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 > Your search for posts made by 'mbloof' found 54 matches.

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RE: Host, Eagle Cap, Lance Suspension Requirements

We ordered the Host Everest. Due for delivery April 2022. For now, we will have the Torklift tie downs installed with stableloads. Drive home ( over Snoqualmie Pass ) and see if we need anything else. Our trips are mainly to the Tucannon area, the St Joe River in Idaho, and Babb, Montana. I see you bought already... some good points where made here: 1. Weight is weight. (it does not matter which brand it is) 2. Get the camper loaded and do a test drive FIRST before you spend any money on suspension aids as the test drive will tell you: A) Are your headlights pointing correctly? A camper will make most trucks 'squat' a few inches. How much is to much depends on the truck. IMHO: having oncoming traffic flash their headlights at you when you have the low beams on is to much. B) Do you have 'to much' sway? Having a top heavy load like a modern camper in the bed will induce sway. Some people can tolerate more than others. C) While loaded up ready for camping is the truck level side to side? Some campers place more weight on one side then the other. While there are many folks that simply add tie downs (and optional 7-pin in the bed) and drive their truck ASIS/ASWAS from the factory, others do all sorts of suspension aids to help solve issues A-C above. - Mark0.
mbloof 05/21/22 08:41pm Truck Campers
RE: Lance TC - lithium - DC-DC charger question

Another factor is to keep the input voltage high enough so the DC-DC buck/boost converter can maintain the set output amps and voltage to the camper battery. This is a separate issue from fusing the input side for its wire size, and having the input wire gauge match the input amps.I think your on the right track here. For camper applications, we have the wiring of the truck, then the connector(s), pigtail and then the wiring in the camper itself. I swear my 97 Ford had 18AWG wiring! I tapped the output of the alternator and ran to a solenoid (switched on with the engine running) and 6AWG to ~1' of the 7Pin and then spliced in as large of a AWG wire as I could fit. The ground went from the 7Pin to the trucks frame. At least Lances have 8AWG wire in their pigtails, a quick look at the wire sizes used in most 7Pin cables is 14AWG. :( My NL uses 10AWG to go to the battery. Lets face it, all wire has resistance and higher currents will create higher voltage drops. Depending on efficiency of the step up charger/converter itself (which BTW 'stepping up' a voltage is difficult to do with anything resembling 'efficient') it could be easily trying to draw 50-60A on the input. However, given the wiring in the camper itself (and the batteries state of charge) the battery may never see 40A of charge current. For example I recently viewed the charge current at the battery after a 2-day trip that the PD6045Li I have in my NL was providing when I got home. ~19A at the battery. :) Personally I'm debating getting a 20A or 40A model myself. I do know that some of them have a switch/configuration option to operate at 1/2 power. :) - Mark0NL used 15-20 ft. of 10 gauge wire for the battery to converter run on our 8-11, too. Like you we got less than 20a of charge current from our 45a PD converter. We replaced the 10 gauge with 2/0 (now get a full 45a). Used 2/0 'cause we sometimes quick charge our lifepo4 using both our 45a converter and 40a dc2dc charger at the same time (85a of total charge current). FWIW, we used a 25 ft run of 2 gauge cable from our truck's battery to the 40a dc2dc charger mounted inside the TC. 43.5a alternator/battery load with 40a of charge current. I've heard of others rewiring from the converter/charger to the batteries with similar results. Personally, I'm just looking for a 'fail safe' of sorts. If/when it might happen that I'm low on juice and digging the Yamaha out is not convenient, three button presses on the Trucks remote could not be easier. :) - Mark0.
mbloof 05/18/22 09:05pm Truck Campers
RE: Lance TC - lithium - DC-DC charger question

Another factor is to keep the input voltage high enough so the DC-DC buck/boost converter can maintain the set output amps and voltage to the camper battery. This is a separate issue from fusing the input side for its wire size, and having the input wire gauge match the input amps. I think your on the right track here. For camper applications, we have the wiring of the truck, then the connector(s), pigtail and then the wiring in the camper itself. I swear my 97 Ford had 18AWG wiring! I tapped the output of the alternator and ran to a solenoid (switched on with the engine running) and 6AWG to ~1' of the 7Pin and then spliced in as large of a AWG wire as I could fit. The ground went from the 7Pin to the trucks frame. At least Lances have 8AWG wire in their pigtails, a quick look at the wire sizes used in most 7Pin cables is 14AWG. :( My NL uses 10AWG to go to the battery. Lets face it, all wire has resistance and higher currents will create higher voltage drops. Depending on efficiency of the step up charger/converter itself (which BTW 'stepping up' a voltage is difficult to do with anything resembling 'efficient') it could be easily trying to draw 50-60A on the input. However, given the wiring in the camper itself (and the batteries state of charge) the battery may never see 40A of charge current. For example I recently viewed the charge current at the battery after a 2-day trip that the PD6045Li I have in my NL was providing when I got home. ~19A at the battery. :) Personally I'm debating getting a 20A or 40A model myself. I do know that some of them have a switch/configuration option to operate at 1/2 power. :) - Mark0
mbloof 05/15/22 11:20pm Truck Campers
RE: Lance TC - lithium - DC-DC charger question

+1 over thinking it. Back in the day, my buddy bought a Lance. Included in the installation was a 8AWG wire ran from the battery to a 50-100A solenoid (switched on/off with the ignition/engine running) a 40-50A fuse and 8AWG wire from the fuse to the Lance connector. He could easily run his fridge on DC and/or charge his house battery(s) with the truck running. Granted this setup won't charge the camper battery(s) all the way because of voltage drops/loss of the wiring+connectors. Keep in mind that for current to flow there needs to be a voltage difference. Fast forward to 2021 and LiFePo4 batteries are all the rage. While IMHO they are a better option then FLA batteries by all accounts, they do need/require a higher charge voltage then FLA batteries. While there are a number of options available to accomplish this a popular one is to employ a DC-DC charger. (there are a number of different OEM's that make them and each have a number of different models to choose from) - Mark0.
mbloof 05/14/22 11:45am Truck Campers
RE: Gas fridge on the move?

I have a 98 Lance and it has always had trouble running on gas if speed is over ~50 mph as the flame gets blown out causing the check light to come on, otherwise it works great on gas. May have been your problem with a cross wind as you say it worked before. If it is failing while stationary could be something else. I had to replace my dometic control board after only 4 years with a dinosaur board and never had another problem. It would just shut off the gas solenoid 5 minutes to 4 hours triggering the check light. Thermocouple voltage tested fine. Was a common problem with this vintage. I use the DC mode while on the high speed roads and am careful not to leave it on DC if the truck is not running. DC works fine on the road to maintain temperature if you have at least an 8 awg wire from truck to camper battery through a 40 amp circuit breaker and an isolator solenoid. Remember that it is not on continuously and cycles just like ac or gas mode. Always pre cool the frig a day before leaving on the trip. All good advice. :) Personally, while I generally precool my fridge and put already cold stuff in it and the freezer most of my destinations are < 3hrs away and I see no issue(s) with traveling with it off - things are not going to thaw out or get warm in the time it takes to travel and then get the fridge going/cooling again. It should be noted that (decades ago now) Lance recognized the problem with running the fridge in DC mode (and/or charging from the truck) and invented the "Lance connector" to solve/deal with the issue. Lance dealers would install 8AWG wire+solenoid+fuse connected to their 'special' 7-pin 'Lance connector' outfitted with 2x 8AWG wires and 5x 14AWG wires umbilical cord to the purchasers/owners Lance truck camper. Properly installed Lance campers have no issue running the refrige on DC or charging the house battery from the truck. - Mark0.
mbloof 05/12/22 10:15am Truck Campers
RE: To slide or not to slide. That is the question.

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mbloof 05/10/22 10:33pm Truck Campers
RE: Fleetwood Elkhorn

Ahhh, the Fleetwood Elkhorn... I had a 2001 8S hardside. There's a reason they were nicknamed 'Leakwoods'. As I recall the 8S is for a long bed, I hauled mine on a F250 SC LB until 2014 when I replaced it. The only aluminum in the "framing" is in the rear section/wall, everything else is wood. Fleetwood packed quite a bit of features into that little camper. I went on to do dozens of modifications to mine over the years. In its prime I could dry camp for a week at a time in it. When I was younger I did not mind the climb into the bed area ether. Sadly the only modification I was unable to do was stop it from leaking. When I got rid of it ($500 scrap) it had a number of rotted spots. - Mark0.
mbloof 04/12/22 06:10pm Truck Campers
RE: Camper basically chopped in half by tree

Love it! The news station called it a "trailer"!! hahahahahaha
mbloof 12/29/21 01:47pm Truck Campers
RE: Brain probe for 19.5 x 7.5 rims and 16" F450 Front Brakes

I had the Vision Heavy Hauler 81 rims on my F250. They were not hub centric but did have a 4500 lb rating. These rims used cone shaped lug nuts verses the flat you currently use. I paired those rims with 5000 lb rated 245/70r19.5 PR16 LRH tires. This is correct. When used with the correct lugnuts the Vision wheels are not a issue. I've used the Vision 81's on my 97' and 17' Ford without issue. I ended up with Vision 81's on my 17' because after 4 months waiting on Rickson, they never built or delivered. My local tire dealer had the Visions installed in less than a week after ordering them. - Mark0.
mbloof 12/25/21 04:36pm Truck Campers
RE: Purchasing Warped Roof 1997 Bigfoot 2500 9’6”?

The 'structure' IS the glass+foam+luanne sandwinch. While complete rebuilds are few and far between there are examples of both NL and BF being "gutted" of everything but the shell (glass+foam+luanne) and rebuilt/remodeled. These examples did not self destruct or collapse upon themselves. - Mark0.
mbloof 12/23/21 04:09pm Truck Campers
RE: Purchasing Warped Roof 1997 Bigfoot 2500 9’6”?

Just finished checking out the Foot, unfortunately it didn’t go to well. The water damage was severe all throughout the camper. Just about every window, cabinet, and locker had water. Soft spots all over the walls and shell. Powerful, almost dizzying musty smell throughout, along with numerous interior seams pulling apart. Carpeting under the dining table was still damp, and much of the wood was either blackened from water, or just crumbling apart. One of the anchors was cracked, and another was completely separated from the shell. Surely the jack mounts were similar. The sagging roof was probably water damage, as when I squeezed it, water dripped out of cracks in the roof hatch sealant. I offered him $3k and he countered with $6k, but to be honest I didn’t really want it at all after what I saw. Really disappointing, and a lot of expensive lessons. The owner was nice though, and gave me a snow cone. While they say that a picture is worth a 1000 words, seeing is really believing!! Contrary to the images you posted that showed a camper in good/decent condition upon actual inspection it was far from that. Don't give up, there are well maintained campers out there. However I'm afraid your going to have to waste a lot of time looking at 'duds' before finding one. best of luck on your search! - Mark0.
mbloof 12/21/21 01:05pm Truck Campers
RE: Purchasing Warped Roof 1997 Bigfoot 2500 9’6”?

Humm... only $10K for a 9.6' clamshell camper? Better run out and buy it!! Any seals (including the window ones shown here) are going to fail with age. Simple/easy/cheap to get it resealed. Problem solved. The sagging roof is likely only fiberglass/foam separation. This is what happens with these types of campers with age - the glue fails. While it can be a major issue if it is in key structural support areas (like on ether side of the pass through window) in front of the bedroom escape hatch does not look to be a real issue. The clamshell campers age well as long as (like ANY other RV) the seals are maintained. I'm surprised that they are not asking $15-20K for it knowing what the going rate of a new ones are. The biggest replacement item is the refridge. While many RV units will seemingly "work forever", they will degrade if operated to far off level for to long and are costly ($1-2K) to replace. - Mark0.
mbloof 12/14/21 07:50pm Truck Campers
RE: Upgrade RV Entertainment System

Personally, I gave up on the 'sound' my NL produced shortly after purchasing it. Others have had some success in merely replacing the OEM speakers with quality models from other vendors. My solution was to get a Bose soundlink to stream music from my phone/ipad's. While Bose no longer makes the soundlink, there are dozens of OEM's+models of bluetooth speakers available. Added benefit is that these are portable so can be brought outside to the picnic table with you while camping. I would however suggest demo'ing whatever your considering in person before buying. While some have remarkable sound others not so much. Price does not seem to dictate the quality of the sound emitted from these devices. - Mark0.
mbloof 11/11/21 09:41am Truck Campers
RE: pick up Eagle Cap 1165

Did you fill it up with gear yet? LOL - Mark0.
mbloof 10/31/21 11:02pm Truck Campers
RE: Nor Cold 2 way??

For me personally, I'll 'precool' the fridge by having the camper plugged into shore power and using the AC option 1-2 days before leaving on a trip. Then I'll transfer precooled items from my house fridge/freezer to the campers fridge/freezer. I'll usually SHUT OFF the campers fridge/freezer before pulling out of my driveway. While I live in Oregon and travel mostly in Oregon/Washington and the temperatures generally don't get higher than the 90's, I've found that the campers fridge/freezer will keep my items just fine (no matter what time of the year it is) during the 1-4 hours it takes to reach where I'm going. When I reach my destination and start setting up, the campers fridge/freezer will get turned back on set to AC (if available) and propane if AC is not available. I see/find no need for the 'DC' mode/setting at all. Obviously YMMV, - Mark0. Why do you turn it off when traveling? Generally my first stop is a station for fuel. Back in the days when I had a gas powered truck I might make multiple fuel stops along the way. While IDK about the laws where you live/travel around here its illegal to have a open flame while fueling. Besides, the stupid automatic 3-way fridges can often switch to DC and unless you have cut or otherwise disabled that element you might arrive with a drained or dead battery (it has happened to me before). A better question might be: why do you leave yours on? - Mark0.
mbloof 10/21/21 12:15pm Truck Campers
RE: Nor Cold 2 way??

For me personally, I'll 'precool' the fridge by having the camper plugged into shore power and using the AC option 1-2 days before leaving on a trip. Then I'll transfer precooled items from my house fridge/freezer to the campers fridge/freezer. I'll usually SHUT OFF the campers fridge/freezer before pulling out of my driveway. While I live in Oregon and travel mostly in Oregon/Washington and the temperatures generally don't get higher than the 90's, I've found that the campers fridge/freezer will keep my items just fine (no matter what time of the year it is) during the 1-4 hours it takes to reach where I'm going. When I reach my destination and start setting up, the campers fridge/freezer will get turned back on set to AC (if available) and propane if AC is not available. I see/find no need for the 'DC' mode/setting at all. Obviously YMMV, - Mark0.
mbloof 10/20/21 09:21am Truck Campers
RE: Side-Trip Report: Great Salt Plains SP, OK

Thanks for sharing.
mbloof 10/19/21 06:34am Truck Campers
RE: Extended warranty experiences

So the question I have is why someone would buy something with questionable reliability and then have to bandaid the purchase with an extended warranty. At least in my view, I would look at purchasing something that worried me less about failure. Indeed. However when it comes to pickup truck campers any "reliability" comes down to two basic items: The Appliances The Sealing (does it leak) For the first item, all OEM's use the same appliance (and Jack) vendors. Granted while some of us get years and years of use without issues others see failures quite often. That brings us to how well is the unit sealed. While some are built and sealed better than others, many OEM's recommend at least checking the seals up to 2x a year and often complete reseal every few years. Which brings us to the conclusion that one brand or model of pickup truck camper is not going to be "more reliable" then the next, it is simply the luck of the draw (when it comes to appliances) and storage/use/inspection patterns the end user/owner apply to their unit. While RV shop rates are astronomical as compared to doing it yourself consider that the most expensive item in a truck camper is a new RV fridge is ~$1200ea a extended warranty may or not make any sense. - Mark0.
mbloof 10/11/21 06:43am Truck Campers
RE: Extended warranty experiences

Sorry to hear of your troubles. I too got the "hard sell" from my camper dealer - I finally told them that I was terminal and had no need for an extended warranty. :) While that shut them up, the service manager still did the hard sell with a well rehearsed fake story about a shore power dongle/protector. :) BTW: I also bought a 8yr extended warranty on my new 2017 Ford truck as here +4yrs later I have less than 10K miles on it (only use it for hauling the camper and camping). :) cheers, - Mark0.
mbloof 10/08/21 11:55am Truck Campers
RE: Regrets with 19.5" tires? Places you havent been able to go?

I switched over to 19.5's in 2014. While I don't drive on beaches or have been caught in the snow there are a number of options with mountain/snowflake available in the 19.5 sizes. I like the peace of mind that my tires are not the 'weakest link' and I'll likely replace them due to age rather then wearing them out. - Mark0.
mbloof 10/04/21 11:34am Truck Campers
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