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 > Your search for posts made by 'msturtz' found 35 matches.

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RE: Resent 2016-2019 Jayco qualiity?

Get everything in writing period. Don’t pay any attention to anything anyone tells you that isn’t in writing. If someone tells promises something verbally follow up with an email to that person confirming the contemporaneous conversation. While there is a lot of good information in this post, this section is completely wrong. I can tell you as an attorney this is incorrect. Because you send an email to someone "confirming" what they said does not mean they actually said it, or if they did if you did not misunderstand and your email then contains your misunderstanding. Most states have laws that specifically disallow any verbal contractual agreements. Unless it is in writing with both party's signature, you do not have an enforceable agreement. Another thing to consider is if the signor for the company has the authority to make the commitment. You are absolutely correct that an email follow up confirming a verbal representation does not create or modify a verbal contract. Not only do many states disallow verbal contracts every purchase and sales agreement that I have seen does as well. However, what I was referring to are representations of material fact to induce me to purchase the RV or vehicle. For example I have had sales people state “…yes the rig has a locking differential or electronic limited slip…” or “…yes the rig has a spare tire…” or “…yes we will replace all the batteries with new prior to delivery…” when in fact we discovered post-delivery that it did not. I have had many cases where a salesperson told me something that ended up not being true but because I documented to them in an email confirming the verbal conversation the company honored what they said. Now, there have been things that were so important to me that while in the F&I office I hand write what we actually agreed to such as optional components or features of a particular vehicle that were material to the purchase. The F&I manager usually doesn’t like it but I have never had them kill a deal because I insisted that they document on the agreement our complete agreement. When normal people take 15 – 20 minutes in the F&I office we have taken 1 – 2 hours because we read the entire contract and insist that everything be documented for the terms and conditions of the entire deal. I refuse to even accept the “we owe” paperwork stand alone because of the “…entire agreement…” clauses baked into some purchase agreements. If the dealer does what they say they would do and the vehicle includes exactly what the sales person stated it does then everything is great. I can tell you I have literally had a member of a dealership senior management in front of me and call a salesperson and the sales person lie to them and state that they never said the vehicle had that feature. Then I calmly pull out the email thread to that exact salesperson that was sent contemporaneous to the stated conversation. That didn’t go well for the sales person. Because I had the documentation and proof of what I was told they couldn’t dispute it. Again, yes for anything covered under the terms of a written agreement cannot be modified by anything verbal. However, at least for representations other than sales puffery it can’t hurt to have it in writing. Usually, I ask that the sales person reply to confirm what was discussed to avert any dispute.
msturtz 10/18/19 04:16pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Resent 2016-2019 Jayco qualiity?

We had a Jayco towable and were very happy with it. The quality was good and we used it a lot. We made the mistake of purchasing a Jayco Motorized without really considering other brands. Jayco's motorized units are much more expensive than other comparable units. The mistake we made is in assuming that the quality carried over from their towable units. Worse yet their customer service was a complete disaster. Here is the bottom line from our experience from purchasing multiple RVS. Regardless of the brand pay for a complete pre-purchase inspection. It should cost between $400 - $800. Make the purchase contingent on the inspection. Don’t warn the RV seller or dealer that you are having a formal pre-purchase inspection. After you have an agreed price and deal but before you sign or take final delivery tell them you need to have a day with the unit to measure the drawers and other things for ordering anti-skid mats and other things for the unit. You can tell them that you need a weight from a certified scale with all the tanks full that way they will fill the water tanks and have all the plumbing working for your inspection. You can insist on this. Many units are overweight before you even load your stuff! Get everything in writing period. Don’t pay any attention to anything anyone tells you that isn’t in writing. If someone tells promises something verbally follow up with an email to that person confirming the contemporaneous conversation. Finally, expect that the unit you like – regardless of manufacturer – will have flaws such as loose screws, water leaks, broken drawers, malfunctioning equipment, incorrectly installed or wired components. Don’t get discouraged this is all normal for hand built units as complex as RVs. The independent pre-purchase inspection gives you leverage to ensure that everything is the way you expect and or get commitments from the seller as to timeframes as to when you will actually be able to use the unit. Alternatively, you may chose to tell the seller that you will finalize the deal and take delivery after the list of items has been fixed. That way you are not paying for a unit that you can’t use and its stuck in the shop for months on end because they have no motivation to get it fixed quickly. The RV dealers don’t fix RVs that have problems when they are sitting on their lot for sale. They wait for them to be sold and then they fix the defects. Our current unit spent a lot of time in the shop in the first two years (Not a Jayco!) but now that everything is fixed we are happy with it.
msturtz 10/18/19 10:26am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Would this be crazy??

We went with a motorhome and absolutly love it. It is vastly easier to use.
msturtz 09/10/19 10:03pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

Almost everything I read here I can do with my 40" TT. I have had to hook up in the rain (20 minutes tops)but most of the time if we are leaving in the morning I pull in the slides except the bedroom and unhook the sewer and water AND TV THE NIGHT BEFORE( ALL OF WHICH YOU HAVE TO DISCONNECT IN A MH.) Our water and toilet work of course when we are between sites. Our trailer has auto level so I just push a button and when we reconnect it raises the gear and puts the tongue at the hook up level. We have almost zero costs and the tires which we replace after 60,000 miles are about 500 bucks in a Class A they can run 2400 bucks and the other maintenance is also expense and not readily available in several areas and God help you if you need something major as it can be weeks for the repair. The only other thing I can think of as a deterrent is the space my TT slides open further and I have more usable space. Lastly is cost my TT costs 48000 how much is a MH? 180 to 500 thousand that is a large investment almost as bad as owing a sailboat!!. Your TT seems very nice. To be safe I had a $3000 Hensley hitch which adds cost. Your point about tires being less expensive is correct however I went through about 6 tires in 10 years in my towable unit because the ST tires are not made to the same standards that Motorhome tires are. With my motorhome if the weather is going to be poor I routinely disconnect everything but power since it has 110 gallons of fresh water and a 50 gallons black and grey capacity. With automatic generator start I don't worry about requiring power. We spent over 3 days dry camping in 100F heat in a farmer's field with the ACs running. I could not have done that period with a TT. I would have had to refill both water and gasoline for the generator at least once. We had a situation with our motorhome when the power went out and the AGS system kicked the generator on automatically and the rig was nice and cool and the batteries were not dead. I know of very few towable units that have this technology. It isn't that it isn't possible. My point is that if the fewer features available in the towable market work for a person then great it can be much less expensive, however if you want or desire the more advanced features available in the motorized market then that can be a good value as well because by the time you add all the features you get with a motorized unit to a towable unit you are in the same price range with the same features. Bottom line feature for feature, item for item if you have equivalent features both platforms cost a similar amount. Now if a person already has a suitable truck then the equation changes quite a bit. Each person's situation is different. For us, we couldn't handle a towable due to our kids being born prematurely. In addition, I have some health issues that make handling the extra work of a towable harder to do. We have found that we make many more trips than we ever did with a towable because it is so much easier. Even with a toad I can be hooked up and ready to go in a few minutes where with a trailer this isn't even close, it takes a long time to get hooked up and ready to leave. Never needed a Hensley. My hitch has been on 6 TT. your excuses for having a Class A are noted but not the rule. A Class A is not even close in cost. 250,000 compared to 48000 for a TT is not even close. As for my truck it has uses other than camping and is needed for my runs up the slab to our northern house. If you want to time a hook up with me you had better practice often, we put on 1000's of miles a year as I can normally be on the road is 20 minutes in an rain storm. Tires are far better now and as for weather that is what GPS was invented for .... to miss the big issues on the road. I'm sorry but quoting made up numbers for the cost of a motorhome is not helpful to the OP. Our current DP we purchased new was being advertised when we bought it for about $130K. Used is much less. We priced out a new diesel truck plus the extra fuel tank etc. and the cost was well over $75K, an equivalent towable with auto level and generator, glass wall, satellite, 2K inverter, AGS, massive battery bank, residential refrigerator etc. costs upwards of $100K depending on model. A gas class A can be had for less much much less than we paid for our DP. There is a huge spread between the asking price and the actual sale price when it comes to motorized. I had a very difficult time getting much of a discount on the towable unit. We did get a good deal. Bottom line we have purchased multiple towable units and motorized units. We have the actual experience for both to reliably comment rather than speculate. There are pros and cons to both depending on the use case of a particular user and I would recommend either depending on who I was talking with and what they wanted to do with it. However, blanket statements that motorized units are "always more expensive" simply are not true. It is fairly easy to find a cheap stick and tin towable on a loss leader for sale to compare to a Prevost and that is a nonsensical comparison that helps no one. What people really need is to understand the features and benefits of each platform as well as the costs of both. Sometimes the additional costs justify the additional expense in either situation. A side note on the Hensley hitch I would never have another towable without one. It is absolutely impossible to jackknife a towable with a Hensley Hitch. They operate on a 4 bar method which mechanically prevents the trailer from turning separately from the tow vehicle. We were coming back from a camping trip and got caught in a major snow storm. We were on compact snow and ice. On my one ton truck I had studded snow tires however that doesn't help with the trailer. When I had an emergency full ABS stop because I was cut off by another driver the trailer never came around the truck as it would have if I had not had a Hensley Hitch. I can't recommend them enough. They are expensive but worth every penny.
msturtz 08/27/19 03:22pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

Almost everything I read here I can do with my 40" TT. I have had to hook up in the rain (20 minutes tops)but most of the time if we are leaving in the morning I pull in the slides except the bedroom and unhook the sewer and water AND TV THE NIGHT BEFORE( ALL OF WHICH YOU HAVE TO DISCONNECT IN A MH.) Our water and toilet work of course when we are between sites. Our trailer has auto level so I just push a button and when we reconnect it raises the gear and puts the tongue at the hook up level. We have almost zero costs and the tires which we replace after 60,000 miles are about 500 bucks in a Class A they can run 2400 bucks and the other maintenance is also expense and not readily available in several areas and God help you if you need something major as it can be weeks for the repair. The only other thing I can think of as a deterrent is the space my TT slides open further and I have more usable space. Lastly is cost my TT costs 48000 how much is a MH? 180 to 500 thousand that is a large investment almost as bad as owing a sailboat!!. Your TT seems very nice. To be safe I had a $3000 Hensley hitch which adds cost. Your point about tires being less expensive is correct however I went through about 6 tires in 10 years in my towable unit because the ST tires are not made to the same standards that Motorhome tires are. With my motorhome if the weather is going to be poor I routinely disconnect everything but power since it has 110 gallons of fresh water and a 50 gallons black and grey capacity. With automatic generator start I don't worry about requiring power. We spent over 3 days dry camping in 100F heat in a farmer's field with the ACs running. I could not have done that period with a TT. I would have had to refill both water and gasoline for the generator at least once. We had a situation with our motorhome when the power went out and the AGS system kicked the generator on automatically and the rig was nice and cool and the batteries were not dead. I know of very few towable units that have this technology. It isn't that it isn't possible. My point is that if the fewer features available in the towable market work for a person then great it can be much less expensive, however if you want or desire the more advanced features available in the motorized market then that can be a good value as well because by the time you add all the features you get with a motorized unit to a towable unit you are in the same price range with the same features. Bottom line feature for feature, item for item if you have equivalent features both platforms cost a similar amount. Now if a person already has a suitable truck then the equation changes quite a bit. Each person's situation is different. For us, we couldn't handle a towable due to our kids being born prematurely. In addition, I have some health issues that make handling the extra work of a towable harder to do. We have found that we make many more trips than we ever did with a towable because it is so much easier. Even with a toad I can be hooked up and ready to go in a few minutes where with a trailer this isn't even close, it takes a long time to get hooked up and ready to leave.
msturtz 08/26/19 06:48pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

in a advent you need to evacuate my class A ready to go with my whole family yes my husky's are my family also i left no one behind. I keep can foods bottle water.fuel with treatment full,cloths,Locked box with copy of important papers needed. Up to date maps, Up to date,weather radio,Up to date GPS. You never know If fire, storms,Floods or a great get away may happen but which ever happen remember restock . This is exactly what we do! :) We keep the water tank full, stocked with sealed shelf stable non-perishable food, and at least two cases of bottled water. We also keep clothes and other critical items in the rig. If we have a major Cascadia Earthquake we will be ready! I did try to keep the trailer ready before we had the motorhome however since it took so long to hook up to move it wasn't nearly as "ready" as I would have liked. Funny anecdote, when my daughter was younger and had piano lessons I used to drop her off with the RV so I could sit in comfort and watch TV while I was waiting for her to get done. I would never ever consider doing that with a towable. We also sometimes use the motorhome for day trips simply because it is so much more comfortable than riding in a SUV or car. We did the same thing when we were touring a national park when our twins were still infants and required feeding and changing every hour or so. We just dropped the connections on the ground and left camp. Parking was harder but we didn't have any problems seeing what we wanted to. Never, not one time did we ever do this kind of stuff when we had a towable. It was simply too much work!
msturtz 08/22/19 11:24am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

The problem is that the listed 5th wheel towable unit is in no way equipped similarly to a Class A. There is a reason for the apparent price difference. For example the motorhomes come with an onboard generator and usually have a large battery bank and inverter. No one is disputing that an inexpensive 5th wheel plus the equivalent of a work truck can be purchased that costs much less than a motorhome however you are not comparing the same things either. Option for option feature for feature. Does the motorhome have an automatic leveling system? Then so should the 5th wheel trailer. I can tell you from personal experience that riding in a work truck and riding in any motorhome is not equivalent either. Nor is the fuel range equivalent either without aftermarket additional tanks which I added to my setup. The F350 gas may only have a 40 gallon fuel tank at most the motorhome has a 80 gallon fuel tank. I know about these limitations because I lived it. I used to have to carry many gas cans with me till I installed the auxiliary fuel tank. Again in any comparison it is important to consider all the facts. Since I have built a great towable setup before we got our motorhome I am acutely aware of the difference in features between both platforms. Bottom line is that it depends on the individual requirements of the person using the equipment. I have a CDL and work for a heavy truck manufacturer I look at an RV like any other tool. I try to determine what our requirements are first and then look for most logical solution that fits within the budget. I did a cursory check for 5th wheels on RV trader equipped with generators and residential refrigerators and the discounted prices start at about $90k. I am assuming that they have automatic leveling systems. I think you're "moving the goalposts". I don't see a residential fridge in the $90K class A units I searched so they are comparable to the fivers. Do they have generators? Probably. Does that close the $40K difference in my example? Hardly. I agree with Lantley's post. If you trick out the fiver, and you trick out the class A, it's still much more expensive. No, I'm not the basic 5th wheel units at that price point have much fewer features than any Class A. That is the reason for the price difference. Remember, I spent many years owning towable units. I work for a large heavy truck manufacturing company. If you have equivalent functionality and features you will have roughly the same cost. In both scenarios you have a dwelling and power unit. There is no magic in manufacturing. An engine, transmission, refrigerator, inverter, batteries, Air Conditioners and other components all cost the same regardless of whether they are installed in a 5th wheel, travel trailer or motorhome. Where you get into differences such as major missing components such as generators now you get some price differences a Cummins generator can cost well over $6K depending on model. In a typical two AC RV you would need a minimum of a 6K generator to run both ACs. Now, I am not talking about the high end Class A (gas or diesel) rigs that have tile floor and solid surface countertops etc. I'm talking about the family friendly lower cost Class A units that have vinyl floors etc. In my experience they are much better integrated than anything in the lower end towable space. To get equivalent features in a towable market you will need to go much higher end unit. Now, if those feature differences are not important to the customer then a really good deal at a much lower price point can be had in the towable market. We used towable units for many years. We restored a 1969 Terry travel trailer to usable condition years ago. That trailer only cost us $700 before we fixed it. The towable market can be a lower cost way to get into RVing if you have a suitable tow vehicle and are willing to tailor your use to fit the capability of the RV and put up with the limitations of the platform. Making blanket statements of which I have been guilty of doing myself don't help people understand the very real differences in the various options. When I help people figure out what they need I try to listen to what is important for them. I point out the things I have learned including the quirks of each platform. I have in the past been guilty of making blanket statements that equivalent towable are always less expensive. That isn't the case and is missing a lot of the factors that may or may not be important.
msturtz 08/22/19 09:33am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

You can get a brand new fully equipped 5'er with onboard genset and diesel dually combo for $150K. Can you get a brand new diesel motorhome with toad for 150K? A high end fiver without truck is 100K a high end diesel class A 250-300K Towables are cheaper and provide more bang for the buck. Class A's are more convenient and provide a better driving experience but cost more. The answer to the first question is yes you can get a DP (not high end) but a fully capable DP with fully integrated systems including automatic jacks, automatic generator start, in motion satellite system, air ride, full wall sides, and so on. I would like to point out that most people already have a vehicle that could be towed behind a motorhome so the red herring about the cost of a toad is a bit irrelevant. Not all vehicles can be flat towed but many can be on a dolly and all can be hauled on an inexpensive car hauler. It is impossible for someone who does not have a heavy duty truck to haul a 5th wheel. It is quite possible for a person to use a motorhome without a toad. We have done it many times. It is slightly less convenient yes, but quite doable. With all of this said you still would need to upfit the truck with an auxiliary fuel tank to provide the same fuel range as a DP or even a gas A unit. If a friend of mine had a 1 ton dually truck and wanted to get into RVing I would most certainly recommend they look at towable units because the truck is a sunk cost already. On the other hand if a friend had only cars and or light duty SUVs I would recommend they consider motorized. Of course all of this is dependent on how they intend on using the rig. Keep in mind that a basic 31' Class C can be had new at around $50K, a really nice Class C at about $70K or so. I have seen gas A units for slightly more. The options are endless however the basic equipment on a motorized unit is more than what you get on a towable. To get the basic equipment that comes with any motorized unit means you have to get into some very expensive towable units. To get the range requires aftermarket add ons. My ex-in laws started with towables and eventually moved to a motorhome. Having to drive around a 1 ton truck as your touring vehicle is not exactly easy either. However, they moved due to the hassle of managing the setup.
msturtz 08/22/19 08:06am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

way2roll I did a comparable search on RV Trader. I looked at new Forest River products to keep them comparable. I looked at about 35 feet long. I'm looking at gas, not diesel on both a motorhome and a tow vehicle. I see Class A motorhomes starting about $90,000. I see new 5th wheels starting about $35,000. As Don Henley says "Are you with me so far?" I looked at new gas Ford F350 DRW. That should be plenty of truck. NADA says they run about $40,000. True or false? I don't know. I suppose you can spend $75,000 on a King Ranch F350, but all of this is targeting economical and comparable. I'll figure a new economical toad, not a Jeep; say about $25,000. Here's how my numbers look. $90,000 Class A $25,000 Toad $115,000 Total $35,000 Fifth wheel $40,000 Ford F350 $75,000 Total I doubt there is $40,000 of "fudge" in my quick and dirty numbers. Steve The problem is that the listed 5th wheel towable unit is in no way equipped similarly to a Class A. There is a reason for the apparent price difference. For example the motorhomes come with an onboard generator and usually have a large battery bank and inverter. No one is disputing that an inexpensive 5th wheel plus the equivalent of a work truck can be purchased that costs much less than a motorhome however you are not comparing the same things either. Option for option feature for feature. Does the motorhome have an automatic leveling system? Then so should the 5th wheel trailer. I can tell you from personal experience that riding in a work truck and riding in any motorhome is not equivalent either. Nor is the fuel range equivalent either without aftermarket additional tanks which I added to my setup. The F350 gas may only have a 40 gallon fuel tank at most the motorhome has a 80 gallon fuel tank. I know about these limitations because I lived it. I used to have to carry many gas cans with me till I installed the auxiliary fuel tank. Again in any comparison it is important to consider all the facts. Since I have built a great towable setup before we got our motorhome I am acutely aware of the difference in features between both platforms. Bottom line is that it depends on the individual requirements of the person using the equipment. I have a CDL and work for a heavy truck manufacturer I look at an RV like any other tool. I try to determine what our requirements are first and then look for most logical solution that fits within the budget. I did a cursory check for 5th wheels on RV trader equipped with generators and residential refrigerators and the discounted prices start at about $90k. I am assuming that they have automatic leveling systems.
msturtz 08/22/19 12:36am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

I would like to point out that we have a Class A DP. Motorhome Specialist in Texas was selling my rig for about $139,000 when I purchased mine new. If I would have gone the equivalent 5th wheel plus medium duty truck capable of hauling 6 people and the 5th wheel the costs would be much higher. A 5th wheel with a 2KW inverter, generator, AGS system, residential refrigerator, satellite system, solar panels, 110 gallons of freshwater, 50 grey and 50 black, macerating toilet, and so on tends to cost well north of $100,000 to start. Now, these units typically are three axle setups that weigh in at about 20,000# which if you want to be safe means true medium duty not the fake one ton dually setups, plus if I need to haul 6 people now I really have to have a medium duty custom rig that has the additional seats for everyone. These rigs start at over $100,000 before options. Basically for me I couldn't get there. If my needs were different i.e. I had fewer people to carry or didn't need an equivalent setup then all bets are off.
msturtz 08/21/19 06:30pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

Another issue that I forgot to mention was the purchase cost. Higher end towable units with equivalent space and integrated features such as onboard generators, inverter, residential refrigerator etc. tend to be on the very high end of towable and very heavy. I made the initial mistake of purchasing a truck that really didn't have the capability to adequately tow everything we needed. Keep in mind that I had a 29' stick and tin trailer with a GVWR of 7500#. I know people will tow very heavy trailers dramatically over the GCWR of their trucks but I won’t do that. The problem is we had to carry so much additional equipment we were very heavy. Our first truck simply didn't have the capability even when I spent thousands of dollars upgrading it. We ended up trading it in for a 1 ton long box crew cab truck with a 100 gallon in bed fuel tank and a tall canopy to cover stuff in the truck bed. This added thousands of dollars to the base cost. So, in the end the cost was quite high. A higher end towable can cost well over $50K fully outfitted and add a $80K truck and additional equipment the cost difference is not nearly as much as one would think. Our setup was nearly 10 years old when we traded it in for a motorhome. We were looking at replacing at least the trailer if not the truck as well.
msturtz 08/21/19 08:41am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Pros and Cons of owning a class A RV

We went from towable RVs to motorized. We have never looked back. The convenience of being able to jump in turn the key and go is simply much less work. We use the RV much much more than we ever used the towable units. With our towable we had to hitch up, including the bars, chains, breakaway cable and so on, load the generator into the truck, load all the blocks gas cans and other required stuff into the truck. It routinely took well over an hour to get hooked up to leave including loading everyting we needed into the truck. Keep in mind this did not include loading the trailer with clothes, food and other items. When we park for the night or at a location, we had to back in, fiddle with the blocks to get the trailer level from side to side, unhook and level front to back, then manually drop the landing jacks to stablize the trailer. This is in addition to the normal items such as connecting the water, power, sewer etc. and putting out the slides. Overnight dry camping was also a hassle becausing finding a place to put boards down to level side to side and then level front to back without unhitching is hard. If we want power other than the very limited available from the inverter we have to connect the generator in the bed of the truck to the power cord in the back of the trailer. I did eventually install a generator on the rear bumper but that had the negative effect of leaving the generator out in the rain and we couldn't cover it until it cooled down. With a motorhome I back in, park, push a button to level the coach, all while being completely dry. Then I do the normal stuff of connecting the external connections and putting the slides out. Overnight parking is also very simple, park and push a button to level. If we need more power than is available from the batteries the generator automatically starts with the AGS system available on many motorized units. If the coach you are looking at doesn't have an AGS system it can easily be added. Yes, the cost to maintain is more expensive but since we use it more often it balances out.
msturtz 08/20/19 06:42pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Trickle charger for batteries

Most motorhomes have a combined inverter converter. Usually they are made by Magnum Energy or Xantrex. They charge the battery when connected to shore power. Most of them are configurable first battery type (flooded, AGM, gel) as well as any equalization requirements. If the inverter/converter charger fails for some reason it is possible that the voltage is too high causing the batteries to boil. I would check the open circuit voltage when on shore power with everything but the charger off. Then test again with the batteries connected. If you have a higher voltage than 13.8 with the batteries fully charged there’s a problem with the inverter/converter unit. In the unlikely event you have a separate converter the same test applies however you will only need to replace the converter.
msturtz 08/14/19 10:10pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Fuel economy and additives

So now i am trying to chase down a owners manual for a 2008 Triton V10. All Google does is route me to their highest paying advertisers or send me to some site that wants me to download their softwre on my PC....year. right...like i will do that. I do need a PDF of a 2008 Triton engine if some some can send me a link without installing porn or some other cookie on my PC...LOL! try duckduckgo.com they don't do that.
msturtz 06/12/19 05:22pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Fuel economy and additives

In my experience, the use of 10% ethanol fuel reduces my MPG by about 10%. I know the "experts" say it should only be reduced 2-3%, but in 4 different vehicles, INCLUDING my 8.1L W-22 Motorhome, the measured reduction in MPG over time hovers right around 10%. Pretty much all we have here in the NorthEast and I believe most of the East Coast, is 10% ethanol blends. It's **** near impossible to find pure gas. But when I'm on the road and DO find it, I use it! So, IF you can find REAL gas for under a 10% price premium, I'd say go for it! ~Rick This is because that engine isn’t optimized for ethanol. Ethanol is challenging because the percentage isn’t consistent. The ECU must be able to dynamically determine the ethanol percentage on the fly and adjust the timing and amount of fuel injected. If isn’t optimized then the fuel economy suffers.
msturtz 06/12/19 12:00pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Fuel economy and additives

Your engine has a sophisticated computer management system. If you use the MINIMUM fuel octane as recommended by the owner's manual, which is probably 87 octane, the computer will make the necessary adjustments to give you the best performance/mileage. Using a higher octane fuel will not improve the mileage on an engine that has the computer calibrated for 87 octane. This is absolutely correct, what is worse is if the ECU (Engine computer) is calibrated for a certain minimum octane and a higher octane fuel is used then fuel economy can actually suffer i.e. get worse. Octane is resistance to pre-ignition or knock. This occurs when the air-fuel mixture ignites before the spark plug is fired by the ECU. Gasoline engines are homogeneous ignition combustion engines where the ignition is controlled by the ECU sending a spark to the spark plug vs. stratified charge compression ignition in diesel engines that rely on injecting fuel at precisely the time the ECU wants ignition to occur. It should be noted that with gasoline engines that do rely on a higher octane fuel such as boosted engines e.g. Ford EcoBoost or higher performance engines such as the GM 6.2L V8 can and will use 92 octane fuel and will have better fuel economy on higher octane fuel. The reason for this is the higher compression ratios and or high boost pressure. In these engines, the ECU will back off the timing and or actually inject more fuel if engine pre-ignition (knock) is detected. This would necessarily cause poorer fuel economy than using the recommended octane fuel.
msturtz 06/12/19 10:41am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Fuel economy and additives

The easiest way to improve fuel economy is slow down. A class A motor home is a large rectangular box that isn’t very aerodynamic.
msturtz 06/12/19 09:01am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Selling an RV with a lien

This is easily done with a purchase and sale agreement coupled with a notarized release of interest. You and the buyer would come to an agreed amount and then go to your bank. At your bank, you and the buyer would sign a legally binding purchase and sale agreement (you can find one online) and notarize the release of interest form. Your bank would either accept the cash or wire transfer for the loan amount and any amount over the loan balance. The buyer would then process the wire transfer from their bank. If the buyer is using a check from their bank then the 10-day rule would apply. The check can be "sent for collection" which means that your bank would send the check via the ACH system to the payer bank for funds transfer. As soon as the funds clear the buyer can take delivery. Technically, they can take the purchase and sale agreement combined with the release of interest form to the Department of Licensing to gain title to the RV. I am not an attorney. This is just like selling any other titled property such as car or boat.
msturtz 06/05/19 01:46pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Battery Question

If you have different voltages in the the chassis and house battery banks then the systems are not connected for some reason. Many older coaches did not have the BIRD (bidirectional relay with delay) or similar system. The way coaches without such a system is a very simple ignition relay that connects the battery banks together when the engine is running. Unfortunately if the coach is parked for too long the coach battery can go dead or drop low enough that the coach won’t start. Typically they do have an emergency start button on the dash but that doesn’t solve the underlying problem. As another poster mentioned they do sell products that charge the coach battery bank from the house converter if power is available. You can also retrofit modern version of a bird. Bottom line if the voltage is different then you either have a defective BIRD or one was never installed from the factory.
msturtz 06/01/19 11:11pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: 34/35' diesel pusher question. Newbie

36' DP 275 HP Cummins and 6 speed Allison with a Freightliner chassis. No stability issues towing. A little underpowered but not an issue. LP generator with its own tank and will run everything in the MH. Diesel generator would be easier but LP was not a deal breaker and it is quieter than any of the gas or diesel generators in camp. Most DP that size will have a 5,000 lb. hitch so plan on reinforcing it. I choose to stay at the 36' length so I could stay under the 65' total length with trailer or toad. Lots of good rigs available in your price range. Our 33.3 34.5' has a 10K hitch but as a practical matter, we are restricted due to GCWR to less than that.
msturtz 05/23/19 04:51pm Class A Motorhomes
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