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 > Your search for posts made by 'ktmrfs' found 488 matches.

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RE: Glow plug still in warranty

LML duramax is one up on the cummins. It has glow plugs AND a grid heater. I suspect the grid heater doesn't have near as much heat output as the cummins grid heater. Course some of the cummins in Motor homes have neither grid heaters or glow plugs, but do have a ether(sp?) AKA starting fluid injection bottle!
ktmrfs 11/13/19 09:04pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Microwaves on inverters.

I have a unit with 1500 watt microwave and would like to be able to use it occasionally when dry camping (10 min or less at a time). I plan to use a 2000 watt pure sine wave inverter. Also plan using it on a 900 watt coffee maker (about 15 min a pot). Anyone have any experience with this setup? Thanks, Doug run our microwave quite often on an inverter. you will need enough battery and big short cables from battery to inverter. Now one thing to consider, which we did was to toss the original microwave in the donate pile and buy a panasonic true inverter microwave. It's operation is much different than traditional microwaves. when in partial power mode it doesn't cycle between 0% and 100%, it actually runs at the % set. So.... if you set it to 50% that's what it runs at continually. Ours is a 1500watt microwave and I run it easily on a 1000W inverter if power is set to 50% or less. At 50% power it does NOT take twice as long to heat something, more like 25% longer. I also have a hotel type keurig that draws 900W and we run it off the 1000W inverter with no problems either. for this type of draw I'd recomend either 4 GC2s or a bank of 12V. GC2's aren't great for large current draw and have high internal resistance compared to a 12V jar. So with only 2 GC2's your inverter may shut down when batteries are below 75%ish SOC. With 4 GC2's it should work down to 50%. I run 4GC2's, with only 2 it only worked with batteries charged above 75% or so. A few others have had similar experiences.
ktmrfs 11/12/19 11:58am Tech Issues
RE: Brake fluid change?

brake Fluid change seems to vary signficantly by mfg. Currently two of my cars state "every two years", while my truck is 10 years or 100K miles. Past vehicles have varied from every year on up. Every vehicle I have owned did have a recomended brake fluid change interval either by years or miles or both.
ktmrfs 11/11/19 12:34pm Tech Issues
RE: Is a fuse a fuse?

Not sure I understand why one would fuse a solar panel. What rating fuse would you use? ...the solar panel is simply incapable of sourcing higher current than its maximum output.....a fuse could never blow. The other end is not a current source assuming it is a charge controller, so nothing that could provide current to blow a fuse there, either..... am I missing something? single panel I agree. Multiple panels another story. Let's assume you have 6 panels in parallel. One panel develops an internal short positive to negative, each panel can supply 15A, Now all the sudden you have 5 panels suppling up to a total of 60A through the wiring on the shorted panel. not a good idea. The fuse serves as a isolation device. Fusing requirements for solar panels are more focused on house grid tie applications where you could have a dozen or more panels in parallel.
ktmrfs 11/10/19 09:59am Tech Issues
RE: Is a fuse a fuse?

IIRC, automotive fuses rating are based on a maximum of 32VDC-36VDC. Voltages above that may cause the fuse to blow (48VDC) the fuse to blow "early". ktrmrfs is spot on with his statements. What people need to understand that the "variability" of a fuse. A 15A fuse will "carry" 16A of current for hours and not blow. It might even carry 20A for several seconds. Back to the OP original concern. ATO/ATC sized inline fuses older with either 10AWG or 12AWG are readily available online. Although you can get these fuses up to 40A, If I needed a fuse larger than 30A I think i would use a Maxi-fuse. These typically come with 8AWG wire. voltage above the fuse rated voltage will NOT cause it to blow provided current is at or below the fuse rated current . But voltages above the rated voltage may cause the fuse to continue to arc when it does blow. Just like massive current can cause the arc to continue even below the rated voltage. That's why fuses have max voltage rating and max current interupt ratings.
ktmrfs 11/10/19 09:52am Tech Issues
RE: Brake fluid change?

I don't know how many on here remember honing the wheel cylinders for drum brakes back in the 60's with a honing tool inserted into an electric drill. When you removed the rubber ends and run your fingernail inside the cylinder you could feel where the ID of the steel had been etched away from the moisture. The depth of etched valleys were deep enough to cause the rubber seal to leak brake fluid all over the brakes, which to me is serious for a 20-30k lb MH coming down a steep hill. I don't change mine every 2 years, I have a Chevy chassis but have changed it probably 3-4 times over the last 15 years. What I do is jack up the front end and gravity drain the fluid starting in the rear the working my way to the front. I suck out the old fluid from the MC first with a turkey baster and add new fluid so only the lines have old fluid. When the fluid comes out clean I close the bleeder and open the next one. I can do this job myself and it does not take as long as it sounds. never honed a brake cylinder on drum brakes but did need to replace a few even though I flushed the brakes every year or so. Today, gone are drum brakes, gone are the days when car brakes could do ONE panic stop from about 60mph before fade set in. So... now brakes have more reserve, doesn't mean moisture doesn't affect them, just means it doesn't show up as quick but the failure is the same when it happens from water in the fluid. Water molecules are very small, you can make things "air tight" so that Nitrogen or Oxygen molecules won't go through but that doesn't mean they are "water tight" H2O molecules are much smaller. Water vapor can migrate through many plastics and rubber hoses and contaminate the brake fluid.
ktmrfs 11/09/19 09:51pm Tech Issues
RE: Is a fuse a fuse?

fuses are rated for interupt current, interupt time, and arc interuption voltage. that is how much current before it trips, how long an overcurrent takes before it blows, and how high the voltage can be and still interupt the current and not sustain an arc thus not interupting the current flow. AFAIK for solar panels, since most are used in houses and many are interconnected to the house power feed and power line there are spec's for the fuses to be used. Now, when used with a trailer, likely another story. no line connection, no feed to the power grid. Now I am by no means an expert on this application, but if it was me using a 15A auto blade type fuse and fuseholder I would feel comfortable. BTW 14Ga wire is rated for 15A, 10Ga wire is rated for 30A in romex, higher in individual strands. The 10Ga gives lower voltage drop.
ktmrfs 11/09/19 09:45pm Tech Issues
RE: Filling Propane While Traveling

My tanks are 30 pounds and weigh 55 pounds when full. All of the exchange places in my area ONLY swap the 20 pound tanks. Hence the question. many gas stations, uhaul locations, etc. will fill propane tanks, including the 30lb tanks. And IMHO swapping tanks is a boondoggle. First the cost/gallon of propane is much higher than filling, second most if not all only give you a partially filled tank I only use tank swaps when my tanks are expired, cheaper than getting them recertified. yup I've used the "tank swap" option with an expired tank as well. In fact the pump jockey at the location helped me look through the tanks to find one in good shape and nearly new.
ktmrfs 11/08/19 08:36pm Travel Trailers
RE: Filling Propane While Traveling

My tanks are 30 pounds and weigh 55 pounds when full. All of the exchange places in my area ONLY swap the 20 pound tanks. Hence the question. many gas stations, uhaul locations, etc. will fill propane tanks, including the 30lb tanks. And IMHO swapping tanks is a boondoggle. First the cost/gallon of propane is much higher than filling, second most if not all only give you a partially filled tank
ktmrfs 11/08/19 10:49am Travel Trailers
RE: Replacing 12-volt batteries with 6-volt

It is not the capacity so much as the voltage drop. The more cells the lower the voltage drop. and the thinner the plates and larger number of plates reduces voltage drop as well. But gives up cycle life and DOD capability. No free lunch.
ktmrfs 11/05/19 03:52pm Tech Issues
RE: Replacing 12-volt batteries with 6-volt

6V advantage 1) can take 500+ charge discharge cycles to under 50% (more like 25%) SOC Disadvantage: do NOT work well with high current loads, like even 1000W inverter. First ALL the current is coming from each battery vs 1/2 the current from each battery in a similar parallel 12V, Next, they have much higher internal resistance than a 12V which means more voltage drop 6V vs 12V IMHO really depends on YOUR application. If you only occasionally dry camp, or often use high inverter loads, then 12V may be a better alternative. . Note that I have for a out 6 years routinely run my Coleman Mach 1 P.S. 11kbtu air conditioner for brief periods (up to an hour or more concurrent with 440w solar) from two 6v GC’s without a hitch (via ProSine 2.0 - 04 aught cables), with locked rotor starting amps at about 140amps - now running Costco GC’s...Cables do MATTER... On 2 GC with short 4/0 welding cable I was able to run a 1KW load or so with my setup as well. However, usually only worked if the SOC of the batteries was in the 75% + or so or the inverter would kick out on startup. Now I have 4 GC and don't have a problem untill less than 50% SOC. Now low voltage cutout likely varies by inverter so what works for one may not work for another. And the solar input helps as well. In any event the internal resistance of GC is higher than 12V and for the same AH you have 1/2 the load sharing with GC compared to 12v.
ktmrfs 11/05/19 09:23am Tech Issues
RE: Install cassette toilet, use black tank for grey water??

no need to add a cassette toilet to do this. If your tanks have a common outlet (very common), get a twist on gate valve. Then do the following When the grey tank is full: 1) attach the gate valve to the dump valve, CLOSE THE GATE VALVE. 2) Open the grey tank valve, then open the black tank valve. This will backflush grey water to the black tank and equalize the volumes. 3) once the tanks equalize, CLOSE both the grey and black tank valves. you can continue to do this till both tanks are full. 4) when ready to leave, make sure both the grey and black tank valves are closed and using a small bucket at the twist on valve, open this valve to flush the gallon or so of water in the dump line and dispose of it. 5) remove the twist on gate valve. I've done this for years. And actually I also do this when I dump easy way to backflush the black tank at a dump station.
ktmrfs 11/05/19 09:17am Tech Issues
RE: Replacing 12-volt batteries with 6-volt

6V advantage 1) can take 500+ charge discharge cycles to under 50% (more like 25%) SOC Disadvantage: do NOT work well with high current loads, like even 1000W inverter. First ALL the current is coming from each battery vs 1/2 the current from each battery in a similar parallel 12V, Next, they have much higher internal resistance than a 12V which means more voltage drop 6V vs 12V IMHO really depends on YOUR application. If you only occasionally dry camp, or often use high inverter loads, then 12V may be a better alternative. If you often dry camp, can keep your load down to 50A or less peak, 6V may be a better choice.
ktmrfs 11/04/19 10:23am Tech Issues
RE: Changes in Air Temp and Tire PSI

Pure nitrogen has ZERO advantage in car/truck/trailer tires. Negligible yes, Zero, not quite. Nitrogen molecules are larger than Oxygen (even though atomic weight is less) so pressure drop over time due to the fact that tires aren't completely "air tight". Now to start with even with "regular" air your already at 80% nitrogen. And since the process of getting pure nitrogen eliminates any water vapor there is less pressure variation due to changes in water vapor content. The later can be solved by using an dry air source. However, IMHO in the end unless it is free, offers no advantage worth paying for in consumer applications.
ktmrfs 10/30/19 11:28am General RVing Issues
RE: Brake fluid change?

HOW does moisture get to a Brake system?????? Just removing the reservoir to check fluid level is NOT going to introduce moisture(humidity) to contaminate the system. The OEM recommendations (IMO) are CYA for them. A Motorhome would be a 10 year flush and replacement. Automobile--Never. How many people out there have had an actual first hand knowledge of a Brake Failure problem/accident that was determined to be a failure to flush their Brake fluid? In 50 years of driving and 40 years in the RV service, I have never heard of such a problem on Motorhomes or Auto's. Doug newer vehicle reservoir is more moisture resistant than those of the 1960's, but by no means are imune to water introduction. Water molecules are very small, smaller than oxygen, Nitrogen and most other gases. As a result water can and does penetrate many plastics and through reservoir caps. As for failures on vehicles I've worked on, (but not maintained by me) back when rear brakes were drums, water in the fluid was often the cause of rear wheel cylinder failures which was pretty common on higher mileage vehicles that hadn't had brakes flushed. On mine, never had a rear wheel cylinder failure, but I flushed lines every year.
ktmrfs 10/27/19 05:21pm Tech Issues
RE: Remanufactured parts rant.....

long ago I gave up on most aftermarket parts, reman or new unless I knew the new part was exactly the same part as a new OEM part. Yes, OEM new parts are usually somewhat more expensive, but my experience is last WAY longer. Especially alternators and water pumps. At one time I did have a local guy that would rebuild GM alternators with better than OEM parts for about the same price as NAPA reman parts. Those I did go with and they were reliable. But alas, he is no longer around.
ktmrfs 10/27/19 05:15pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Brake fluid change?

Synthetic fluid is actually not the preferred fluid to use. It doesn't absorb moisture, this allows water pockets to form in the brake lines. Which will lead to the lines rusting and eventually failing. DOT 5 (silcone) yes water doesn't absorb, DOT 3, DOT 4, or DOT 5.1 synthetic fluids, pure BS. these fluids do NOT allow water pockets to form, ALL 3 are very hydroscopic and water will imulsify in the fluid. End result is lower boiling point. As to when to change, back in 60's and 70's when reservoirs were more open to air, even in 2 years fluid could have lots of water and junk in it. By the 90's the reservoir systems became much more enclosed and fluid didn't degrade near as much. I still pressure bleed every 2 years, but the fluid looks almost new.
ktmrfs 10/22/19 08:51pm Tech Issues
RE: 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton

seems like the first topic of feedback is payload/etc. etc. However, IMHO there are a few other differences that could sway you one way or the other. My observations. 1) Many 1/2 ton "crew cab's" have a shorter std box than a 3/4 ton. less cargo room. 2) Many 1/2 ton are shorter overall than the comparable 3/4 ton. 3) Many 1/2 tons have a lower step in height than 3/4 ton. So, before deciding just on payload etc. look at the box length, interior room, overall length and decide what fits YOUR needs and wants best. For us, a long enough short box to haul motorcycles or loads of dirt, a large back seat to take 5 adults comfortably was high priority, and I sacrificed overall length, and step in height and turning radius and went with 3/4 ton. But again that was OUR priority, decide based on YOUR priorities.
ktmrfs 10/22/19 08:45pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Interior lights cauing Radio interference

A sign of poor quality LED regulators. Well designed current regulated drivers are interference free. Cheap ones are a toss up. Units w/o current regulation don't interfere, but are subject to thermal runaway when voltage ramps up like when your charger is on in boost mode. I've had non regulated ones actually unsolder themselves. But it is hit and miss to find good 12V LED bulbs.
ktmrfs 10/21/19 08:56am General RVing Issues
RE: Cellphone boosters

This app will help you find a signal. It simply points to the cell tower. If you don't see an arrow you won't get coverage and a booster won't help. Open Signal good app, but I disagree with the no arrow booster won't help. Many a time I've been in places with no service, so the app won't point to a tower and once I hook up the weboost I get a useable signal and the app points to nearby tower(s) and the booster gives me at least voice service. For cell service to work, the PHONE must have enough power to ping a nearby tower, and the tower must be able to then give enough signal for the phone to recieve. The PHONE output power is the weak link in the system in almost all cases. That's where the booster comes into play. And in car phones such as onstar ATT have more output power than a handheld, IIRC the same power as a booster will give you. so at times while folks with ATT have no service my onstar phone gives nice service and internet access. Get far enough away from a tower and yes, booster won't solve the problem.
ktmrfs 10/17/19 09:34am Technology Corner
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