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 > Your search for posts made by 'landyacht318' found 140 matches.

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RE: How much SOLAR?

If one is considering parking facing the sun and putting a solar panel behind windshield, I found wattage was cut by slightly more than 1/2 through my windshield as opposed to resting at the same angle on top of it. 200 watts of portable altered to face the sun several times a day might be enough for you. The furnace fan is likely to be a big variable. There are much cheaper battery monitor options recently available so one can know their actual use with some accuracy. Even the best ones are not 100% accurate and still need regular rezeroing once the batteries are known to be truly full, to be in the 90's. Its gonna be hard to have too much solar, and quite easy to have too little. Too much, means happier batteries and less stress. too little means worrying about every load and reaiming the portable panels more often.
landyacht318 11/11/19 01:50pm Tech Issues
RE: Tow Vehicle Battery and Alternator

The original wiring from alternator to starting battery and its fuse was likely not intended to carry an additional 40 amps. Can it, should it, will it be fine? Depends on the gauge. SO I usually recommend the alternator (+) stud when it is easily accessible and one can stack another ring terminal on it. There is an advantage in that if one takes power from starter battery, there should be an additional fuse added near battery + terminal, but if one takes it from the alternator there is already a OEM fuse between alternator and starter battery and no additional fuse is needed, unless perhaps the product instructions demand it. That winch style connector on that first link I posted, is a good one, but is not moisture proof unless one makes it so by filling gaps where wires enter housing, and filling the contact area with dielectric grease. Anderson makes those types of connectors in the SB style, not the smaller powerpole 15/30/45 amp flavors that are limited to 10awg. https://powerwerx.com/anderson-sb-connectors-sb120-120amp perhap$, a better option: https://www.millsupply.com/medium-duty-truck-parts/lift-gate-hardware/liftgate-plugs-cables-sockets/ Proper wire termination is always important for long term reliable low resistance connections, so factor that into your connector choices
landyacht318 11/05/19 03:21am Tech Issues
RE: Tow Vehicle Battery and Alternator

If my DC to DC charger is rated at 40 amps (Renogy has one), would it be a bit taxing on the 150 amp OEM alternator? Any benefit to upgrading to a 220 amp alternator in this case? Secondly, do these dc to DC chargers act just like a conventional onboard RV multiphase converter? Bulk to absorption to float? From my understanding, with this setup, I would rarely get above 80% stage of charge after a 3 hour drive, right? How taxing it would be to the alternator would depend on how long your depleted batteries could suck up 40 amps, and how much other loads the alternator is having to power, like headlamps@~15 amps, blower motor on high @~18 amps, ect. My 1989 engine at 2k rpm requires 12.2 amps to run ignition and fuel pump, not including field current to alternator. Other vehicles will vary. Heating of the alternator is the issue, and how hot it gets depends a large amount on the vehicle's engine bay, and the speed one is travelling. I can max mine out at 120ish amps@ 65mph and the stator does not exceed 138f, but idling parked at 50 amps max and it shoots upto 220f in a few minutes. An alternator with a bigger rating 'should' be able to handle or exhaust the heat better. I have no experience with the DC to DC chargers sold as such, but I do believe they take whatever vehicle voltage is allowed by the vehicles voltage regulator and try to do 3 stage battery charging stepping it both up and then down once it has decided to 'float' them. I'd not want to be limited to the Renogy 40 amp max, but I have an externally regulated alternator and use a modified voltage regulator so I spin a dial to choose a voltage and watch voltmeter and ammeter respond accordingly.I had to trick my engine computer in order to do this without setting off the check engine light, but it has been a great reliable modification. I do make use of Dc to DC voltage boost, and voltage buck devices, but I have not tried to add one to a 7 pin trailer harness. I did buy a '1800' watt voltage booster to experiment with, but it was so poorly soldered and things went pop, and smoked a wattmeter rated upto 60 volts when I had it set to 24v with little load, then changed the load. I have a 150 watt voltage booster that works well considering it was sub 3$, there are 300 400 and 600 watt ones sold too. I've used this booster to equalize one battery at 16.2v from another at 12v which had a regular charger on it. Some of these have current limiting potentiometers so you could limit it to ~15 amps to save the 7 pin wiring harness. Some have done the inverter on engine battery, powering a high amp charger in the trailer, over a quality 120vac extension cord, in your situation. If the inverter can draw more than the alternator can make then it feeds off the engine battery when charging the depleted trailer batteries at a high rate. In this case a larger engine battery gives more of a cushion when rpms are low or one forgets to turn off inverter when parked. One needs to keep in mind engine starting batteries do not appreciate being cycled, and perhaps employ a marine battery instead when one is due for a new engine starting battery. There's lots of ways to get more juice from alternator to depleted trailer batteries, and no 'one' single correct way, no matter how loudly the opinion is typed. -Fat copper to trailer batteries and whatever voltage is allowed by vehicle, is what it is. Dc to DC chargers, over adequate cabling. Inverter on engine battery to feed charger on trailer battery over a good ac extension cord a simple dc voltage booster on the 7 pin wire. All are valid ways, and the choice can be influenced by what voltage the vehicle allows when the alternator is hot. The big enemy is voltage drop, as depleted batteries only getting 13.6v at their battery terminals will be accepting 1/3 to 1/2 that they would had 14.7v been reaching the terminals. I get a lot of bile about this 1/2 to 1/3 cobservation, but I have ammeters and voltmeters on my dash next to my voltage control dial, so this is actual repeatable observation and the main variable over the last 4 years has been the battery condition, 1/3 when newer, now closer to 1/2. When disbelievers call me out its like one is travelling 60mph, as indicated by a radar sign, highway milemarkers and a clock, and ones own speedometer, but someone else is saying you are only doing 48mph based on their beliefs alone. 1/2 to 1/3 the amp flow is real data, when 13.6v reaches the terminals compared to 14.7v. Other batteries might vary some, but not a lot. as far as how much charging you can get done driving in x amount of time, it is all dependent on how low your batteries were when you started charging/driving, and how many amps you can feed them and this is dependent on the voltage reaching their battery terminals. regardless, it basically is impossible to recharge lead acid from 80% to 100% charged in less than 3.5 hours assuming ideal voltages reaching battery terminals, But 2.5 hours at ideal charge voltages in the mid 14's can at least get one in the 97% state of charge range, where 13.6v might get one from 80% to 84% in the same amount of time. The more aged the batteries the longer the 80% to 100% takes, especially at lower charging voltages.
landyacht318 11/04/19 11:20pm Tech Issues
RE: Tow Vehicle Battery and Alternator

I'd run dedicated wiring so at least your trailer battery gets nearly the same voltage as the engine battery. The voltage your engine battery gets is decided by the vehicle's voltage regulator, and none of these are programmed intending to quickly and fully recharge depleted batteries. Mostly they are designed to never overcharge, and as such, will drop to mid to high 13's relatively quickly, but all vehicles will vary in the max voltage and for how long it is held. Only if your alternator was incapable of meeting all the loads applied to it would increasing its rating prove beneficial, and likely only at higher rpm, not idling. Likewise a larger better starting battery is not going to assist trailer battery charging. I'd get the following 6awg harness or similar, and run it to alternator + and a - mounting bolt. Disconnect the connector manually when parked for any length of time so trailer cannot discharge engine starter battery.
landyacht318 11/04/19 09:28pm Tech Issues
RE: Xantrex Truecharge2 Reliability?

New( or Uncycled slightly aged) Flooded batteries behave a bit weird in the specific gravity department in my experience. I've had SG refuse to climb on new uncycled GC batteries. I had to drain and recharge them before it rose to acceptable level, and now 3 years later and much abuse later the owner reports no issues and my hydrometer revealed only ~1 hour of 16.2v after a few hours of 14.7v was required to max them out right where I first established them after that initial deep cycle. It was not just a matter of stratification either, that first weirdness dipping them as i was moving them around, tipping them and also charging them upto 16.2v. The SG refused to get much above 1.260 until I deep cycled them then recharged them fully, then 1.275 on all. Likewise I could not achieve a full charge rested voltage on my Spanking new NOrthstar AGM until I took ~50% from it and then charged it at 25 amps until full, Then it was 13.06v full charge and stunned and scared me with the quickness at which it would crank my engine. I'd say 14.7v them until amperage stops tapering, then drain them to 60% or less, then 14.7v them for as long as it takes until SG no longer rises. If it is still too low then 16.2v. if it still does not respond suspect your hydrometer is reading low. KNowing maximum specific gravity when new and fully charged is wise, but also record the ambient and battery temperature, and note the interior cell gets warmer than the two outer when charging and the thermometer on hydrometer should register this if you allow enough time for electrolyte heat to move the thermometer level. I've also seen few new batteries have the same exact level on each cell, so the low cells when topped up later on, will appear to read weaker than teh cell which seemed to be filled highest at the factory. Noting the low cells from the factory can remove a bit of the 'WTF?' readings later, on after watering is required. As BFL states, as long as it is precise/repeatable and compared to itself in future tests, it can be inaccurate. Its just that initial maxing of specific gravity required to figure out what it the maximum is, and that might or might not require 16.2v, but I would say that it does require at least one discharge cycle on new flooded batteries. I think Mex once recommended an initial conditioning charge of 14.0v for X amount of hours on flooded GC batteries to 'cure the plates' or some such.
landyacht318 11/04/19 12:48am Tech Issues
RE: Xantrex Truecharge2 Reliability?

Meanwell, not Maxwell. My rsp-500-15 does not meet its specs, it exceeds them. The voltage range they claim is well under what I measure too As I said it will go right to 40 amps, and stay there as until battery voltage rises to the voltage setpoint I have chosen before I plugged the dc powerpoles together. My inline wattmeter says 40 amp, my shunted battery monitor, with all loads shut off will read 40 amps, my clamp on ammeter will read 40 amps. I actually have 3 more wattmeters I can plug inline with the one hardwired onto the meanwell and all will agree within 5%. 40 amps to seek and hold any voltage between 13.12 and 19.23v, well I've never tried to get it to provide 40 amps above 16.2v I doubt the unassisted heatsinking and the small yet extremely loud and powerful 40mm fan, by itself, would have allowed 5 years of regularly outputting 40 amps, but with it I have no fear of running it flat out. I have added a 60mm Noctua fan blowing inward, and an 80mm fan exhausting the steel lid of the casing. These fans keep the loud 40mm fan off completely under 64F ambients even at 40 amps, but it will still come on at higher ambients when passing 40 amps for a while. Without the extra fans the 40mm internal loud fan would cycle on and off with as little as 6 amps. I think you have to factor in these or at least some ventilation and heatsinking modifications to the meanwell vs powermax, which leans more heavily for the powermax. No speed control of the fan, like on PD 92xx series converters. The heatsinking I added, visually appears to be overkill, but they do get quite hot. As hot as it gets, I've never seen it not be able to maintain 40 amps when the loads could still ask for that much. the existing trimpot on the meanwell is not even one of the nice blue 20 turn trimpots but one of the 3 legged 270 degree tiny pots that are super difficult to adjust precisely. I had to completely disassemble the meanwell to get to the underside of the circuit board to remove the voltage trimpot and install wires. Doing this requires removing the transistors from the casing. The thermal grease makes this a potentially messy job. Snipping the legs of the trimpot to add wires to those legs would be better if one could manage that, access is tight. If going for the full disassembly, have more thermal grease on hand. I don't know for how long a pair of flooded T-105s depleted to 50% would accept 40 amps, but I'd likely want more than 40. My 50% depleted Northstar 90Ah group 27 when new would accept 40 amps for about a half hour before reaching 14.7v. 65 amps for about 22 minutes before reaching 14.7v. I don't run a generator to recharge so the VA is not a concern for me and the PFC nature of the Meanwell is not truly appreciated. Fast as possible recharge times are also not a requirement of mine, but this Northstar AGM has proven to crave high amperage from a well depleted state to restore performance when lots of full or nearly full recharges by low and slow solar only had voltage maintained under load for the same Ah removed from battery lagging.. How long the battery can accept 40 or 65 amps is another observational datapoint I've been collecting since september 2014, when I acquired and started employing the Meanwell, and the Northstar was already 10 months old by then, but used more as a stating battery and cycled only when my other flooded battery was getting EQ'd which was 2x a month. That other battery lasted ~500 deep cycles before I removed it from rv service in june 2015, but it is still going in workshop duty powering leds and fans. My Northstar then was doing double duty, cycling and engine starting while I was modifying the battery tray for a GC-15 sized battery and has been doing so alone, ever since. The Northstar proved so able to meet my needs I never completed that battery tray project and have been been cycling and starting my engine on the same battery ever since. I can carry 66% more battery capacity, I just don't need to, or want to. You will get a lot of philosophical answers regarding charging of batteries. some will say just get this and you will be 'just fine' and there is no need to stress these little things. I can tell you are a tinkerer and there is appeal to modifiying things and seeking ideal, to achieve ideal as possible battery life, within reason. I'm not trying to steer you to the Meanwell, just giving you all the info I know about it from having used it for the last 5 years as a battery charger, and a converter, and a float charger, and a maintenance charger, and yes, also as a power supply without a battery in sight. I'vwe put some hours into modifying the meanwell with more heatsinking and ventilation and the external trimpot and wattmeter, and also making sure the wiring to and from it was not stressing the circuit board receptacles. While the powermax casing is hardly as sexy as a garage charger marketed to the mass public, my meanwell is downright ugly with heatsinks and fans and wires sticking out all over the place, but its performance cannot be argued with. If my needs changed, and I were to require more battery capacity, I would want more charger, and would get a second meanwell and parallel them. A diode or 2 might be necessary. When I parallel the schumacher they combine their amperage until battery voltage rises to the max setpoint of the schumacher, which might be 14.7v or 16.4v, as the Schumacher is an unreliable whack job with little consistency. I have some voltage drop on the wiring so can exceed my voltage setpoint, and charging at 65 amps does raise battery temp quickly too, so I am there to keep voltage from going too high as amps taper and voltage drop becomes less of an issue. but in general I want max possible amps until 14.7v is reached. I dont want them tapering at 14.3v battery voltage because of voltage drop on the wiring, even though it likely makes little difference in charge times to truly full, or battery longevity. While i say i set it to 14.7v then pthen attach powerpoles, If I am paralleling the schumacher I start the schumacher first and get it to do 25 amps, then plug in the meanwell and will crank the voltage dial as high as needed to insure 40 amps output, as there is some shared wiring to the battery along which the voltage drops at high amperages. There are also some cheaper 30 and 36 amp Megawatt power supplies that are similar to the meanwell if the $ per Amp is the endgoal, and cheapo 30 amp powersupplies with adjustable voltage which appear visually identical to the megawatt available for as little as 18$, I had one but it had no thermal or current overload protections. It was rated for 30 amps yet would exceed 38 amps. and did so for 17 minutes when I got tired of twiddling the voltage pot to keep it under 36 amps, but close to that, before it released the magic smoke, and I ordered the meanwell minutes later.
landyacht318 10/27/19 02:29pm Tech Issues
RE: Xantrex Truecharge2 Reliability?

I think its awesome that Powermax has the adjustable voltage units available. Too bad they don't use an external 10 turn potentiometer for precision voltage dialing and include a 2 decimal place calibratable voltmeter. I Use a Meanwell rsp-500-15 adjustable voltage power supply as a converter,charger/portable floater, which is capable of delivering 40 amps at any voltage betwen 13.12 ans 19.23v, but it came with one of those itty bitty voltage trim pots rated for 25 cycles or something. I disassembled it and removed that tiny trim pit, installed wires in its place and ran it to a 10 turn bourns 2k OHm potentiometer, as well as added heatsinking and more ventilation, and have gotten tons of use out of it over the last 5 years. I've been doing a lot of removing trimpots installing wires in their place which then run to real potentiometers, on smaller voltage boosters or buckers or buck boosters, to use as LED dimmers or fan speed controllers. If you've done the power plug on laptop multilayer motherboards, then you will have no issue removing trimpots and doing what I have done to all my power supplies. Very few of my power supplies require a tool to change voltage anymore. When my Meanwell goes portable, I use the 45 amp anderson powerpole connectors to attach some 8 awg alligator clamps, but one can get into issues with alligator clamps, when they cant dig into a nice soft lead automotive battery post. I'd recommend bypassing any alligator clamp or parrot clamp when possible, in favor of a 75 amp or larger winch style connector, it depends on what wire size you are using . This can also remove any potential spark well away from the battery terminals. I have 45 amp anderson powerpoles everywhere, it is my universal connector and I can use to charge or power loads. I've run my 180 amp starter motor current through a pair of 45 amp anderson powerpoles in parallel, and 8mm2 wire which is really close to 8awg and a tiny 18Ah AGM battery that dropped to high 8 volt range without being able to notice any heating of the powerpole connectors. Wire thicker than 10awg needs to be destranded to 10awg gauge at the 45 amp anderson powerpole contact for crimping/soldering. The 45 amp contacts are a bit hard to crimp well without their special crimpers, but it can be done. Meanwell RPS series power supplies are power factor corrected and come in 500 750 1000 and 1500 watt versions. My 500 watt version will do 600 all day long. I've no experience with the higher rated wattage versions. MIA, Mexico wanderer does though. The larger wattage versions have voltage sense wires, both + and - and some features the 500 watt version does not. I've paralleled my meanwell with a 25 amp schumacher 'intelli' charger about 100 times now when I want 65 amps instead of 40 to achieve 14.7v ASAP, then remove the bipolar schumacher once the 40 amps of the meanwell is enough to maintain 14.7v by itself. I am not as rigorous in following manufacturer voltage recommendations as some, and I will gladly and without worry exceed their 'recommended maximum amperage'. Those 65 amps of my combined charging sources, are going into a single 90Ah AGM battery, and it is now 1 month shy of 6 years old, and about 1300 deep cycles, thousands of shallow cycles and engine starts on it, but it is nearly done. I credit the meanwell's ability to actually reach full charge, for these rather incredible figures of Lead acid battery longevity. Don't fear exceeding that 10-13% trojan recommendation. In my opinion. With an adjustable voltage charger, when you have more than enough time to plug in and reach full charge, you can lower charge rate by setting voltage lower initially and then boost it in stages to maintain a lower overall amperage. If you want. I use an OTC4619 hydrometer, but my meanwell also has a wattmeter installed on the output leads, which counts amp hours and watt hours and a few other figures, so i can determine full buy amperage accepted at absorption voltage, and on flooded batteries then verify with the hydrometer, and when the hydrometer reads full, see how many amps the battery is accepting at absorption voltage, then the next recharge just shoot for that amperage at the same absorption voltage, and skip dipping the hydrometer for a few dozen deep cycles. I love spinning a Potentiometer dial and being able to change the current flow, but 270 degree potentiometers are hard to dial in precisely, but a 10 turn/3600 degree bourns pot with a turns counter makes it easy to dial in voltage to 0.01v. When one has a voltmeter and an Ammeter, and one can see just how many amps the battery(s) is/are accepting at voltage X then changing that voltage by a finger twist, then Almost all the mystery about battery charging quickly dissolves into a 'Why did I not do this sooner?' How much voltage the battery maintains powering X amount of load( especially with X AH removed from the battery) is a great way to gauge battery performance and health, and see just when an EQ charge would be beneficial That feeling is then soon followed by a sneering contempt for anything which claims to do it 'automatically', and the faith some people put in their charger's green light. Especially when the hydrometer and/or ammeter reveal just how far from fully charged the battery still is when automatic has declared 'good enough' and refuses to be tricked into reseeking and holding absorption voltage for the extra time needed to actually achieve full charge. Regarding storing the batteries with no charging source. If the temps are cold, then self discharge slows, so disconnect them when not in use to eliminate any parasitic draw. Their self discharge will increase with age( and higher ambient temperatures), but if you make sure to use distilled water and not allow any contaminants in the cells when watering then, it self discharge does not get hugely worse with age, compared to less pure water, or inadvertently washing detritus into the cells when watering which can be difficult to achieve on 12v batteries whose cell caps are recessed and ganged 3. Since you have soldering skills, and wanted to modify the tiny trimpot on a powermax, I thought you should know about the Meanwell power supply option. While you have to provide your own AC input, and DC output wiring to it, you can likely save money, even over the reasonably priced powermax option. As i said the 750 watt and higher version of the Meanwell rsp power supply might have other considerations to getting them functioning as a battery charger. I know of One guy who bought a 750 watt version could not get it to work properly and returned it for a 500 watt version which he claimed was outputting 50 amps, where mine maxes at 40. What the issue was with the meanwell rsp- 750-15, I could not discern through the internet . If MExwanderer checks in you can ask him, or shoot him a PM. Make sure to get the -15 version, not the -12, as the -12 might not go into the 15's or higher, and you want 16.2v for EQing flooded Trojan's
landyacht318 10/26/19 09:14pm Tech Issues
RE: How to tell if fuel pumps are running by current draw?

Since you ordered 2 hall effect ammeters, know that the instructions say each display is calibrated to the sensor it arrived with and not to mix them up. I added about 6 feet of wire in the center of 3 wire ribbon cable. The ring sensor should not be exposed to the elements. I did not want To put mine in engine compartment and didn't. Might want to find somewhere to put ring sensor while you wait for their arrival. Or a way to shield it from radiant heat and moisture, and perhaps within the 2 meters distance of the ribbon cable length they provide. On mine, The voltage display was 0.2v off. Low, if i remember correctly, but i have it set to display only amperage as i have separate voltmeters with sense leads to battery that can be calibrated. You could wire yours to read fuel pump voltage. You then might see its connector getting sub 10vdc due to undersized wiring and 29 year old high resistance connections that get only worse in the high ambient heat where your problems arise. Order yourself some caig deoxit d5 or d100 and clean every connection on the fuel pump circuit. I was more interested in the hall effect ammeter link which also displayed amp hours and watt hours flowing unidirectionally. Just saw that product first time yesterday. My ~ 15psi system in tank fuel pump on my 89 dodge la318 tbi is about 4.2 amps.
landyacht318 10/11/19 07:19pm Tech Issues
RE: How to tell if fuel pumps are running by current draw?

Ammeter shunts usually go on the negative, some absolutely have to be on the negative. If you get a hall effect DC ammeter you can slide one positive wire through it and get a good idea of amperage flow, since running the ground through shunt might require one put shunt close to fuel tank. My fuel pump ground is nearby tank on the frame rail. The hall effect sensors will not yield rock steady though, depending on RFI/magnetism in the area of the sensor. I like the logic of your approach. My dash gauges for fuel and coolant temp require 5v, and I replaced the old school mechanical regulator with a solid state sealed adjustable buck converter. Years later mid roat trip, I noticed the coolant temp gauge reading higher, but my K type thermocouples on a few key locations were reading as they always had and I knew the coolant gauge was reading incorrectly and I avoided a lot of anxiety. Later, I put a 4 decimal place voltmeter on the output of dash regulator and saw it had drifted to 5.6553 volts. I reset it to 5.0002v and coolant temp gauge was where it should have been and removed voltmeter. A year later or so I noticed coolant gauge later drifted up again while Ktype thermocouples stayed as they always had, and I relocated the voltage bucker's potentiometer so I couldeasily reach it from driver's seat and reattached the voltmeter and was back up at 5.32v. I put it back to 5.000 and it has stayed there for a few months now. I got one of these hall effect ammeters on my dash reading current into or out of my battery: https://www.amazon.com/bayite-Digital-Current-Voltage-Transformer/dp/B01DDQM6Z4/ref=sr_1_7?keywords=bayite+ammeter&qid=1570775614&sr=8-7 I had it measuring total alternator output for a few months before moving the sensor to read amps into or out of the battery instead. It is not rock steady and will bounce upto 0.75 amps above or below actual worst case, but usually is about 0.3a + or - actual. https://www.ebay.com/itm/DC300V-100A-200A-400A-Hall-Effect-Coulometer-Digital-Voltmeter-Ammeter-Sensor/223151298689?hash=item33f4da9881:m:mIvp1f5fhjq7eIfv_BWIFew This one I have no experience with, but once you sort out your issues this can be relocated/repurposed to be more useful. The inner diameter of the hall effect sensor is 3/4 inches so pretty big ring terminals on preterminated battery cables can be run through it, but not a post clamp. Lots of Hall effect ammeters now available, the second link was the first available on a search, and the first link was just the product I've been using for a few years now, and have experience with. Good luck Diagnosing the issue.
landyacht318 10/11/19 12:50am Tech Issues
RE: AGM Mystery Capacity Crash Below 75% SOC UPDATE

BFL13, put an ammeter on the output of your adjustable voltage powermax. Best 20$ you will spend this month. I just bought this one in the 50 amp version for my 40 amp meanwell, ships from Canada, should a got the 100amp: https://www.ebay.com/itm/50A-100A-Voltage-DC-Voltmeter-Current-Power-Meter-Energy-tester-Charger-Ammeter/264288477006?hash=item3d88d21f4e:m:mZfKuBsQ86hjmFx0ncyeQTAhttps://www.ebay.com/itm/50A-100A-Voltage-DC-Voltmeter-Current-Power-Meter-Energy-tester-Charger-Ammeter/264288477006?hash=item3d88d21f4e:m:mZfKuBsQ86hjmFx0ncyeQTA I like the external shunt and the very small clear OLED display. The amperage is quite accurate, and has a tiny trim pot to dial it in closer. Voltage on mine reads 0.1v low, which irritates me greatly, but I'll get over it. Its unidirectional. Just counts juice flowing in one direction. Volts ,amps, watts, amp hours, watt hours, and has an ambient temp sensor on the backside of the display too. I put 45 amp anderson powerpoles on mine input and output, can discharge the battery with a load for x amount of time, note the Ah and WH Flip input and output around, reset it, then charge it, see how much WH and AH it takes before amps taper to 0.5% at Vabs. Plenty of space in the casing of the Powermax to install the display in a rectangular hole you cut with a dremel and cut off wheel, with lid removed, and while you are in there get rid of the 270 degree potentiometer and install a Bourn's 10 turn potentiometer of the correct value. Makes fine tuning voltage to the 0.01v so much easier than the provided potentiometer.
landyacht318 09/28/19 11:54pm Tech Issues
RE: AGM Mystery Capacity Crash Below 75% SOC UPDATE

Was it this thread that the topic of constant current loading was discussed? This item claims to be a constant current device no matter the battery voltage. https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/G4QAAOSwxJlc8Izz/s-l500.jpg width=320 If it works as described, one just needs the 77 degree water bath to achieve accurate capacity results. https://www.ebay.com/itm/150W-200V-20A-Constant-Current-Electronic-Load-Battery-Discharge-Capacity-Tester/153508103140?hash=item23bdcbc3e4:g:6e8AAOSwZwxc8Iz1
landyacht318 09/27/19 01:52am Tech Issues
RE: AGM Mystery Capacity Crash Below 75% SOC UPDATE

China's cheapest agms have their time and place. You've found their limitations in actual use with tools knowledge and observational focus that few ever bother with. Agms on automotive forums seem to be viewed as magical upgrades that are immune to anything a human can do to them. Marketer's sense more profit, More bonuses and more shiny objects obtainable for their significant others who are enraptured by such things and judge everything and everybody by them. Cheap as possible agms made in usa now can compete with China's cheapestfree shipping online agms in autoparts stores nationwide, and will proudly state deep cycle on their stickers too. The deka intimidator agm tested horribly in actual deep cycle use, although east penn can certainly make top quality if the profit motive is there. It is not. Any battery can be marketed for deep cycle use. Whether it is built for actual deep cycle use is apparently now irrellevant, if it gets in the way of max profit. Many batteries that are 'still going strong' according to their owners, would likely also jump off a cliff if subjected to your high occassional loads below 75%soc But ignorance is indeed bliss,for a while anyway. Then it's finger point city.
landyacht318 09/24/19 01:27pm Tech Issues
RE: This charger/converter + this battery = ?

Ive installed more than one pd9245 delivered here in california with the wizard. The measured voltages at output were slightly above specs. And pushbutton 4 more hours of 14.56v is a great feature, however no doubt some will stomp their feet at the temerity of a product forcing them to do anything.
landyacht318 09/19/19 12:15pm Tech Issues
RE: Is flooded equalization charge always timed?

While following a recipe perfectly is of course ideal, often ideal cannot be easily achieved. The goal of EQing a battery is maximum specific gravity with minimal acceptable abuse. I can get batteries there without following the recipe exactly, I just did so yesterday on what 'might' be the exact same batteries as Wopachop, and these batteries will get drained to 10.5v as they work for a living and their owner simply don't shiv a git. His converter is an Iota dls-45 I installed some 5 years ago. I tell him to plug in for 3 days after an outing then hit the disconnect I added. The interstate gc2s are 3 years old and yesterday was their first watering afaik, and their second EQ besides when i first got them. The screwy31 has been walking dead for year and years now, often ignored, and still going. The concrete under it is surrounded by a dam of baking soda and chewed away inside that barrier. I bring it up as an example that perfection of process can be skewed pretty heavily, and still yield more than acceptable results. I took the screwy31 out of my rig in june of 2015, and it mostly sees a 100 watt south facing panel daily and charge controller that attempts to achieve absorption voltage for 2 hours a day. It provides upto 30Ah nightly 5 days a week. Its charge efficiency factor is horrible, but solar is free, so i dont care. It's self discharge is likely 2% a day or higher. also not a factor. It got some attention yesterday only as I had my meanwell unscrewed from my rig's electrical cabinet door and a 2/3rds a gallon of distilled handy. When it becomes a 10.5v battery, I'll likely core charge it toward a new high $$ AGM, and my equal aged and impressive Northstar-27 AGM will assume its place in workshop duty even if it is still a viable dual purpose cycler and engine starter at that time.
landyacht318 09/14/19 05:12pm Tech Issues
RE: Is flooded equalization charge always timed?

I found on one screwy battery that what took close to 4 hours at 15.5v took 45 minutes at 16.2v. 45 minutes was more desirable, for me. 1.283 might be as high as it goes.
landyacht318 09/14/19 03:29pm Tech Issues
RE: Is flooded equalization charge always timed?

14.7 or 14.8, I am not much concerned, its not like 14.81v and Kaboom! I've certainly got voltage drop from meanwell to battery terminals I'm not much concerned, as I just twist that voltage dial slightly higher to compensate, and lower it when the amps start tapering to prevent crass overvoltage. Do you have the glass turkey baster style hydrometer? There's no point in performing an EQ without it, not until you have done it several times and find that specific battery's pattern. I am not achieving perfect constant 5% current to 16.x v. I'll go as high as 16.2v and hold it there until SG no longer rises and or amps start rising or heat build up becomes obvious. Really all three of these things seem to happen at neatly the same time. I've also had less than 5% instantly take the battery to 16.2v while the SG was still low, I just held it there until it rose. I hold voltages as high as 16.2v until SG stops rising, or amps start rising or rate of temperature increase accelerates.
landyacht318 09/14/19 01:14am Tech Issues
RE: Is flooded equalization charge always timed?

I eq'd some 3 yr old costco interstate gc2s today. Not sure when they were last charged. Put my meanwell set to 14.8v on them. 32 initial surge amps tapered to 1.1 amps in about 45 minutes Electrolyte level in cells midway. All cells 1.260 +/- 0.003. Crank up meanwell to about 11 amps. This is 15.64v. 12 minutes later specific gravity has not budged. Amps tapered to 7.65. Crank it back up 11 amps. This is now 15.92v 10 minutes later amps holding at 11. Specific gravity jumped to 1.270 10 minutes laterthey are accepting 9.92 amps@15.92v sg 1.275. Crank it back upto 11 amps and now 16.11v 8 minutes later 1.280 same amperage and voltage. 10 minutes later 1.283 same voltage but amps rose to 12.67. Terminate eq charge. Topped up cells with distilled water. Set it to 15.5v. 6 amps. 15 minutes later 15.5v ampsrose to 6.97 did not bother checking SG. Remove meanwell, clean off whitefuzz from hold down hardware,and go home.terminals still coated in red wheel bearing greaseiput there last year, and corrosion free Top up screw31 in workshop with remaining distilled. 2 cells plates were exposed. Relatively slow Charge still in progress, but it was accepting 40 amps briefly at 14.7v before i cranked the dial way down to low mid 13s and sub 11 amps. But some of that was powering leds and fans. Got to go raise voltage now in a few stages. Perhaps dip the hyddrometer.perhaps just watch the ammeter and terminate when amps stop tapering and begin rising. If the screwy31s performance was judged solely by the ability to power 12 to 30ah each night. Then i could say it still going strong!!!! But the fact that 100 watts of dedicated solarpanel can no longer get the battery above 14.2v,even when not discharged the night before, In strong sun all day.....speaks otherwise.
landyacht318 09/13/19 09:19pm Tech Issues
RE: New Coach Batteries

landyacht318 does your AGM behave in the same manner as BFl13's? Yes and No. When newer, below about ~750 deep cycles or so, amps would simply keep tapering to 0.0X if left at 14.7v indefinitely. From 750 to ~1000 deep cycles it would not taper much if any below 0.3v at 14.4 to 14.7v, but remain steady(90Ah capacity). A high amp recharge from a well depleted state would return its ability to taper to 0.2 amps before rising, but many low and slow recharge cycles and it would stop tapering above 0.4 amps and plateau or slowly start rising. Now in the 1200 deep cycle range, and approaching 6 years of age in November, the amps do not taper below 2.1 amps and once they bottom out they start rising, and so does battery temperature at that point. High amp recharges at this point, from a well depleted state, do not change this minimum amperage at absorption voltage, but do affect voltage retention during subsequent overnight discharge cycles. But what i find surprising is the voltage retention during overnight usage. For the Ah removed, the voltage retained under load has remained impressive. It is still better than any previous flooded group 27 or marine battery even when they were new, at least until ~55 to 60Ah from full. I can pull 55Ah from it at upto 2x the 20 hr rate load, and will still read 12.0+ volts under a 5 amp load and rebound to 12.15 range with most of the loads removed. It can still accept 65 amps for more than 15 minutes before voltage rises to 14.7v when discharged below 50%. if it were not for the voltage it falls to when engine starting, and the amps never being able to taper to 0.5% of capacity before beginning to rise again, I would proclaim the battery to be 'still going strong' but it has to be approaching the end, I assume. I bought a UB12180 AGm battery Last December for when Mine can no longer start my engine on its own. This Ub12180 battery was difficult to get to taper to 0.5% of capacity when new and rarely now either, though I do not cycle it often, mostly just hold it at 14.7v for a few hours each week on its own ammeter unless I use it to jumpstart someone else, then I recharge it immediately. Once amperage at absorption voltage bottoms out, there, or above there, amperage instantly starts rising along with temperature and if I do not reduce voltage or remove charger, I assume both amperage and temperature would keep rising. While I can't argue with plate thickness being an obvious attribute for a deep cycle battery, I also cant argue that this Thin Plate Pure Lead Northstar AGM battery has far exceeded my expectations as far as deep cycles accumulated and dual purpose ability. It is still able to easily meet my needs, as long as I ensure the regular true full recharge, and it can still easily start my engine 55Ah from full in mild/warm ambient temperatures. When it does need replacement, I'll go well out of my way to acquire another, perhaps stepping up to a G31 instead of a 27, and pay top $ for it, even though I could have a lifeline g31-XT delivered to me fresh from West Covina, for similar price.
landyacht318 08/30/19 09:16pm Tech Issues
RE: New Coach Batteries

How soon before this thread too, devolves into politics? 5.4.3.2.1.....
landyacht318 08/30/19 05:14pm Tech Issues
RE: New TV reception

When Dtv was new, I wound up making a tiered bowtie antenna with some vhf arms reaching out towards the towers still broadcasting signals on those frequencies. I was rather amazed at how many stations I got from mt wilson some 92 miles away. But TV fool said what would be my strongest channels, were not, and stations that should have been weak were strong. When the novelty of having 80 channels wore off I quit bothering aiming it so precisely. The tiered bowtie antenna was large and a pain to set up and lower and when I went of a roadtrip I just wanted a small easy omni antenna to get the main networks when somewhat close to towers. To my complete surprise i was still able to get 75% of the channels that I could get with the tiered bowtie antenna sticking as high as 12 feet in the air and precisely aimed at Mt wilson. This antenna did better than a full size antenna master tv antenna nearby did so my tiered bowtie antenna was no slouch, but this tiny 16 inch long single rabbit ear omni antenna's reception was impressive to say the least. So much so I have never bothered hooking up the tiered bowtie antenna again. I do have 2 of these antennas on an A-B switch, in slightly different orientations and if I can't get a channel on one I slide the switch and can usually get it on the other antenna or if LA stations are seeming weak I see of their equivalent SD stations are coming in. I gave up on the reasons why I get stations I should not be able to and can't get stations I should be able to according to Tvfool.com There has to be some good reason, but at this point it is what it is and if I can't get the station I want with my tiny single rabbitt ear antenna, I bust out a book instead.
landyacht318 08/29/19 09:06pm Tech Issues
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