RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'myredracer' found 643 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 33  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Why a discrepancy between sticker payload & actual weight?

That seems really heavy for gasser. Is it fully loaded? No, just me, 1/2 a tank of gas and a few pieces of firewood. It's a crew cab, is 4x4 and now has the canopy. That's all I can think that might account for extra weight above a base model.
myredracer 06/25/19 08:53pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Survey-- City Water vs pump

Haven't used the FW tank in the 5+ years we've had this TT. DW refuses to drink water out of the tank even if we were to use it. Only had a low pressure problem in a CG once otherwise city water has always had good pressure. We've had the toilet valve fail several times (valve replaced twice) and one time water ended up on the floor and got into the insulation below. Pulled the coroplast down immediately and replaced the insulation. Not fun. The junk Thetford toilet has been replaced with a much better Dometic 310. Since we never dry camp, I installed a 120 volt solenoid valve and a switch next to the door. If we go out, we just have to flip the switch and then don't have to worry about water damage. I think there's a water sensor that you can place on a floor to sense leaks and could be connected to a solenoid valve. I even thought of installing a solenoid valve just for the toilet and a time delay off switch in the bathroom. Toilets are the most likely thing to leak. Someone could easily forget to fully shut off a sink or shower faucet and that could be a good argument for leaving grey tank valves open in a CG.
myredracer 06/25/19 05:13pm General RVing Issues
RE: Why a discrepancy between sticker payload & actual weight?

Just got a "new" 2012 GMC Sierra 2500 CC. Just ran through a hwy truck scale today. The door jamb sticker says payload capacity of 2922 lbs but when I subtract the actual weight from the GVWR, I get 1674 lbs. Just added a canopy/cap and am guessing it weighs around 200 lbs so that would account for a bit of the difference. Same thing on our old F250. It had a sticker payload cap. of 2800 lbs (approx., going by memory) and an actual of 1800 (again,approx. by memory). Is it because the vehicle manufacturers use a stripped out reg. cab model for GVWR? The crew cab and 4x4 driveline stuff will add quite a bit of wt. Maybe that's the answer?? Our TT has a TW of 950 lbs. So the Sierra is okay there, but what if we had 4 adults, the dog and a bunch of cr@p in the bed? We'd be over the GVWR... Something doesn't add up. What did the scale say you weighed? The payload sticker is simple. GVWR of said vehicle minus the curb weight of the same vehicle. Highway truck scale? Not your best choice. Cat scales would be better.I just happened to be going across the border today to pick up a parcel and there's a truck weigh scale right there so I did a quick in and out. Yeah, pretty easy to calculate. I've weighed before on this same scale and compared it to a scale at a grain elevator on the same day and got the same result and also at another hwy scale on the WA state side on another day and all 3 were the same. The scale total today was 3550 kg, 7826 lbs and the GVWR is 9500 lbs. I might need to double check the weight another day at a CAT or other hwy scale. Haven't weighed the TT for a few years and could do with another weigh-in at a CAT scale somewhere anyway. I weighed our F250 quite a few times and always got the same discrepancy.
myredracer 06/25/19 05:01pm Tow Vehicles
RE: China Bomb got me, now to repair

X2 on the scrim tape. It's made for RVs and is quite a bit thicker than gorilla tape and would be a good choice for the area above the wheels. Available at RV parts vendors and online.
myredracer 06/25/19 04:50pm Travel Trailers
RE: How to add support to my Short Queen?

The OSB under our 8" memory foam mattress is sagging quite a bit after 5 years and has been getting worse every season. It's ridiculously bowl shaped now. I blame the extra weight of the dog sleeping between us sometimes... :) Today I just bought 3 pieces of 1/4" 1.5"x1.5" angle iron and am going to drill some hole in them and attach them to the underside of the OSB. They'll run in a fore/aft and I'll use some 1/4" machine screws. Should be good to dance on after that. Not that it makes a difference, but only the OSB over the under-bed storage hinges upward. We had a previous TT that had the entire piece of plywood under the mattress hinge up at the head of the bed. With the weight of the memory foam mattress, I had to relocate the attachment points for the gas struts to keep it up when lifted and worked fine after that.
myredracer 06/25/19 04:46pm Travel Trailers
RE: Furnace

MUST have a return air inlet of a min. size spec'd by the furnace manufacturer. Also must have min. clearances to sides and top, also as per specs.
myredracer 06/25/19 04:36pm Travel Trailers
Why a discrepancy between sticker payload & actual weight?

Just got a "new" 2012 GMC Sierra 2500 CC. Just ran through a hwy truck scale today. The door jamb sticker says payload capacity of 2922 lbs but when I subtract the actual weight from the GVWR, I get 1674 lbs. Just added a canopy/cap and am guessing it weighs around 200 lbs so that would account for a bit of the difference. Same thing on our old F250. It had a sticker payload cap. of 2800 lbs (approx., going by memory) and an actual of 1800 (again,approx. by memory). Is it because the vehicle manufacturers use a stripped out reg. cab model for GVWR? The crew cab and 4x4 driveline stuff will add quite a bit of wt. Maybe that's the answer?? Our TT has a TW of 950 lbs. So the Sierra is okay there, but what if we had 4 adults, the dog and a bunch of cr@p in the bed? We'd be over the GVWR...
myredracer 06/25/19 04:29pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Terrible factory splices in brake wiring

On the subject of wiring, here's a suggestion I make to all new trailer owners. Spend the time on your back under the trailer to inspect all the runs of wiring. On my trailers ( all of them: travel trailer, two horse trailers and one flat deck equipment trailer ) I found places where wiring was run thru hole in the frame or around other edges where the wire could chafe and sooner or later rub thru the insulation causing a short to ground.What I found in the axle tubes was small rubber grommets. Great, except they don't have a groove in them and just push in. I wasn't going to use them but I couldn't get them to stay in place at all. That means the #18 wire with it's thin insulation and no overall jacket is subject to chafing and could eventually short out or break. I don't understand how the axle and trailer manufacturers can do this.
myredracer 06/25/19 10:56am Travel Trailers
RE: Terrible factory splices in brake wiring

I do not solder wire connections that are subject to vibration. That creates a section that cannot flex. Over time, it can break right next to the solder. I read somewhere that in some applications it is against code. (marine?) A proper crimp fitting and marine shrink tubing will do a fine job....What I did is tie-wrap the splices solidly to the axles and to the propane pipe so they should be fine. There was just enough space to slip in a tie-wrap between the U-bolts and axle tubes. The magnet wire that comes on the backing plates is only about 6" long and maybe would be nice if they gave you a couple continuous feet of it instead so you can get up to the frame. Thinking about it now, it would have been easier to do the splices on all 4 wheels with the backing plates off the axles instead of me laying on the ground under the TT. Next time... :( I like westend's idea of the distribution block.
myredracer 06/25/19 08:51am Travel Trailers
RE: mild rant, contractors and repair folks

Not long ago we hired a guy off CL to do some tiling work and he turned out to be the FIL of the chief building inspector in our municipality. His work was VERY good and on time! :) All the trouble you had in the residential arena and you hire someone off Craigslist?? You got lucky on that one, usually those are the bottom feeders, not all of them of course. Glad it worked out for you :) DanFirst thing we did was check references and qualifications. He was a retired guy that had been in the trade a long time and knew his stuff. I hate doing caulking and he was freakin' good at it! Not everyone on CL is bad.
myredracer 06/24/19 06:18pm General RVing Issues
RE: Terrible factory splices in brake wiring

What you've done is a series connection. You have both drums in series on one side and have two drums in series from one end of axle to the other. A Star pattern typically has each drum having it's own pair of wires. The power can be distributed by a series wire connection to the source of power or, as I did, through a distribution block so that each brake assembly has its own pair of wires. I pulled it through heavy plastic flex-conduit and plastic boxes located against the frame. There are still two splices near the drums to power the magnets. I soldered mine and covered with heatshrink. The 12 ga you used is definitely an improvement and you should notice better braking, immediately.Thanks for the clarification. What did you use for a distribution block? Does it have a watertight cover?
myredracer 06/24/19 06:13pm Travel Trailers
RE: What type of insulation?

Purchased Dow blue foam 1.5 inches thick, will fit between the 2x2 or I should say 1.5x1.5 rafters.Some photos of the install might be nice. :)
myredracer 06/24/19 12:31pm General RVing Issues
RE: mild rant, contractors and repair folks

I spent a career in the construction industry in commercial, institutional & light industrial. That sector is completely different. You do NOT hold anyone up on projects or you can find yourself in deep doo-doo or even sued. If you're going to hire someone on a residential project, you need to get references. If you don't and have issues, it's on you. The residential sector can be a rat race full of all kinds of flaky "contractors". Adam Corolla's TV show How to Catch a Contractor was interesting while it was still on. When we bought our first house in the 70s, we hired a contractor to do some siding. They just weren't showing up and the owner ended up saying the guy he was going to send out cut his thumb off on a skil saw. Yeah right. Dismissed them and I did it myself instead. Decades later, I think I've heard just about every excuse possible. In our current house that we built I hired a large local company to do the insulation. I discovered the installer was installing only one out of the two specified layers of batt insulation and you couldn't tell at first glance. Kicked the company off the job and said I would pay them for max. 1/2 of what looked okay. Never heard back. Not long ago we hired a guy off CL to do some tiling work and he turned out to be the FIL of the chief building inspector in our municipality. His work was VERY good and on time! :)
myredracer 06/24/19 09:56am General RVing Issues
RE: What type of insulation?

Think about how a vapor barrier is installed in a house.That was the point of me asking. They use unfaced and I wondered about using faced and humidity build up in a closed roof, no attic to vent.This is the problem. RVs have the vapor barrier/retarder on the wrong side of a wall or ceiling compared to buildings. If using batt insulation in a ceiling in a building, you require a gap or space for air movement and it needs to be vented to remove moisture, whether it's a vaulted ceiling or has an attic. When batt insulation absorbs moisture, the R-value drops. Not good. And in cold weather you can have a high humidity level if you don't take measures to remove moisture-laden air. The very best insulation job you could do is spray foam. It doesn't require an air gap to the underside of a roof deck. It encapsulates everything and leaves no un-insulated cavities. Costly for a small area like in an RV unless you could perhaps tow it to a job site somewhere where they're doing a spray foam job. If you lucked out and found someone, I'd do the underside of the floor too. If it were me, I'd look at using closed cell rigid foam. Glue it to the underside of the roof deck and build it up in layers using PL400. Fill any voids with spray foam in a can. You'll end up with a very well insulated ceiling that way. I bought a ton of rigid foam for our garage floor at a building recycling place for a fraction of the new cost. Just don't use open cell rigid foam. For spray foam or rigid foam, you'd of course need the ceiling down. RV manufacturers do a lousy job of insulation ceilings. Ours has voids all over, isn't very thick and is compressed all over. The open cell foam they use in walls is also a poor choice as moisture migrates right through it to the exterior fiberglass where it will condense.
myredracer 06/24/19 09:37am General RVing Issues
RE: Mosquitos

Mosquitoes sense your fear. :) Well, sort of. Mosquitoes sense the CO2 from your breath (in addition to skin odors) so if you get anxious and breath faster, you could be attracting more of them. :E I've been around them since the day I was born because we camped every summer at my parents cabin where there was plenty of them. I've gotten used to just ignoring them and they don't seem to bother me. Thermacell works pretty good if you want to sit outside. Inside, a fly swatter works okay except I have high freq. hearing loss and can't hear them anymore. DW points them out and it's my job to whack them. She has some kinda Avon product she uses. Worst CG we've been to was next to the Pend Oreille river in Newport WA. Wall to wall mosquitoes and other flying insects so bad it was impossible to be outside. Like a London pea soup fog. Don't go there!!!
myredracer 06/24/19 09:17am General RVing Issues
RE: Bottom damage

Am I the only one to ask how far over the axle rating are you running? From Wayne’s post: “...You might replace the springs as a first step to see how it goes. Your axle weights were awfully close to 7,000 max anyway at 6,780...” Mine are 3500# axles, confirmed yesterday. Actual loaded weight, from local Flying J scale, posted earlier in the thread. And from previously: myredracer wrote: What is the TT GVWR and what are the axle ratings? Have you ever taken the TT through a scale to get it's weights?
myredracer 06/24/19 09:10am Travel Trailers
RE: Terrible factory splices in brake wiring

Are you going to rewire with a star pattern or keep it in series? (If you already said, sorry, I missed it)Got it all in yesterday. If you'd call it a star pattern, that's what I did. I tied the cable to the propane pipe all the way down one side and then with a splice at each drum on that side, ran across to the other end of the axle. Do they do it in series sometimes? That'd create more voltage drop and the last brake. Have to say, that was not a fun job crawling around under the trailer much of the day. Starting to feel my age. :( If heavier gauge wire is what should be used, the holes in the axle tubes aren't large enough for more maybe more than 16 ga. with jacketed cable. The wire would have to have been installed by the axle manufacturer, in our case Al-ko.
myredracer 06/24/19 09:00am Travel Trailers
RE: Gas

Formaldehyde is in plywood, OSB, the glues in cabinets doors and in a few other materials in RVs. It's quite common in building materials. Here's a little info. for example. here. Google RV + formaldehyde and you'll find lots of info. Could be as simple as a failed air admittance valve under the kitchen or bathroom sink. Could also be the shower p-trap has no water in it. Grey tank odor can be pretty foul and not unlike a gas sort of smell. We've had to replace our AAVs 3 times and eventually got Oatey commercial grade ones (not cheap though). If it was a propane leak, you'd expect your CO/propane detector to go off but your propane is off and no alarm. How old is the RV? Formaldehyde definitely has a distinctive odor of it's own. It's usually dissipated after a few years. IIRC, some people are more sensitive to the odor.Bought it brand new 2018. I thought formaldehyde are used to preserve dead bodies. Didn't know it's used in trailers.
myredracer 06/23/19 08:26pm Beginning RVing
RE: Level trailer

I set ours up to slightly nose down. I had it level and went to the next possible setting to get it down at the front. Moving the hitch head down on the shank one hole was too much. I ended up getting a ball with a 1" rise off the internet (could not find elsewhere) to get it slightly nose down. After re-adjusting our Reese DC WDH, it was a noticeable improvement having it slightly nose down.
myredracer 06/23/19 09:57am Towing
RE: Gas

Could be as simple as a failed air admittance valve under the kitchen or bathroom sink. Could also be the shower p-trap has no water in it. Grey tank odor can be pretty foul and not unlike a gas sort of smell. We've had to replace our AAVs 3 times and eventually got Oatey commercial grade ones (not cheap though). If it was a propane leak, you'd expect your CO/propane detector to go off but your propane is off and no alarm. How old is the RV? Formaldehyde definitely has a distinctive odor of it's own. It's usually dissipated after a few years. IIRC, some people are more sensitive to the odor.
myredracer 06/23/19 09:43am Beginning RVing
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 33  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS