree with your 16-18000lb figures. Most 40' fifth wheels - extremely common now - are much better behind a diesel. My parameters for when a diesel makes sense do not align with yours, which appears to be confusing for you. As you pointed out, the title of this thread is "OPERATIONAL PROBLEMS WITH NEW DIESEL PICKUPS". The post asks about operational problems - which are greatly exaggerated and you are continuing to push tropes that are more valid about trucks made ten years ago than they are today. The incremental changes they've made each year have greatly improved the situation. It did not ask about money in the original post. It asked about diesels, for "Towing a 14,000 lb. fiver into the Rockies". As far as I'm concerned, that's fully diesel territory, especially if that's a dry weight. These are bogus claims, of course. Diesel engine have higher torques so they have strenghtened parts - well, you are explaining why - to deal with higher torques and the heavier weight of the engine. I have never heard of a higher axle or frame or transfer case or anything else failure rate in gassers than in diesel, don't be silly :) So first, you ask me to point out what trucks come with stronger components with diesel than gas, then essentially retort "of course they do". For lots of people, especially people towing or hauling heavy to boondocking sites, the increased TC and axle strentgh could be important. The difference in shaft diameter or wall thickness could be the difference between a trail rescue or driving out. The axle on my 6.7HO is monstrous compared to the gas rear end and as a side effect, I am a lot more confident about its strength when asked to crawl over things with a 5K+ camper on it. I ask a lot from my vehicles and am always breaking things - but I'm breaking far less on my diesels.
jshupe 04/17/21 08:21am Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

Point to an example of a 3/4 ton or 1-ton SRW where the tranny or the axle or whatever is "heavier duty" in a diesel than in an equivalent gasser. https://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/27474085/
jshupe 04/16/21 09:07pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

People are having the same issues with the new Cummins trucks. In fact, RAM switched back to a CP3 pump. Duramaxes are having the same issues as well. You edited the post after my intial reply and made this about a fuel pump. Yeah, so that leaves only Ford shipping CP4s -- which have received incremental year to year improvements, by the way. The majority of your whole argument against diesels is the fuel pump, which falls apart here. Duramax moved away from CP4 in 17, I think. I think you are proving yourself what I am saying. You just spent $80K buying a "German" only to spend more thousands on crippling it back to a lesser fuel pump, to protect it from an expensive failure. How about the emissions systems failures? Plenty of those as well You grossly overexaggerate the issues. For the next couple replies, you can have your straws now. However did we tow things back when the "legendary" and "indestructible" diesels didn't have exhaust brakes? ;) Dangerously, at times. Or Pacbrake. Point to an example of a 3/4 ton or 1-ton SRW where the tranny or the axle or whatever is "heavier duty" in a diesel than in an equivalent gasser. On Ram, there are three different transmissions, three different transfer cases, and two different rear axles in use for 2019+MY. Don't know about Ford. Generally, diesel parts across the board are strengthened to deal with the additional torque.
jshupe 04/16/21 08:59pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

Hmmm. An F-250 gasser and F-350 gasser (in the SRW version) will almost always be rated for more payload because the gas engine is lighter than the diesel so at least in "legal" ratings with in a particular GVWR it will have more payload. The 7.3L Godzilla gasser Ford comes with the same 10-sp tranny as the equivalent Powerstroke. As far as I am aware, the same axles etc, are in the gassers and diesels up to and including the 1 ton trucks. A lot of the time they get artificially de-rated (on paper) to fit a lesser class of truck. It would not make any sense for the manufacturer to use different axles on an equivalent F-250 or F-350 gasser/diesel trucks. In fact, the "new" 10-sp tranny used by 2020/2021 Ford gasser/diesel offerings is built by GM and there is a rumor of a 10sp 6.6L Chevy gasser for 2022.... You keep using Ford as an example. I'll take your word on Ford. On Ram, there are three different transmissions, three different transfer cases, and two different rear axles in use for 2019+MY. It looks like you edited more of your post too, but I'm not going to take the time to go back and edit all my replies. In summary, it sounds like you had a poor experience with a Powerstroke 6.7 that you bought, and swore off all diesel engines after that.
jshupe 04/16/21 08:42pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

Spend some time on the Powerstroke 6.7L facebook group or on any powerstroke online forums. I'm not gullible enough to buy a Powerstroke. Sure, if you have money coming out of your ears, it is never about cost ; I'm you even you buy more than you need at times. As I see it, choosing a diesel pickup over a gasoline pickup is comparable to buying a luxury sedan over an economy one. So you did have a CP4 failure? ;) What was the bill? $10K? $12K Around $10K, but who buys a BMW or any german car without expecting repairs? You can swap both Duramax and Cummins to CP3 if the CP4 keeps you up at night. An argument against a particular fuel pump is not a valid argument against a fuel. Lucky you warranty covered it. Ford is not covering them, that's why there is a class action lawsuit. One of the multiple reasons I would not buy another Ford. An argument against a particular brand is not a valid argument against a fuel. Why? If diesels are so reliable..... An argument against a particular fuel pump is not a valid argument against a fuel. I was talking about money - what modern diesels cost to maintain/operate and the issues they are seeing. And I'm noting that you're exaggerating the issues and blind to how people prioritize spending. People buy what they are programmed to buy or what others tell them to buy. "Hey guys, I bought a 10K lbs travel trailer, what truck do I get???". "Buy a diesel! They last forever and they have awesome power!". Buy the right tool for the job. I'm not telling anyone what to buy. I'm saying that the issues with diesel engines are not as common as you portray, and that you fail to acknowledge that some things are bought because they're wanted, not needed. I agree, easier to tow with an exhaust brake but gassers have natural engine retardation so that counts for something at least. They do, but it's not anywhere close. And every one I've towed with has had to scream to utilize it with anything marginally steep or heavy. Hmmm. An F-250 gasser and F-350 gasser (in the SRW version) will almost always be rated for more payload because the gas engine is lighter than the diesel so at least in "legal" ratings with in a particular GVWR it will have more payload. There is a whole lot more to this than payload/GVWR even if you aren't discussing being overweight. Longevity will vary between parts, with the heavier parts usually lasting longer under similar loading. And for those of us who spend a lot of time off-road, the transfer cases and axles are often of great value. I don't want to snap a shaft with a heavy camper while crawling off a small shelf.
jshupe 04/16/21 08:38pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Eagle Cap quality control continues to disappoint

Wow, ridiculous.
jshupe 04/16/21 07:17pm Truck Campers
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